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Dr. Jeff Feinman

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  • in reply to: tick borne illness #9643

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Welcome back Betsy!

    Badger is a lucky pup to have you thinking holistically and homeopathically for him.

    I’d strongly consider probiotic and immune support for him.

    Rx Biotic, Glucammune, Immuno DMG Pro, etc. are all useful in this situation.

    I’d also strongly advise consulting with a vet homeopath to get him back on the right track. I just replied with some referral recommendations elsewhere on the boards. Let me know if you can’t find the info.

    Have a great evening.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Old dog with severe adverse reaction to Advantage #9642

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Betsy. Thanks for getting back to me.

    I’m so glad that Josie is better!

    Unfortunately Nux would probably not help much with her deeper issues.

    The good news however is that you can still add a well-trained and experienced vet homeopath to her vet care team. Even though you don’t have one nearby many of us act as remote consultants!

    That’s why I formed the nationwide [url=https://www.homevet.com/browse-articles/for-healthy-pets/veterinary-homeopathy-consulting-group-brochure]Veterinary Homeopathy Consulting Group [/url]a few years ago.

    theavh.org is another great place for referrals.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Old dog with severe adverse reaction to Advantage #9639

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Oh dear Betsy, I’m so sorry to hear about Josie. I’m also sorry that this reply is delayed.

    I agree that an Advantage reaction sounds most likely. However now that we’re weeks after the application, how’s she doing??

    In general, acute homeopathic medicines can be very effective at treating these kind of skin reactions. The correct remedy will be based on the specific overall reaction (“the totality of symptoms”) to the cause. For example, not wanting to be touched or going off on her own after the Advantage points to remedies like Nux vomica.

    Please let us know how she is doing now.

    Thanks!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Eating schedule #9638

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sorry for the slow reply Jennifer. I’m just now seeing your question.

    My answer is (yup, you guessed it) that it depends.

    Some do beter eating early, some need a pm snack. Typically cats eat smaller, more frequent meals so one before bed (and even overnight using an automated feeder) is OK.

    Have fun this week!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Tessa- My Sweetie….Need some Direction #9637

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    That’s right Eileen. Since you have a consultation with a vet homeopath coming up soon, it’s best not to administer this potentially deep-acting remedy. That’s actually a good general rule (not giving “chronic” home prescriptions when you are working with a vet homeopath).

    It could alter symptoms making it harder for the vet to prescribe accurately.

    Please let us know what transpires.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Tessa- My Sweetie….Need some Direction #9625

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Excellent!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Session 4: A (not so) concise summary of it all! #9623

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks Eileen. It was fun (and hopefully useful)!!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Tessa- My Sweetie….Need some Direction #9622

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Eileen-

    By all means have her mass investigated and get some baseline blood and urine testing done.

    Personally, I’m not a fan of aspirating these masses. Rapid appearance and growth is certainly cause for concern unless this is an abscess (which your vet can determine).

    Since this isn’t an acute problem (vs. progression of a chronic imbalance that showed up acutely) I am not in favor of your home treating. Especially if you can get on board with a vet homeopath soon.

    BTW-Goopd work with finding Conium in Boericke’s. This might certainly be a similar remedy and has proven very useful clinically.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Remi- Chronic Skin Problems #9611

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Three big clues to decreasing vitality:

    1-Decreased energy,

    2-Worsening mood,

    3-Diminshed appetite

    Unfortunately losing interest in things previously loved falls into two of those categories.

    However, in Remi’s case, she may also just be temporarily disheartened by her itchiness.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Remi- Chronic Skin Problems #9591

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Strong-smelling products of any sort can be problematic during homeopathic treatment. I would not advise [b]undiluted[/b] essential oils.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Case Study- Luke #9590

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Excellent!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Remi- Chronic Skin Problems #9587

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Eileen-

    Unfortunately, there is no easy answer to the itch reduction question. Warm water bathing and oatmeal soaks are often useful (as long as bathing does not make her itch even more). Our essential oil blend Calm ‘N Soothe spray also helps lots of itchy pups.

    Same holds true for daily brushing/combing/skin massaging.

    A simile (a close-enoughicum remedy vs. the simillimum) can indeed bring other symptoms (clues) to the surface.

    These are often the best guide to the next treatment.

    Skin issues and seizures tell me that vaccinosis (dis-ease from vaccines) is probably a big part of the underlying problem.

    Good luck with these difficult problems.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: First Aid Kits #9581

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I posted the kit under your individual remedy question Jennifer and will also add it to the Facebook group.

    Thanks for the reminder.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Case Study- Luke #9580

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    How about a few doses of Ruta and some joint support such as TRF [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products/health-maintenance/trf-tissue-regeneration-factors-150-30-caps-detail](tissue regeneration factor[/url]) and [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products/health-maintenance/trixsyn-liquid-hyaluronan-45-88-lbs-detail]Trixsyn[/url] (a hyaluronic acid derivative)?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Purchasing Homeopathic Remedies #9579

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Jennifer-

    The kit that I use in my practice is from Natural Health Supply in NM. Jim Klemmer (the owner) sells me a bunch every few months so Amy may have some to dispense.

    If not, here is the [url=http://bit.ly/LYgGCS]direct link[/url] to his excellent 50 remedy emergency kit. Buy the 30c kit.

    And of course Eileen is correct that individual homeopathic medicines are readily available from most health food stores.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Rescued Great Dane #9578

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Judy!

    Gatsby is a lucky boy to be with you. I’d expect that just the quiet. loving stress-free home and fresh food is all he needs to make further progress for now.

    You can also add the HPS ([url=http://bit.ly/1M1i346]Holistic Pet Support[/url]) Green Food supplement and a probiotic (Probio Defense from Xymogen is my favorite).

    Homeopathic prescribing will address any additional vaccine-related energetic imbalances. However, that is best initiated once he is in a more permanent home.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: cute kittens #9571

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Jennifer-

    Yes, they are likely eating less often because they are getting older. This is common (and normal)!

    Maintaining normal weight and good coat condition is usually a great clue to their eating enough (of the right foods).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Session 2: Empowerment through homeopathy! #9570

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Take a look at my [url=http://bit.ly/1U5G8sU]dosing article[/url] for more info. Eileen.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Companion animal symptoms and their interpretation #9569

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    You’re so right Eileen! Symptoms are our [color=#0000ff][b]friends.[/b][/color]

    Value, observe, record and report them and it will pay off.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: cute kittens #9563

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Adorable pic Jennifer!

    Any questions?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Session 2: Empowerment through homeopathy! #9562

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’m so glad that you’re able to log on and post Eileen!

    Yes. Dosing is critical. However, in the situation you mentioned it sounds like both the dose and potency (30c is the potency, 1 pellet/1 diluted tsp. is the dose) worked well. Therefore no further dilution is needed. Typically further dilution helps moderate an over effect (“aggravation”) from the dose.

    This may just be a case of the beneficial effect from the Lachesis wearing off. Talk to your vet homeopath about either a redose or a higher potency, e.g 200c

    I look forward to further questions and seeing you in 6 days!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Companion animal symptoms and their interpretation #9539

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This is a reply. 😛 😛 😛

    in reply to: Companion animal symptoms and their interpretation #9534

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’d love to hear what everyone thinks about this seemingly simple subject.

    That is “normal” temperature.

    Is it OK for a dog to have a [b]102[/b] temp? How about a kitty (Jennifer?). Is this a fever?

    What does body temperature reflect?

    All input is welcome!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Session 1: Introduction to Veterinary Homeopathy #9528

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Here’s some follow-up information from today’s session which was sent to attendees:

    Key points from today with a few articles:

    1-Adopting a holistic viewpoint to become your companion animals advocate: https://www.homevet.com/browse-articles/for-healthy-pets/the-philosophy-of-a-holistic-veterinary-practice

    2-Differentiating common from normal symptoms: http://bit.ly/1Lnp1e5

    3-Understanding the possible responses to any treatment: http://bit.ly/1KO6nkC

    4-Why it’s all about energy link is already at the forum.

    Oh, and as a bonus is my top 10 reasons to use vet homeopathy article:http://bit.ly/1SNOYLP

    in reply to: 30 ONLINE SOURCES OF EQUIPMENT FOR AGING, AILING, #9503

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for sharing this.

    Let’s add lots more resources to this thread.

    I’ll go first with my favorite new homeopathy book: Dr. Jensen’s “[url=http://amzn.to/1Q0TRjP]Practical Guide to Veterinary Homeopathy…”[/url]

    and of course Dr. Hamilton’s fantastic “[url=http://amzn.to/1oerWk4]Homeopathic Care.[/url]..”

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Jack Russell Health Problems #9502

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Even though this is all true to some extent, JRs can be very long-lived. They’re quick learners and make fantastic companions.

    Isn’t that really what it’s all about (having a long and productive life)?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Homeopathic Doctor in Chandigarh #9501

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for letting us know about it.

    I bet they do fantastic work!

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’m so sorry for your loss of Sydney. I hope that this article can help: http://bit.ly/vZrQMz

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: PRA – Loss of Appetite and Balance #9027

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Charlene-

    I’m so sorry for the slow reply.

    Wow, to me, these symptoms sound like there may be something else going on. Centrally. Not just with her eyes. Has she had any recent medications, or vaccinations?

    I hope that she is doing better by now. If not, I’d strongly advise an exam by a vet neurology specialist before deciding on the best way to help her.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: helpful diet resources #8880

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question! In some cases, feeding raw is less expensive than feeding a commercial (and processed) food. This doesn’t even include the potential medication and vet bill savings.

    I usually advise starting with chicken quarters, backs, or other poultry parts that can be inexpensively incorporated into the diet (often for under a dollar a pound).

    Many markets sell less desirable cuts of beef, pork, etc. for very affordable prices.

    In addition, many pet stores and online sources will give rescue groups a discount (especially if they buy in bulk or are a 501c3).

    Unfortunately, affordable organic foods can be more difficult to find. The best bet usually is to befriend a local farmer or butcher that might even give away the less desirable cuts.

    There are also multiple affordable online sources (and mothers that deliver bulk orders to designated pickup spots).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Treating periodic diarrhea in dogs #8786

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Linda-

    She may not need any drug. It sounds like these are infrequent and probably mild episodes. Consider using, when needed, liquid aloe vera or slippery elm.

    Some of my clients also keep the herbal formulation [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=157&category_id=11&keyword=good+form]Good-Form BM[/url] in the house in case of persistent diarrhea problems.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Rabies vaccine question #8774

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your post. Great to see you here again!

    Yes, the one year and three year vaccines are identical. The idea of requiring a booster in 1 year is to ensure an adequate immune response. If there was “proof” that he was vaccinated previously, then the vaccine he recently received probably could be re-certified to last for 3 years.

    No, the very recent (published in the 1/15/15 JAVMA) scientific evidence shows that the overdue immune response is just as good as any other dog receiving the booster.

    Unfortunately, most vets will require a direct vaccine problem or more serious issue to apply for a waiver.

    No. Thuja is not a post-vaccine panacea (unless your dog entered a Thuja state after vaccination). Despite what some believe and even promote. Sorry.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Acute urinary crystals-cystitis-2year old cat #8773

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’m so sorry to hear about your cat. Many cats with this problem are about this age.

    You might benefit by reading the articles at: http://bit.ly/1utF7yk
    and https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/381-what-causes-cystitis-or-fus-or-flutd?

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Culturelle dose? #8577

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your question. Depending on the condition, history and current problem, consider using 1-2 capsules/day.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: 8 year old female cat straining to pee #8533

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I just replied to the poster who asked about male cat urinary symptoms. The reply is directly applicable in this situation (so please read the blog article if you haven’t already).

    As I mention in the blog [url=http://certifiedvethomeopath.com/feline-cystitis-can-prevented-treated-holistically/]article[/url], weight loss and stopping dry food is essential

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: young male cat with urinary tract cystitis #8532

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question and thanks for asking!

    Yes, I agree that the stress of his necessary time away from you probably triggered an underlying propensity to the urinary problems.

    Unfortunately, as you have already seen, removing the stress alone is often insufficient for treating the problem. Once activated, the underlying energetic imbalance that has led to all of the urinary symptoms needs to be addressed. Often, only by doing this can “Pandora’s Box” be closed.

    In my experience, the most effective energetic treatment for these problems is with properly prescribed homeopathic medicines.

    You can find a qualified vet homeopath by [url=http://www.theavh.org/referrals]searching[/url] the AVH directory.

    Before and during treatment I’d advise making all of the changes that I discuss in the blog [url=http://bit.ly/1utF7yk]article[/url].

    It’s also very important to not get too upset with your kitty. He’s not doing this on purpose, and it’s not all “in hi head”. This is one of many examples of environmental activations of chronic dis-ease.

    [b]Homeopathy can help![/b]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Can Companion Animals Get Ebola? #8531

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    3 brave MD homeopaths arrived in West Africa last weekend to treat (and potentially cure and prevent) Ebola. Here’s what they had to say soon after landing:

    The team is composed of Richard Hiltner (California), Edouard Broussalian (Geneva), Medha Durge (Mumbai) and Ortrud Lindemann (Barcelona)

    Optimistically,

    Dr. Jeff

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
    Monrovia, 19th of october 2014

    Dear All,
    This is Richard Hiltner, Edouard Broussalian, Medha Durge and myself from Wingus Guesthouse, Monrovia. We arrived on Friday night at about half past seven. Only our plane on the whole airport except for one small Aircraft of the UN which according to one of their collaborators is exclusively for their own use. The Air Brussels flight was half full, the staff does not know how much longer they will keep on flying. Most of the passengers were American citizens : soldiers the majority, some logistics in charge to build a “UTI the World has not seen” (from Alabama), members of the US embassy, chinese buisiness men, the odd journalist, a team of seven doctors sent by the Swedish government, many Africans etc.

    On arrival the atmosphere is tense, we get our aprox temperature taken. Warnings about Ebola everywhere!!! One of the luggage pieces is lost: thanks to God at least it is not one with our medicines. We are blessed with 110 remedies in 3 to 4 potencies ( from 30 to 10M) from Hahnemannian, Gudjons & Remedia. How Could we have dared to go here without our most valuable tools???

    We are received by a Representative of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs ( Asriel C. Davis), Victor Doolakeh Taryor ( our protector and guide for the next weeks), Victoria from the Health Department and our drivers with two pick up trucks. Divine Key Anderson, our filmmaker and present director of Film Board could not get a license to get into the airport plus there is a ban on riding the motorbike back to his home alter 10 pm. Victor and Victoria let us off a Wingus Guest House, a comfortable and clean private run guest house and rush home as well as 11 pm is the curfew time for Monrovia’s streets.

    There we are, tired ( Richard travelled for nearly 36 hours), hungry but spot on: we finally reached after so many weeks of struggling to be able to travel to what we had decided to do. We are destined to help the people of Liberia to fight Ebola Virus Disease with an effective means of fighting epidemics : homeopathic remedies. And we thank Renzo, Altunay, André, Conni and Curt for setting us on the track by their unlimited efforts and Michael Kölsch and Siegfried Ziegler to connect us to Ganta Hospital, a well run hospital with three Liberian doctors left and specially trained staff in Nimba County. So many foreign doctors have fled the country, they say there is only about fifty Liberian doctors of whom 35 are working in actual health institutions for a population of 3.5 million…

    Saturday is our first contact making day: The Board of Trustees from Ganta Hospital ( Dr Boayu, no less than the National expert on Aids working for years for the WHO and is a widely travelled man. Dr Helena, former Health Minister and trained in Public Health out of the country as well ( Germany and US) and their colleague responsible for communication skills ). They were so interested in our mission that we had a hard time leaving after two hours and asked/ pleaded us to not only stay for our intended three weeks…

    Off to Monrovia’s center. Print outs of our titles and CV´s for the Health Ministry, five minutes of internet just for the most urgent mails cause there is no WiFi in our guest house. We are accompanied in all of our steps by our most skilled and lovely filmmaker Divine Key Anderson who already contributed to the epidemic by producing a very concisive film about Ebola in Liberia which can be seen on the Web page of Freunde Liberia´s e.V. He was not very happy on the film ban by the Liberian Government because for him pictures are the most important footage for beating the crisis Liberia is facing right now. (Since about ten days there is no more pictures on Ebola Patients, ITU’s, dead people or so allowed by the government.) But the most surprising of our lovely and well organized hosts is Victor Doolakeh Taryor, the present medical administrator, ex nurse, business manager, driver, organizer, translator etc… you cannot possibly wish for a better, more efficient and friendlier person who actually came all the way down from Ganta Hospital ( about five hours drive away up north east) to receive us and take care of almost all of our needs. He is also the person to put us up to date about Liberia´s history, show us all the historical sites, teaches us the cultural no go’s… ( Please at least read Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s book “This child will be great” or Leymah R. Gbowee’s ” Mighty be our Powers” to get into the fascinating history and battle for freedom of this crisis shaken country if you find time for preparing your stay here…)

    Sunday is leisure and important church day: Liberia has more than sixty percent of christians, 25% of muslims and the rest being tribal people. People sooo much dress up for going to church!!! And all is closed, time for catching up on our sleep, getting our souls to slowly slowly arrive and adapting to food ( actually very tasty and even though famine has started due to the closing of borders has quite a variety), customs, temperatures, rain, bumpy roads etc

    The real challenge however is yet to come : restoring the sick to health. But we are taking first steps by freeing Victor from his eleven years lasting head and neck pain and have a list of patients for tomorrow already. The other part of it is to work as an international team coming from all the different parts of this world, different schools, different ages, different life experience etc. For us, it seems to work since we seem to complement one another and that was already shining through on the telephone conferences…( energetic synergy).

    Monday will be our Ministry day and crash course day for Ebola patient management in the JFK hospital… Also we have to all stand up for Divine and his film permit of our endeavour in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    Enough for tonight,
    We hope to all meet you on the next telephone conference and hope to be able to tell you about our first EVD patient encounters in Ganta Hospital.
    Love from us all,
    Ortrud

    in reply to: Can Companion Animals Get Ebola? #8512

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I am happy to report that unlike the fate of poor Excalibur (the Spanish nurses dog) the dog owned by the patient in Dallas will not be killed.

    Science and public outcry win!

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for asking Chris and for re-posting from Facebook.

    Yes, this combo can work wonderfully tho typically is not my initial modification in these cases.

    First off is often tremendous improvement in quality of life and morning slowness with fresh food feeding and homeopathic prescribing done by a certified vet homeopath. The AVH site can refer you [url=http://theavh.org/referrals/]here[/url].

    Second would be the wonderful benefit gained from local heat treatments and massage. You can do this yourself at home in the morning before rising. I am also a big fan of the home-administered electrical stimulation of the [url=http://www.assisianimalhealth.com/pet-owners/]Assisi loop[/url].

    Third are supplements as needed such as those you described, Antiox, Boswellia, Nutriflex, etc. (more info on these is available by searching in the store area of the site).

    I also wrote a comprehensive article on treatment of arthritis [url=http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/holistic-treatment-of-arthritis/]here[/url].

    Feel free to contact me if I can help further.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Immune/Detox support after vaccines #8496

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question! Thanks so much for asking. This is an issue that my new clients ask almost every day.

    The very best way to deal with this scenario is by directly manipulating the internal energetic imbalance caused by surgery + drugs+ vaccination.

    In my clinical experience, homeopathic treatment is the best way to do this. Ideally along with optimal holistic management of fresh food feeding, exercise (outside is best) and mental/emotional stimulation, e.g training, agility, etc.

    I’d also consider using a few detox supplements such as a great probiotic (I love Rx Biotic from Rx Vitamins), [url=http://naturalpetrx.com/product_details.php?formula_id=22&KeepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&modal=false&height=600&width=800]Pet-Detox [/url] and [url=http://www.animalzeolites.com/Page_12.html]zeolite[/url] (a natural detoxifier).

    Good luck! I’m sure that she’ll be OK. If you want to consult further, feel free to start [url=https://www.homevet.com/to-become-a-new-client-of-dr-jeff-feinman]here[/url].

    Have a great evening.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Salivary cyst in 10-month-old puppy #8424

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hard to say which holistic and natural (hopefully) supplement she is using. Regardless, these are not really addressing the underlying problem (if there even really is a problem–many normal pups get pimples on their belly that often resolve without treatment).

    Personally I work on strengthening the immune system vs. worrying too much about the secondary bacteria.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Herniated disc in dog- has anyone gone through this? #8395

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi!

    I’m so sorry to hear about Turbo’s neck problem. As mentioned, there’s lots that can be done to help herniated discs without the expensive surgery.

    First of all, the good news. That being the extra space present in the cervical spinal area (the neck). Neurologic deficits and pain from herniated discs occur from irritation and pressure on the nerves in the area. The extra space in this area is therefore very helpful clinically and may improve Turbo’s prognosis.

    My advice is to get an exact clinical neurological diagnosis since you have a local vet neurologist. You’re not going for the expensive MRI and surgery, but rather to learn all of the options and get a conventional diagnosis.

    This info can then be used to help guide treatment. Therapies like homeopathy, acupuncture, physical rehabilitation, etc can all be very, very helpful in this situation.

    Feel free to get back to us once you see the neurologist. If you decide against going in then there may be a local rehab facility that can show you exercises to help. Also, natural antiinflammatories like Antiox and Vetri Disc from Vetriscience may help.

    Good luck!

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Acute urinary crystals-cystitis-2year old cat #8329

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for asking. This is a huge problem that effects many cats. Fortunately there are solutions. Some of these can even stop the current symptoms and reduce recurrences.

    As you probably already know, fluid intake and fresh food feeding is key. Unfortunately, many cats nowadays are dry “junk food” junkies. Transitioning to a better diet is key. If possible do not use ANY dry food. Add fluid to her diet by adding chicken, beef (or other fresh meat) broth to her food.

    I’d also advise a few nutritional supplements that can help her get over the acute episode. Things like vitamin C, cranberry extract, mannose , etc. can be very useful to help her body heal. More details are in my FLUTD article [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/381-what-causes-cystitis-or-fus-or-flutd?]in the pet care library[/url].

    In addition to helping with the present symptoms, I strongly advise starting deep-acting homeopathic care. This can help reduce her susceptibility to future problems.

    Lastly, since emotional factors are so very important in this problem, any anxieties, boredom, etc. need to be addressed and reduced. There are lots of online resources for accomplishing this.

    Good luck! Feel free to post any other questions or comments. Also, many of us (holistic vets, homeopaths, and some of my conventional colleagues) can also consult remotely by phone and Skype.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Arthrodesis surgery in a dog after an injury #8328

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Good morning-

    I’m so sorry to hear about your pup’s accident. Thank goodness that he is OK though.

    Great question about treatment options. You’re absolutely right. We are often only offered one option which is not necessarily the one with which we feel most comfortable or the one that will provide the best quality of life (for any of us of any species!).

    Unfortunately in this situation I can’t render a specific opinion as I don’t have enough data. How was he functioning in the splint? Has he been making slow progress (if any)?

    As you probably know, arthrodesis is permanent and may predispose him to problems down the line. Have you discussed this with the surgeon? Did he offer a prognosis for return to full function?

    Lastly, how is he in every other way? Other chronic issues (even if low grade like recurrent ear or skin problems)?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat with Stones in Bile & Pancreatice Duct #8307

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Fresh food feeding is great idea. You might also want to stop all dry food. The more fluids she gets, the better.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat with Stones in Bile & Pancreatice Duct #8305

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Theresa-

    Yes, gallstones in both dogs and cats can be both in the gallbladder itself as well as the bile ducts that lead into and away from the gall bladder.

    In my experience, the best approach is a combination of dietary + homeopathy. Unfortunately, there is no one single homeopathic medicine for this (or any) problem. Individualization and addressing the totality is key.

    There are a few dozen homeopathic medicines that could help both improve the present stones and decrease future stone recurrence.

    What is she eating?

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I agree with Bearsmom. Improving Benjamin’s underlying imbalance that is predisposing him to stones is the most important factor in preventing the recurrence of stones.

    Treating this way (energetically vs. addressing just one factor) will also help reduce his tendency to develop other, future problems.

    Good luck Connie.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Wow! 3 surgeries in the past. So sorry to hear this, but great news that you have been able to avoid further surgery.

    Congratulations on your choice to feed him a fresher diet. You’re luck up there because of a wonderful nearby holistically-oriented pet store. Perhaps you’ve been there already. The name is [url=http://www.yourhealthypetct.com/]Your Healthy Pet[/url] on Rt 25.

    Regarding alkaline water, everyone I know that uses it buys it online so unfortunately I don’t have a local source.

    Good luck and welcome to the neighborhood.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Histiminum for treating a mast cell tumor in a cat? #8184

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    No problem Kim. Helping to inform pet owners about holistic and homeopathic options for their animal companions (and themselves) is my passion. I’m sorry that I couldn’t be of more assistance.

    Perhaps you’ll find something useful [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.browse&category_id=14]here.[/url]

    Enjoy your Sunday.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Histiminum for treating a mast cell tumor in a cat? #8164

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sorry for the slow reply Kim.

    I have never used Histaminum. For a mast cell tumor or otherwise.

    The skin and eye inflammation that comes and goes should respond to careful, deep homeopathic prescribing. In my experience, Apis and Euphrasia won’t deal with the underlying energetic imbalance that caused the tumor in the first place.

    I’d advise a fresh food meat-based diet and antioxidants until you touch base with your usual homeopath. S/he may not have a problem with your using Histaminum as long as other homeopathic medicines are not being used at the same time.

    Consider antioxidants like Astaxanthin and Antiox (grape seed extract).

    Have a great weekend.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog throwing up bile #8006

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Ah, the infamous morning bile vomiting “syndrome”. This is very common so thanks so much for bring it up.

    Yes, the extra meal may help palliate (cover up) the symptom for a while. However, I strongly urge you to use this early warning sign of imbalance to pursue energetic treatment with homeopathy.

    I discuss this syndrome and other similar motility problems in this week’s extensive “Ask the Vet” reply over at Dogs Naturally magazine.com It should be out tomorrow and I will post a link on the homevet.com Facebook Page.

    Have a great day.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Charlie and Trixie-

    Thanks so much for the kind words. I really appreciate them.

    I hope she gets well soon!

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks again for writing Charlie.

    My approach to problems like this is both internal and local. Potato poultices are a great idea as are warm epsom salt soaks combined with gentle massage of her toe. This will help any cellulitis and increase local blood flow and healing.

    I’d personally also use the homeopathic medicine hypericum. For a small dog, I’d add 1 pellet (usually a blue tube of pellets carried by most human health food stores) into 1 cup of bottle/filtered water. From this cup 1 dose of 1cc (~1/4 tsp) is given.

    If my patients have not responded in 24-48 hours or if they improve then worsen, give the bottom of the original cup of solution 10 whacks against the counter or a soft book. This activates and potentiate the medicine. Redose 1cc once daily [b]until there is a change and then stop dosing.[/b]

    Homeopathic medicines can be very powerful and help the body heal itself. As nature intended.

    I’d also strongly advise upgrading her diet to a canned dog food as these are both better for her and contain more of the meat that she needs to heal.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting Charlie. No apologies necessary. You posted like an “old pro”.

    There’s a lot that you can do before amputation. Was this a known injury? What is she eating and what is her life like on a day to day basis? For example, how much exercise and outdoor exposure does she get?

    Does she have any other prior or current problems?

    Have you spoken with a surgical specialist or veterinary homeopath?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: 11 yr old cat with mass in chest and respiratory problems #7926

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Yes, they can have an undefined chest infiltrate that looks like a cancerous mass. Has she been seen or worked up by a veterinary internist? Have any chest x-rays been taken recently to evaluate the growth (or lack thereof) of the mass? Clinical experience of a specialist and diagnostic information can often be helpful in deciding the best way possible to treat her (with homeopathy, nutrition, etc.).

    I’m so sorry to hear that the vet may have given up on her, but you definitely should not as long as her quality of life continues to be good.

    Perhaps talk to him about your feeling that she is not making progress. He may be able to review her case and find a new “entry point” for her homeopathic treatment.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: 11 yr old cat with mass in chest and respiratory problems #7924

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for asking Rachel. By far, your best bet is to continue with homeopathic treatment.

    Personally I follow-up every week or two with my actively-treated patients with cancer.

    Make sure that you are feeding a fresh food diet and talk to your vet about use of some supportive supplements.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Renavast and Urinary S/O RX Food #7659

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your input Jo. You are 100% correct that changing from a dry to a wet food is absolutely the one best thing that can be done for *any* cat. Let alone one wit a history of “cystitis”.

    I beg to differ strongly, as would most holistic vets (including Dr. Hofve) about sticking with a prescription diet from one of these manufacturers. All of the companies you mentioned are owned by massive conglomerate corporations. These tend to care more about their bottom lines and shareholders than your pet. They therefore produce foods with poor ingredients such as genetically modified corn and soy.

    My advice is to stick with a fresh food and meat-based diet (meat is a natural acidifier of the urine) or canned foods from smaller, reputable companies like [url=http://petguard.com/cat-products/canned-food/premium-feast-dinner]Petguard[/url].

    And you’re correct, Renavast is absolutely fine for cats with a history of bladder problems. In fact, these cats may have a higher incidence of future kidney problems as well. Especially if they still eat dry cat food.

    Thanks again for posting and for for pointing out this query. This forum needs more people like you helping out!

    Be well. Stay safe and warm in today’s storm if you are on the east coast.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your great question Mike. No, her ear hair does not necessarily need to be pulled out. As you’ve already seen though, hairy ears [i]can[/i] predispose to secondary problems (ear “infections”).

    Proper ear hygiene can be very important. I say can be because some dogs, even Poodles, never need any attention to their ears (believe it or not). Others need daily cleaning.

    Ear hair can trap moisture and prevents air from circulating in the ear canal. This moist and stuffy environment can allow the bacteria that already live in the ear to multiply. Sometimes, especially if your dog is eating a processed dry food or already has other allergies, the bacteria (and fungus) overwhelm the local immune system in the ears.

    One simple fix is to feed a fresh food diet and supplement with high quality probiotics. Another preventative measure that can also be used for treatment is to promote air circulation in her ears by exposing her ear canals to fresh air. Many pups are OK with having something like a hair scrunchy around their ears to open them up.

    Also, rather than have periodic traumatic full ear hair pulling by the groomer, how about your doing a little at a time? It’s easy and should not be traumatic. Over the course of a week or two you should be able to get her ears nice and clean (and dry).

    Good luck and have a great evening.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Rabies Vaccination puppy protection #7615

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Also, take a look at this post about [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-chat/vaccination-issues/protecting-a-puppy-without-vaccines]protecting puppies[/url] with minimal (or without) vaccination.

    There also are useful resources in my [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/itemlist/category/66-vaccination-decisions]vaccine decisions[/url] library.

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Rabies Vaccination puppy protection #7584

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your question Jade. How fantastic that you are raising your girl as close to nature as possible!

    As you pointed out, the early age vaccinations as well as the rabies vaccine can compromise her immune function.

    You are already doing almost everything that you can to help her remain in a strong energetic equilibrium. Keeping her “balanced” in this way means a few things. Firstly, she’ll be less prone to problems as she ages. Secondly, a strong homeostasis helps reduce potentially harmful reactions to any “stress”.

    I don’t necessarily mean emotional stress. By stress I mean rather any stressor to her body (such as a trauma, bacteria, drug, vaccine, etc.). The stronger her energetic balance and equilibrium, the less that she will react. I love the spinning top analogy. This concept is like a top that is spinning rapidly and thereby is difficult to knock over. Once the top’s spinning slows (or her body weakens) it becomes much easier to knock over.

    Homeopathy treats this balance directly by addressing signs of disharmony. Even though you don’t have a local homeopath, you can still work with one of us remotely by phone, Skype etc as long as you have a local vet who is OK with your doing so. We will then become part of your health care team to help keep your new pup as healthy as possible and treat any problems that arise. This includes any ill effects from vaccination.

    Have a great evening and continue to love and support your new family member.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Will the varied fresh food diet my pet loves kill him? #7519

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your input Beth. I agree that bigger is better when it comes to chunks of whole food. In general. Bigger pieces, meaty bones, etc. help in many ways.

    However, use caution when feeding big pieces (especially bone and less digestible pieces) if your pet wolfs down his/her meal. These pets need either supervision during feeding, or to eat ground food.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: 2.5 yr. old male cat dealing with cystitis #7518

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your question Chris. I’m so glad to see that you are investigating “cystitis” treatments for Marcel. In my eyes, you are actually trying to treat Marcel’s individuality that for some reason is currently manifesting signs of bladder irritation. Not treating cystitis, or FUS, or FLUTD, or FIC, etc.

    This therefore is a fantastic point: [quote]”Not really sure any of this will directly address cystitis itself (but upon doing a bit of research it looks like nothing is really available)”.[/quote]

    You’re right. These prescriptions are designed to reduce any urinary pain and dilate his urethra to make it easier for him to urinate, but don’t deal directly with the cause. The good news is that there are definitely things that you can do to help his body heal.

    There are many triggers for symptoms of irritation of the urinary tract and even urinary blockage. Unfortunately, your kitty already has three of the predisposing factors) male, overweight and lives inside). The very first, and most important treatment therefore is with his lifestyle.

    The best way to help his body and prevent further episodes is to stop feeding [b]any[/b] dry food. This will help in many ways including helping him lose weight, reducing carbohydrates in his diet and increases the water content in his diet. Currently however, I’d be concerned that there is another urinary blockage since he is not passing much urine. Frequent urging to urinate and not passing much may just be a symptom of bladder irritation which needs to be managed chronically, but urinary blockage is a medical emergency requiring an immediate ER vet sit.

    Meal feeding (vs. leaving out dry food) helps in another important way. One, if not the, biggest triggers is stress. The most common cause of stress in cats (and dogs) is lack of mental stimulation. Meal feeding can help increase his engagement with you and the environment.

    You can do this in many ways including adding spots for him to climb and perch, play with him more (e.g. using a laser pointer, cat dancer toy, etc.) hiding freeze-dried food treats, etc.

    Regarding other nutritional changes, I find adding vit C and cranberry extract to be very helpful and there are quite a few out there that are formulated especially for cats and dogs. I personally prescribe those from Rx Vitamins (which you can find online including at my [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.browse&category_id=15]web store[/url]).

    In my practice the mainstay of both treatment and prevention is homeopathically-chosen medicines. These treat the individual internal imbalance that results in dis-ease symptoms. After caring for my patients, one of my main goals is helping more, and more pet owners and vets learn about this exquisitely effective treatment.
    There is lots more about vet homeopathy throughout this site but [url=https://www.homevet.com/how-homeopathy-can-help]this[/url] is a great place to start.

    You can see more of my thoughts on cystitis symptoms here: https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/381-what-causes-cystitis-or-fus-or-flutd?

    Have a great Sunday.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Coconut Oil used as health maintenance? #7506

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi-

    Depends if they will eat it. I’d start with 1/4 tsp and see how it goes (you may need to start even lower). You may not need to increase at all, but if so, increase by another 1/4 tsp.

    Coconut oil can definitely help some kitties, dogs and us!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Allergic Dog #7489

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question! This is a common phenomenon. Avoiding allergic triggers often helps at first but then stops helping. Why, and what to do?

    Avoiding the triggers is only a temporary fix because the underlying immune phenomena are not being treated. Allergic symptoms result when the immune system is hyper-active.

    The longest-lasting treatment is to rebalance the immune system so that allergic triggers no longer cause symptoms. In your pup’s case, eliminating the triggers only temporarily relieves the symptoms which then recur.

    Homeopathic treatment of the patient with allergy symptoms is my treatment of choice. I find that not only do symptoms resolve and stay resolved, but these patients often improve in other, unexpected ways. Fears and behavior issues, chronic gastroenteritis, etc. are all being treated when the whole individual is considered.

    My bottom line is to add a trained vet homeopath to your vet care team. S/he will help both with minimizing triggers as well as treating the underlying immune imbalance.

    In the meantime, you’ll find some general holistic treatment recommendations [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/386-could-my-pet-have-allergies?-if-so-what-can-i-do-about-them?]here[/url] and elsewhere in my immune mediated diseases library.

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Vet care for a newly adopted puppy or kitten #7476

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks! Zylkene and Harmonease can help until you start homeopathic treatment. I use both in my practiced, so they are in my web store at homevet.com

    Stay warm and dry on this cold snowy night.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Vet care for a newly adopted puppy or kitten #7423

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your post. Congratulations on adoption of your new family member! Rescues can make the best pets (I live with two).

    You definitely need to work with a vet who is “OK” with your holistic, natural (and hopefully soon) homeopathic perspective.

    Many of my clients are not close enough to routinely visit me for their appointments. They build a team of vets with whom they work. A local vet for examination and diagnostics, sometimes a Board Certified specialist, and an AVH certified vet homeopath.

    Many of us are willing to work with pet owners remotely as long as they have a local vet who they can see for exams, etc.

    Thanks for preparing for a visit with me in the Spring. All of my potential new client information is [url=https://www.homevet.com/to-become-a-new-client-of-dr-jeff-feinman]HERE[/url].

    In addition, feel free to book a [url=https://www.homevet.com/component/content/article/13-latest-news/243-schedule-an-appointment-online-with-dr-jeff-feinman-certified-veterinary-homeopath]pre-appointment consultation[/url] once you have sent in your new client info.

    Above all, love and have fun with your new pup.

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Trying To Wean Dog Off Antibiotic Need #7309

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your post.

    I agree that all of his issues are related. Yes, homeopathic treatment can address them all and decrease his reliance on antibiotics.

    You can find a trained vet homeopath to add to his vet care team at [url=http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/the-academy-of-veterinary-homeopathy-directory/]this link[/url]. Some of our more detailed [url=http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/dog/ask-the-vet/]”Ask the Vet” replies[/url] to Dogs Naturally readers may also help.

    Happy holidays!

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great!


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting your question Marlene.

    At this point, my personal approach in a new patient would be to wait another week or two. I’d want to see if the antibiotics are effective. General support at this time involves diet upgrade when indicated, and appropriate immune boosting supplements.

    At that point, I’d choose an indicated remedy. Hepar and Sil are good choices but the final choice needs to be based on your individual cat’s characteristic symptoms.

    I’d look particularly at your cat’s history and manifestations of internal imbalance *before* the retrobulbar abscess. I’d also look especially at any overall changes in his demeanor.

    The best to do at this point is to consult with a well-trained vet homeopath since prescribing for this very serious condition is tricky. Practitioners can be [url=http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/the-academy-of-veterinary-homeopathy-directory/]found here[/url].

    Feel free to keep us updated.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hopefully, your dog is fine by.

    Absolutely! In fact, administering homeopathic remedies in water is my preferred method. Especially if the remedy needs to be repeat frequently.

    My clients make up remedy solutions by adding 1 cup of bottled/filtered water to 1-3 of the poppyseed-sized pellets. There’s more info about diluting remedies in my client handout such as [url=https://www.homevet.com/for-current-clients-of-dr-jeff-feinman/item/326]this one[/url].

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Salivary cyst in 10-month-old puppy #6744

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Good news that you are supporting the body with holistic treatments. If these don’t do the trick, you should consider consultation with a well trained vet homeopath.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Administering homeopathic meds to reluctant dog #6743

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Just 1 pillule medicates the entire cup! Then every dose that you give from this solution is medicated. You can even use some of this water to medicate another cup of water!

    Have fun.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Administering homeopathic meds to reluctant dog #6732

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    You can also find syringes in most drug stores. After each use please neutralize the remedy using boiling water (suck it into the syringe, or take it apart and run it through the dishwasher).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hairball like symptoms #6730

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Excellent!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Older dog, hard to walk #6729

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’m so sorry to hear about both of your dogs. The first thing (tonight if possible) I’d do is to give him 1 tsp. of Ignatia 30c. Dissolve the pill (which you may have at home or is available OTC at many health food stores) in 8 oz. of bottled/filtered water and give him 1 tsp. Save the rest. If you don;t see any change in 8-12 hours, then succuss (whack the cup against a counter or your hand) 10x and redose 2 tsp.

    Because his symptoms may be resulting from a serious organ shutdown, I’d also strongly advise an exam and any indicated diagnostics tomorrow.

    Feel free to let me know what the vet finds if you go.

    Best of luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #6728

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Titers are only one small part of this gestalt. They don’t really even tell you if your pet is protected against the dis-ease in question.

    Titers only measure one small fraction of the immune response. In my experience, treating for total body energetic balance (health) is more important.

    This [url=http://vitalanimal.com/fallacy-of-titer-tests/]article[/url] about the fallacy of titers may be helpful.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Salivary cyst in 10-month-old puppy #6727

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your question Ellen. Yes, continue the hot compresses (2-3x a day). These cysts can be notoriously slow to resolve. Where is it located? How long has it been?

    Most importantly, is she acting sick in any other way? Is there a recent history of illness, vaccination, other drug treatment?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Administering homeopathic meds to reluctant dog #6726

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question! I actually much prefer to put *all* homeopathic medicine doses in solution. This way they are best absorbed by the nerves of the mucous membranes (gums and other oral mucosa).

    For reluctant patients, after dissolving the medicine in 1 cup of water, I ask clients to use a syringe to administer. This can then be squirted in the side of his mouth. No need to even open his mouth. If he spits some out, that’s OK.

    For reealy difficult pets, you can add a few drops of milk to the liquid and just let him lick it up.

    There are other methods (such as spritzing with a spray bottle), but these usually work.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hairball like symptoms #6613

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your question. Yes, this is very possibly from some sort of throat irritation. Trying to clear hair, dust or other debris in her throat can sound like this.

    Although less common at this young age, this may also be a feline asthma type of cough. I wonder if there are any smokers in the house? Also, do you use dust-free cat litter? Is there any predictability to when or where this happens? Is the frequency or severity increasing?

    A vet visit to evaluate this cough/choke/wheeze is in order. I’d also advise recording this respiratory noise. Does she have any other respiratory symptoms like sneezing, eye or nose discharge?

    I use papaya routinely for helping dissolve hairballs, but best to not cover up this symptom until it is properly evaluated.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #6608

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for asking about titers. It’s a very timely question. One of my breeder clients and I just discussed this yesterday. Basically, titers only test for antibody production against some sort of pathogen, e.g. distemper and parvo viruses.

    However, antibody production is only one part of the defenses that can be mounted by the immune system. These other (“cell mediated”) defenses are *not* as easily quantified, and are not reflected by titer results. Your pet may be protected against a specific dis-ease despite negative titers.

    This is a complex subject which is addressed in more detail by a vet homeopath colleague [url=http://vitalanimal.com/fallacy-of-titer-tests/]here[/url].

    Feel free to ask any other more specific questions as this can be a confusing topic, e.g. Lyme tests are titers yet most vets consider a (+) test to be a bad thing equating to Lyme disease.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Anesthetic-free tooth cleaning? #6571

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Maybe the home food allergy saliva test [url=http://nutriscan.org/]Nutriscan[/url] from Dr. Dodds can help you decide what to do.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Anesthetic-free tooth cleaning? #6567

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Yes! CoQ 10, Biotene (like Zymox) enzymes, Neem Bark Powder, etc. can help.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Diarrhea caused by antibiotic? #6566

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great! It will be OK to slowly start adding in 25–>50% of his regular diet as the stool consistency improves. Consistently.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Diarrhea caused by antibiotic? #6561

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Moneypenny-

    The symptoms of dysbiosis can occur at almost any time after a course of antibiotics. Typically, the greater the stress to the body, e.g high dose antibiotics continued for a long time, the faster that symptoms like diarrhea, gas, etc. will be seen. That being said, sometimes symptoms can smolder and be very low grade for a long time before acutely manifesting.

    Make sure that the rice that you are using has no whole grains left after cooking (ideally the rice used to treat diarrhea will be the mushy consistency of rice baby food). It is also critical to use a high quality probiotic since the quality of many OTC probiotics vary considerably.

    Even though this diarrhea is associated with antibiotic use, it’s also a great idea to have your vet check a stool sample to rule out intestinal parasites. Many vets may also opt to empirically use a safe dewormer like Panacur despite negative fecal results.

    Dietary “indiscretions” like eating salad dressing and indigestible items may also play a role in your dog’s diarrhea. Even more serious problems like Pancreatitis can result from eating fatty foods. If your dog is acting sick at all or if the diarrhea is getting worse and not better, I’d advise seeing your local vet.

    Have a great weekend. Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Anesthetic-free tooth cleaning? #6445

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi-

    Yes! Dali from HoundsTooth comes every fall and Spring (usually October and April). The schedule of her clinics change each time that she comes.

    If you’d like to be added to the non-client list then please email Amy at: [email protected]

    One proviso though. Since I don’t know your dog (and his mouth), realize that if his dental dis-ease has advanced such that he has deep periodontal pockets and significant gum recession, Dali may only be able to clean superficially and refer you for an anesthetic dental.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Oh no! I’m so very sorry to hear about Prince. Please let me know if I can help in any way.

    Maybe this [url=https://www.homevet.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=243:coping-with-the-loss-of-a-pet]page[/url] will provide some consolation.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’m so sorry for my slow reply Michelle. That’s great news about Prince’s most recent chest x-rays.

    Yes, a tracheal sensation, e.g. a tickle such as from post-nasal drip, is a good possibility.

    I can’t really comment on his acupuncture, herbal treatments, etc. to date, but if they are working, great! Keep them up.

    If not, consider consulting a trained and experienced vet homeopath. We can be found at wwww.theavh.org

    Good luck with Prince.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help with supplements #6213

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Exactly! Modulators help normalize immune function whereas stimulants act to increase it (which is not always ideal in FIV).

    Another example is allergic disease where immune function is already over responsive and external triggers (like foods and pollens) can cause problems. It is best to modulate and not boost the immune systems of these patients.

    My favorite method for immune stimulation is through homeopathy. With these treatments the wisdom of the body is best harnessed (IMO).

    Be well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: SKIN PROBLEM #6212

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Fantastic!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Chronic Renal Failure in a cat #6211

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    It is often safest to screen any breeding cats with periodic kidney tests and urinalyses.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #6210

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Another great question Ellen. The answer depends both on natural exposure (the more exposure to other dogs, especially those that have been recently vaccinated, the greater the likelihood of a titer), and overall health status of your pup.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: renal failure progression and what to do #6209

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great work with controlling her kidney disease and keeping her happy for 21 years!

    Most of my clients treat very similarly to how you have been doing. The main differences include concurrent homeopathic treatment and using ReanAvast instead of Azodyl.

    Also, you can find lots of other reliable information at:

    http://www.felinecrf.org/ and https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/515-the-brighthaven-way-to-support-a-quality-of-life

    Gail at [url=http://brighthaven.org/]BrightHaven[/url] is a great source for info and support.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Eye irritation #6208

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Ellen-

    Sorry for the slow reply. I’ve had a very busy few weeks and not had the time to log on to the forum.

    in general, lubricating eye drops 2-3 times a day following hot compresses can significantly help mild eye irritations.

    Your vet will need to examine his eye for abnormalities if the discharge worsens, if the eye gets redder, and especially if your pup starts to seem uncomfortable in any way like rubbing his eye.

    Have a great day.

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Samone. Thanks for reposting on this forum.

    I’m so sorry for everything going on with your dog, but there certainly more that you can do for her.

    Make sure that you are feeding a fresh food, meat-based diet. Use liver support supplements (my favorite is Hepato Support from Rx Vitamins) and minimize environmental toxins.

    Also consider a high quality probiotic to aid both with her liver and to help any dysbiosis secondary to other meds such as anti-biotics.

    Since inappetance is her main sign at this time, you may also want to consider reducing the Proin as phenylpropanolamine (the active ingredient) can also reduce appetite (in people).

    Good luck, and please keep us apprised of how she’s doing.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Will the varied fresh food diet my pet loves kill him? #6038

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your great question. This is a topic that’s on many pet owner’s minds.

    The current conventional wisdom is that feeding any of the commercial, processed, possibly questionable ingredient diets that are AAFCO-approved is just fine. In fact, it is “best” (or so we are told) to just stick with this same food for your pet’s life.

    Personally I strongly disagree. Our pets are not people. Granted. However the basic tenets of optimal human nutrition (and thereby optimal health) still apply IMHO.

    I advise my clients to feed the freshest food available (and that they can afford), in a wide variety and in moderation as advised at my [url=https://www.homevet.com/diet-discussion/item/313-how-important-is-diet-in-keeping-my-pet-healthy-and-preventing-illness?]feeding primer[/url] on this site. That’s it. Simple.

    The biggest mistake that I see which can harm pets is feeding the same unbalanced food every day. An example might be the small dog that only eats chicken breast. Many pets may do fine on this diet, but it can predispose to problems. That being said however, integrating chicken breast *into* a varied diet is absolutely fine.

    I feed my own rescue dog (who came with a “sensitive stomach”) a mix of RMBs (raw meaty bones), organic meat blends (our local butcher blends all of their leftover pieces together) Vital Essential raw whole meats, freeze dried meats, air-dried, and yes even the occasional dry Epigen and cans from Wysong.

    The well-balanced pet should be able to tolerate all of these food items. Just my opinion.

    Here are some [url=https://www.homevet.com/diet-discussion]articles[/url] about how I advise my clients to feed their pets.

    Have a great Sunday.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Asymptomatic heart murmur in a cat #6007

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi! Great question.

    Personally, I don’t advise starting any drug therapy without a diagnosis. A murmur is merely a description of a “whishing” noise when the heart beats. This observation may be potentially serious, or not at all.

    The best next diagnostic step is to have an echocardiogram performed. This will tell you if there really is any reason to treat further.

    For truly asymptotic patients I start [url=https://www.homevet.com/how-homeopathy-can-help]homeopathic treatment[/url] (which needs to be strictly individualized), modify lifestyle, and monitor closely before any drugs.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Exactly Katie! It is amazing how incisive he was 200 years ago.

    I agree 100% that you would benefit from reading the Organon. I advise either the newest edition (by Wenda Brewster O’Reilly) or the Kunzli edition.

    The Organon is also available for [url=http://www.homeoint.org/books/hahorgan/]free on line[/url].

    More to come…

    Dr. Jeff


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Yes. Medicine is medicine. When possible, work with the body to stimulate healing. In my experience, homeopathy can often resolve the symptoms. In serious conditions like pneumonia, it is important to work with an integrative vet.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shots before spaying #5910

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for asking Christy. Take a look at the many reliable articles (many by others) on this site such as in the [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/itemlist/category/66-vaccination-decisions]library[/url] or on the [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-chat/vaccination-issues]forum[/url].

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: diet and cat urinary problem #5891

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Absolutely Christy! The urinary tract seems to be a more frequent site of disease in the cat (e.g. FUS or FLUTD), but dogs more frequently become incontinent as they age (especially spayed females).

    Thanks for all of your PetChat input.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Chronic Renal Failure in a cat #5787

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi-

    I’m so sorry for the loss of Rascal. It does indeed sound like his quality of life had rapidly deteriorated and his condition was only getting worse.

    How old was he?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help with supplements #5783

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sorry for the slow reply (too many sick animals out there I guess).

    Please send specific web store questions directly through the contact form at the web store.

    In general, 90-125 mg SAMe is fine (I often use 1/2 cap).

    Also, please realize that supplements are not the same as homeopathy. Take a look at the [url=https://www.homevet.com/how-homeopathy-can-help]homeopathy FAQ [/url]for clarification.

    in reply to: Help with supplements #5679

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I don’t us these colstrum products as The IgG 2000 from Xymogen (available mainly by Rx)is a much bigger bang for your buck.

    Consider adding specific liver support like [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=77&category_id=11&keyword=hepato]Hepato Support. For SAMe, I use the SAMe caps from Designs For Health.

    in reply to: Help with supplements #5677

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Colostrum (transfer factor) and beta glucans (Glucamune) would indeed be great choices to add. Consider also topical gum support with Biotene gel and even better is Biotene mixed with Neem bark (which is also an immune modulator).

    Don’t forget general nutrition (what does he eat?).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help with supplements #5643

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question. Every individual needs to be treated differently based on the [url=https://www.homevet.com/component/k2/item/483]common but not normal[/url] symptoms. In general though, immune modulators (not stimulants) like the methyl donors [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=185&category_id=11&keyword=same]SAMe[/url] and [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] are a good start. Of course optimal diet, exercise and mental stimulation are very important as well. I also advise homeopathic care (even without overt symptoms) for these patients.

    This [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/389-what-can-i-do-if-my-cat-has-a-serious-viral-infection?]article[/url] might help further.

    Close monitoring by you and your vet is essential in cats with FIV.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Nosodes #5550

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question Ginny. Nosode use does NOT cause a titer. I would love to see any documentation of this. The few studies that scientifically studied this question are pretty clear about this. The titers of unvaccinated animals taking nosodes result from natural exposure.

    Nosodes confer protection either by temporarily filling the susceptibility of the infectious disease or by acting as curative remedies. The latter case however is typically not the case when nosodes are used routinely. This [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/491-do-i-really-need-to-vaccinate-my-pet-every-year?]article[/url] by Dr. Susan Wynn (who coauthored one of the studies I mentioned) also provides some insight.

    HTH.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Need a good diet suggestion for 2 lb Maltese with elevated ALT #5536

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sorry for the slow reply. It would be very helpful to know what the ultrasound revealed (if anything).

    Prior to the last ALT, was she exposed to anything different than usual? New cleaning products, paint fumes, carpet/bed, etc.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: coping with loss #5535

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I’m so sorry for your loss but am very glad that your had such a wonderfully long life.

    In time, your grief will fade to be replaced by loving memories of his life with you.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat is not eating after diet change #5188

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Most important is getting him to eat. Try warming his food a bit. Doing so increases the palatability of the food.

    For liver support there are many botanicals that can be supportive. Silymarin is most common. I typically use it in the Rx Vitamin’s HepatoSupport liquid or capsule. DMG, SAMe, etc. have all proven useful.

    In addition, Rx Vitamins now makes Formula HL specifically formulated for supporting the feline liver (especially for patients being tube fed because of Hepatic Lipidosis).

    One of my own cats (Chi) is just now getting back to “normal” eating. He barely ate for almost 1 week. It was both frustrating and dangerous. Fortunately, he responded fully to a homeopathic remedy.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Referrals – Haddam CT #5168

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi again Luca-

    Unfortunately, I don’t know any good holistic vets in your lovely part of CT. I do know however that there is a specialty hospital in Cheshire. They might be OK for you.

    Whether a particular doc is open-minded or not is very individual and not necessarily dependent on medical training. I know plenty of “holistic” practitioners that still use drugs, but are very happy to work with myself and other vet homeopaths.

    Consider as well, a nearby vet who may not be holistic per se, but is willing to work with you, by becoming a member of your vet team, and respect your decision to treat homeopathically (or however best indicated).

    Have a great Sunday.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat is not eating after diet change #5167

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Luca. NO! I would not continue to wait him out.

    Since he is already losing weight I’d be very concerned that he could develop secondary problems from insufficient nutrients. Cats are prone to disorders like development of a fatty liver (hepatic lipidosis) from not eating.

    Have you tried feeding canned foods? It’s a big jump from the highly palatable dry foods (which cats should not be eating IMO) to a fresh food diet. Canned foods can help ease the transition.

    I also suggest that you read some of the other fresh food articles on this site especially that by Dr. Pierson. Her site [url=http://www.catinfo.org]catinfo.org [/url]is an excellent source for info.

    In addition to her suggestions, I find that crumbling Wysong’s freeze-dried Dream Treats on most any food will improve palatability. These are available from most pet food stores.

    Also, Vital Essentials now offers individually packaged (raw) cat food. I haven’t tried it yet (nor have my cats), but it’s supposed to be very tasty.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff (down the road in Weston, CT!)


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for posting your question Amy. I’m sorry about the delay in getting back to you. The past few weeks have been occupied with patient care and getting ready for next weekend’s vote by the AVMA to discourage the practice of vet homeopathy.

    I typically advise feeding a wide variety of foods to my patients vs. one or another recipe. When feeding fresh food, balance is achieved with variety (much as for you and I). Commercial foods need to be balanced because they are designed to be fed throughout the life of the animal.

    I commonly see clients who think that they are doing a great job by feeding fresh food, but are not feeding a balanced diet, e.g. toy dogs fed chicken breast + rice (or whatever is in the recipe) day in and out. Calcium imbalances (inadequacy) is most common as muscle meats are high in the mineral phosphorus and need to be balanced with calcium. My favorite calcium sources are eggshells and certain seaweeds.

    This being said, there are a number of books and other sources available for dog food recipes. There are many in Dr. Pitcairn’s book among others. Dr. Strombeck is the original guru of veterinary gastroenterology (the study of stomach, intestinal and other abdominal diseases) and he is also a big advocate for home cooked diets. His info is even now available for [url=http://dogcathomeprepareddiet.com/]free online[/url].

    Personally I think that many of these recipes are too high in carbohydrates and still advocate [url=https://www.homevet.com/diet-discussion]variety (and moderation and freshness)[/url]. Also consider commercially available fresh food diets (typically dehydrated or dried) such as those from The Honest Kitchen, ZiwiPeak and Wysong Archetype.

    I’d also reduce some of those expensive supplements and stick with a good multivitamin (I like the on from Rx Vitamins, but there are many available) vitamin C and sporadic cranberry extract (to reduce UTIs). Even this is not critical if you feed a wide, fresh variety.

    Regarding the crystals in his urine and UTIs, be sure to promote excellent hydration by adding extra fluids to his diet and avoiding dry dog foods. The kind of crystals and specifics of the UTIs may help decide on realize ingredients. He also may not be fully emptying his bladder when he urinates associated with his paralysis and nerve/muscle weakness. This would predispose both to crystals and UTIs.

    Good luck! I wish you and Dexter a great New Year.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #5119

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    No side-effects of nosodes per se. Rote repetition of any remedy however (nosodes need to be repeated on a schedule to possibly confer protection) can bring out other symptoms that may be lurking beneath the surface. There also is the remote possibility, if the individual is sensitive to the nosode and/or it is repeated often enough, of some transient “proving” symptoms associated with the specific nosode.

    I personally prefer to treat on an individual basis vs. using a protocol (of any kind).

    The risk of infection reduces as the immune system matures (which it usually is by 1 year). However if the exposure to the infectious agent is great enough this can overwhelm almost any immune system (at any age).

    My bottom line message is to promote the best overall health of your puppies to maximize immune protection. It is best to work with a trained vet homeopathy to learn more about all of your options.

    Have a happy and healthy New Year.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #5093

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Excellent point about gradual exposure. This indeed is the best way for the pups to develop natural titers.

    However, since one of the pups will have a high level of exposure, consider running titers and starting preventative treatment early. Nosodes can indeed also be more useful in situations like this.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #5091

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Fantastic question Ellen.

    In my opinion, the most effective method (aside from reducing exposure to sick animals and epidemics, etc.) for preventing infectious disease is by fostering a strong immune system.

    This can be accomplished in many ways. I counsel my new clients to use the freshest (most vital) diet possible, maximize exercise, outside air, socialization and to minimize stressors. In addition, and extremely critical, is recognizing the early warning signs (some of which are mentioned in the link above) of internal imbalance.

    Once these are discerned, the totality of the patient can be addressed homeopathically by a well-trained professional homeopathic vet.

    I hope that makes sense to you. Feel free to write if I need to clarify.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #5089

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi again Ellen. I am not currently using nosodes for prevention in my practice.

    In general they are given routinely, e.g. on a weekly or monthly basis. There are many published “protocols”.

    Sorry that I can’t be of more help.

    Happy holidays!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Protecting a puppy without vaccines #5056

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your message Ellen.

    My first and foremost question about protection from infectious diseases is whether you are working with an experienced homeopathic (or other) vet?

    You are absolutely correct about nosodes. Used improperly, they can cause problems.

    I would NOT consider your second option (of doing nothing).

    If you opt to do nothing (which I don’t advise), the answer to how long to minimize exposure to other dogs (and potentially Parvo) has to be individualized to your dog’s situation, e.g. did the dam pass on maternal antibodies, are there any [url=https://www.homevet.com/component/k2/item/483]common but abnormal[/url] early warning signs in your new pup (clues to an unhealthy immune system), severity of the Parvo epidemic, etc.

    I look forward to your reply. I know that other pet owners have the same questions and I appreciate your asking them here.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Referrals #4967

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sorry for the delay in replying Teresa. I was waiting to hear from a colleague who practices closer to your area.

    She said that Dr. Nero (in Danbury) is open-minded as is Dr. Stone (in Watertown). The latter’s practice however is more dogcentric. I have had other clients who have worked with them both for exams and diagnostics along with homeopathic consultations.

    Have a great Sunday.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dental cleanings #4921

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Shana-

    Thanks so much for posting here. I really appreciate your sharing this question with every other dentally concerned pet owner.

    You are absolutely right to be concerned. Mateasers (and many other small breeds) are indeed predisposed to dental problems. I recently saw one of my Maltese patients who only has 2 teeth left (granted, he’s 16 with neurologic and liver disease so his mouth is a relatively small issue). Losing teeth, periodontal disease, etc. are “epidemic” among this population.

    I strongly advise having your local vet examine her teeth if this has not been done recently. If the problem is early then manual care at home including active chewing and tooth brushing, non-anesthetic cleaning, Neem bark powder, Proden Plaqueoff, etc. can all be helpful.

    If dental disease has already progressed, these modifications to Claire’s oral hygiene are best started after dental x-rays and a cleaning (+/- extractions based on both visible periodontal disease as well as x-ray results) are performed by your vet or a vet dental specialist.

    Interestingly, Dr. Tom Lonsdale (an Australian vet) is emphatic that dogs do not develop dental disease in the first place if they are fed his RMB (raw meaty bone) diet. My experience corroborates this observation (as long as the patient isn’t too over vaccination which can cause oral diseases in and of itself).

    Good luck, and have a great day.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: SKIN PROBLEM #4845

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Have you tried the fresh food (or any other) diet?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: SKIN PROBLEM #4837

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi. What is Bozi eating? Have you tried delaying the initial Heartgard treatment in the Spring to see if he still becomes itchy? How often do you give the ivermectin, and do you see any change in his itchiness (or anything else) when you do?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: regarding Roscoe #4829

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Lynne. Yes, I agree. His skin *is* bothering him. What I mean is that he is probably feeling a sporadic itching or pain coming from his skin. Almost like something is crawling on him (like phantom phleas).

    What are you feeding? How long has this been going on? Any other issues aside from his urinary problems?

    In general, my experience with homeopathic treatment of allergies and feline hyperesthesia syndrome (which this may be) is quite good. However, homeopathic treatment depends on the totality of the symptoms, e.g all of his past history as well as lots of details that you can not supply spontaneously.

    Have a great evening.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Reversing adverse medical effects #4806

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    So sorry for the slow reply Monica. Max does indeed have a lot going on. I agree that homeopathic treatment is his best bet to help resolve his problems.

    Unfortunately, treatment would need to be strictly individualized (based on A LOT more info than you can provide here). It may also take many months just to get his vitality to respond to homeopathic stimulation.

    If you want to try starting to unravel Max’s internal energetic imbalance, you can find my new client info by clicking on the green tab above. Regardless of our consulting, it’s important to keep Max on the freshest food possible and to minimize his exposure to environmental toxins, vaccines, drugs, etc.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Feeding raw food frozen ? #4767

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for posting Julie. When I was feeding Vanya (my SP which is one of the breeds predisposed to bloat) I was thinking further about your question.

    Still no published research response, but I forgot to mention an important factor where the temp. of the food may play a bigger role.

    I was feeding V a partially frozen raw meat dinner. However, she is a relatively delicate and slow eater. There is enough contact with her tissues and warm secretions that I’m not too concerned about the cold food. If however she was a gulper, I’d be more worried.

    I just add this additional thought. Hopefully others will also reply (and I’ll keep looking).

    in reply to: Perrianal Fistulas and Yeast overgrowth on skin 9 yr old GSD #4563

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your detailed message. In my experience, perianal fistulas are secondary to an imbalanced immune system. In your dog this has taken many disparate forms (see my common vs. abnormal info).

    As you probably know, the yeast overgrowth is also secondary to immune problems. Of course immune suppressants (like cyclosporine or corticosteroids) also have to be factored in. Therefore your first step is to do everything possible to enhance immune function.

    Fresh (energy rich) food is most important. Sunshine, exercise, mental stimulation, etc. are also extremely important. Reduce toxic exposures, e.g. insecticides, cleaning products, etc.

    There are many supplements that can aid the immune function and help in this situation, e.g. omega-3 fatty acids from *fish*, but they will not cure the problem.

    I’d also strongly urge you to consult a trained and experienced vet homeopath to help and gradually return your dog to a “normal” 9 year old. This will be a difficult case so your persistence with treatment is essential.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help for scared cat on way to vet in the car #4252

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Beth-

    First of all, thank you s so much for providing the invaluable service of posting messages in the “forever homes” folder. I really appreciate it. Personally, I look at the messages every day hoping to find our next rescue dog.

    I wonder if your traumatized by car riding kitty is getting car sick. Any signs of that? Belly noises, salivating, spitting up, looking anxious, etc.?

    Make sure to withhold food and water for a few hours before you travel.

    Regardless of cause, 2-3 drops of Rescue Remedy given every 5-10 minutes as needed should help.

    If this doesn’t work, you can try 1 cc of Cocculus or Tabacum (6, 12 or 30c) solutions. As you know, you can try these from your health food store and try them one at a time.

    Good luck.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy Sunday morning Ginny and Beth-

    Rather than delve into homeopathic medical philosophy, I’d like to keep my reply within the realm of the purely clinical (dare I say scientific) observation.

    Thousands of cases (both animal and human) over the past 200+ years
    have clearly demonstrated one incontrovertible fact. Physical issues are almost always reachable (to use Ginny’s word) by the Vital Force.

    I see clinically “impossible” healing of animal bodies every week in practice, and up close and personal in people every year when I study with a master human homeopath in Montreal. He treats and improves (and often resolves) “incurable” disease such as cancers, neurologic degenerations, psychoses, etc.

    This post is definitely not meant to give you (or anyone) false hope. Homeopathic treatment of severe pathology is very difficult on many levels and requires tremendous commitment and time (often years).

    Unfortunately in animals we sometimes can’t fully discern the true nature of the energetic imbalance which resulted in the pathology. Even in these cases however, in my experience, homeopathic palliation of symptoms can be extremely effective.

    Have a great day. It’s another beautiful (but hot) one here in CT.

    in reply to: Geriatric cats and eating habits #3999

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Exactly! 16 is really not that old for a cat. Many live well into their twenties and some can go way beyond (I believe that 40 something may be the oldest cat on record).

    That being said, the internal energetic imbalance that predisposes animals to get sick (and lose their appetite) increases with age. I’d advise ruling out common age-related biochemical disorders with baseline blood and urine testing.

    Thyroid testing (t4) is indeed part of the minimum database for the older cat. Most(~90%) of hyperthyroid cats are just the opposite of what you are describing however. They tend to eat *more* than usual.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your question Beth as well as your excellent work in helping to find “forever homes”.

    As with any other question about the curability of diseases using homeopathic remedies to stimulate the Vital Force, the answer is that it depends. If the structural change is not beyond the bodies ability to repair, then yes, homeopathy can help.

    The cerebellum (which is the part of the brain that deteriorates in CH) is exquisitely sensitive to external influences (in this case both natural and vaccine-associated feline distemper). It is now well known that the brain is indeed able to “rewire” and heal itself.

    I’d therefore think that some, but certainly not all, cases of CH can be helped homeopathically. It all depends on the severity of the structural change along with the healing ability of the individual.

    As you well know, where there’s life there is hope.

    Have a great evening, and thanks again.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question Beth. There are lots of reasons for inappropriate elimination most of which are related to the cats’ natural inclinations (surface and location preference, etc.).

    Take a look at these for more detailed info:

    [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/465-why-does-my-cat-urinate-or-defecate-outside-of-the-litter-box?][/url]

    [url=http://catinfo.org/?link=litterbox][/url]

    in reply to: Ringworm #3986

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply Dr. Rose’s salve (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=102&category_id=11&keyword=biotic]excellent probiotics[/url], and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    in reply to: Ringworm #3987

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=169&category_id=11&keyword=rose]Dr. Rose’s salve[/url] (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=102&category_id=11&keyword=biotic]excellent probiotics[/url], and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    in reply to: Ringworm #3988

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=169&category_id=11&keyword=rose]Dr. Rose’s salve[/url] (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=102&category_id=11&keyword=biotic]excellent probiotics[/url], and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    in reply to: Ringworm #3984

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply Dr. Rose’s salve (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] excellent probiotics, and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    in reply to: Substances interfering with homeopathic treatment? #3884

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question! The answer is incumbent on when the gel was applied, what potency the Arnica is, as well as when the homeopathic remedy was administered (and which remedy it was).

    It’s usually safer to avoid exposure to more than one remedy at a time (whether orally or otherwise).

    In this particular situation, it is OK as you had mentioned the details elsewhere.

    Have a great night.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Dr. Elsey’s Cat Attract litter and shredded newspapers may work best.

    in reply to: Homeopathy for acutes #3830

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for sharing your experience Ginny. As you well know, acute prescribing is extremely rewarding. The significant symptoms are “in your face” and readily apparent.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question Beth. There are lots of reasons for inappropriate elimination most of which are related to the cats’ natural inclinations (surface and location preference, etc.).

    Take a look at these for more detailed info:

    https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-library/item/465-why-does-my-cat-urinate-or-defecate-outside-of-the-litter-box?

    Feeding Your Cat: Know the Basics of Feline Nutrition


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your input “Turnip”. As Ginny pointed out in her excellent posts, you will have a very long wait for any *published* research. Most natural vet care research nowadays is on a case by case basis. Unfortunately, this “anecdotal” evidence is typically not well-received by academia (tho it is still scientific by definition). Of course, this is what those of us with sick pets care most about.

    You need to weigh all of the evidence provided by all sources to decide on treatment options. Hopefully you have built a strong vet care team.

    Regarding spam, this board often considers any previously formatted text to be spam. I’m so sorry that you have had problems. I know how frustrating this can be.

    Good luck. Please let us know what you find during your further explorations.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great question (and I welcome them all), however I wonder why you ask? Everything seems to be in working order at homevet.com.

    in reply to: selecting a pet #3787

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your post. Although you are advertising dog collars, you bring up a good point. There do seem to be dog people and cat people. My belief however is that these people have just not me the right cat (or dog).

    I will personally always have both dogs and cats (and outside birds, squirrels, chipmunks, etc.). In fact, we just adopted a new kitty a few days ago and we are working with Poodle rescue.

    in reply to: Concerned about diarrhea #3691

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Lacey-

    I’d try a bland diet for a few days (mushy rice/oatmeal and boiled white meat chicken or low fat cottage cheese), If that does the trick, great! You can then start back gradually on their regular diet, but I would omit the chicken skin. My experience is that any [u]*cooked*[/u] skin or even dark meat (or cooked red meat) can cause diarrhea. In general, canned pumpkin and slippery elm can help with diarrhea.

    You should also bring a stool sample to your vet to rule out internal parasites. It would also be a great idea if you consulted with a nutritionally-oriented homeopathic vet to help get both dogs on the best healing path.

    Good luck!


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I forgot to add that I will also post my experiences with the product as they develop. So far, I’ve seen an effect similar to that of other natural products on the market.

    in reply to: Lyme Disease #3632

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [size=200]Fantastic Alicia! The 204K platelets should be fine.

    Have a great night.[/size][size=200]

    in reply to: cardiomyopathy #3631

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Best of luck Dave. It sounds like Zen is in good hands.

    in reply to: Lyme Disease #3628

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks Alicia. A great and rapid clinical response to Lyme treatment is one of the top indicators of a true case of Lyme. Most that I see have had no discernible immediate response.

    My main question now is whether I recall correctly (from Facebook) that he had low platelets. If so, I wonder if the thrombocytopenia is doxy related. How is his platelet count now that he is off doxy?

    Also, please do not think that homeopathic medical treatment eliminates the need for a repeat of Cornell’s Multiplex test (which I think is the best test out there for Lyme in dogs). Homeopathic vets use *all* of the data (including diagnostic test results).

    Be well.

    in reply to: cardiomyopathy #3627

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Dave. Well, first let me say that if you were a local client of mine I would probably not advise euthanasia at this time. Please be sure that any IV fluids (“drip”) are given cautiously since Zen’s heart is not working well.

    It sounds like you have done a great job preserving Zen’s healing ability (plenty of activity, a fresh food hunted diet, no vaccines, etc.).

    An exam and echocardiogram by a cardiologist is definitely indicated.

    Don’t worry initially about the palliative drugs prescribed by the cardiologist. They will just help stabilize Zen while his body recoups. A well-absorbed coenzyme Q-10 supplement, omega-3 fatty acids, Formula CV, etc. will also help him live as normal a life as possible.

    I’d also strongly advise consulting with an experienced vet homeopath to help him heal.

    Please let me know what the echo reveals.

    Good luck! I know that this is a difficult situation. I’m glad that you discovered me on Facebook (how *did* you find me?)!

    in reply to: Lyme Disease #3620

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Alicia! It sounds like your first step with Bandit would be to get him some *good* PRObiotics to combat the ANTIbiotic effects. I use Rx Biotic (powder from Rx Vitamins For Pets) and Probio (capsules from Xymogen).

    Did he have a fever when diagnosed with “Lyme”? Did he respond to the doxy in the first few days of treatment?

    Have a great weekend.

    in reply to: Immune Mediated Thrombocytopenia #3488

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your question. There are lots of homeopathic remedies that are useful in ITP (and most other blood, and other, disorders).

    The selection of the correct remedies in a potentially life-threatening situation such as this needs to be carefully individualized. ITP is not due to an acute (although it may have come on acutely) immune imbalance that is amenable to one remedy or another (like Arnica after a bruise or injury). I therefore can not recommend a specific homeopathic remedy.

    Ideally, you would add a veterinary homeopath to your veterinary healthcare team. S/he will guide you in appropriate integrative therapy using homeopathic medicines as indicated.

    In the meantime, I’d concentrate on helping his body heal by strengthening it through a fresh food diet, plenty of fresh air, sunlight and exercise. Vitamins C, B12, antioxidants (e.g., a grape seed extract like Antiox), Coenzyme Q-10, omega-3 fatty acids, etc.

    You can find certified (and non-certified but trained) veterinary homeopaths at: http://bit.ly/w6iV9I

    Good luck! Please keep us posted on his progress.

    in reply to: Help for eclampsia #3474

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Great questions, as usual, Ginny. Unfortunately I can only give some general answers and ask more questions in this situation.

    It is highly likely that the metabolic calcium demand of lactation is just overwhelming this new mom’s system (and acting as an obstacle to homeopathic treatment). Is this her first litter? Has she had problems before? How much milk is she producing?

    What diet was she eating during gestation and when first nursing? Was calcium being supplemented? What were her specific symptoms of eclampsia, and were there any warning signs?

    I hope that she is doing better at this time. The good news is that the pups are almost able to be weaned (tho I do advise a longer period of nursing when possible).

    Lots of questions…

    Be well.

    in reply to: Cryptorchidism And Vaccines #3473

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks so much for your input Ginny. I totally agree about the possible causes of cryptorchidism. Unfortunately, I am not aware of any studies that confirm anything more than an association in some breeds and lines of dogs, e.g http://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/152/16/502.abstract.

    I do however also feel that this problem is amenable to homeopathic (working with the body) prescribing. I have seen clear temporal associations between administration of a homeopathic remedy and “dropping” of the missing testicle.

    Of course, conventional wisdom says that this was just a “coincidence”.

    So be it. I’ll continue to work with these slow to develop pups.

    Have a great Sunday.

    in reply to: My cats on a raw diet #3415

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks Beth. I agree. That has been my observation as well with my patients. The cats fed a raw variety tend to look and act younger. I advise fresh variety for all of my patients.

    in reply to: Cat won’t eat after moving to a new house #3413

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Moving can be a very traumatic experience for a cat. Not eating well, and acting strangely is very common for upwards of two weeks. Make sure you keep him locked up in your bedroom, and don’t even offer him the opportunity to explore the rest of the house. Feliway spray and diffusers (which deliver a calming pheremone)should help.

    A new, larger home with strange smells and sounds is very overwhelming. Make sure he gets plenty of TLC during this time. After 2 weeks, you can start gradually exposing him to other parts of the house. In addition, I would be concerned about any other underlying internal disorders in a cat of this age. You may want to have a physical examination and CBC, biochemical profile run just to rule out this possibility.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    It sounds like your dog may have a metritis (uterine infection), or other inflammation of the uterus. The most cost-effective option might be to have her spayed ASAP.

    If spaying is out of the question, then she should start a course of medications such as prostaglandin to empty out her uterus. This however, may only prove to be a temporary fix.

    In the meantime, she should be on antibiotics or immune-boosting natural agents such as high dose Vitamin C, echinacea, or a chinese herbal combination like Astra 8.

    Homeopathic treatment can also be effective in this situation, but may take more time and expense.

    in reply to: My cat is grooming herself bald! #3411

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This may be a parasitic, allergic or internal disorder. Frequently, miliary dermatitis (which I believe is the condition you are describing) is primarily allergic. If this was an inhalant or flea allergic condition, I would expect her to respond very well to an appropriate dose of steroids. Since she didn’t respond that well, consider a food allergy, or dietary imbalance. I would start her on a hypoallergenic diet like duck and potato, and add fatty acids and vitamins to her diet. EFA-Z+ provides the full complement of nutrients which her skin needs. Supplement this with one 1,000 mg fish oil capsule per day. Be sure to give this nutritional therapeutic trial at least eight weeks.

    in reply to: Nutrition for my dog with seizures #3410

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    My main concern would be a correlation between the vision disorder, and the seizures. While he is being treated by the neurologist, and properly worked up, you can try some supplementation to help with his problems. Dimethylglycine, taurine,Vitamin A, Vitamin C, euphrasia and other natural supplements have been shown to help with both seizures and vision problems. In addition, certain Traditional Chinese herbs may help his neurological status. My main dietary recommendation is to use the highest quality diet without preservatives possible. Read the ingredients of the food you feed. If grains and byproducts are the main ingredients, you should consider switching. For more diet information read “The Importance of Diet” handout and the pet food articles on this site.

    in reply to: My newborn puppies are dying-please help #3409

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    You need to mix up (goats milk, egg, karo syrup/molasses) or obtain some puppy milk replacer, and a bottle immediately. If newborn puppies don’t nurse every couple of hours, they will die (as you have unfortunately already seen). They also can’t regulate their temperatures, so they must be kept in a very warm environment of at least 80 degrees. The milk replacer must also be luke warm, just like when feeding a human baby. If the pups are now too weak to even bottle feed, then they will have to be tube fed at first. Your local vet can show you how to do this if necessary.

    in reply to: Older dog with fatty tumors #3402

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Fatty tumors, or lipomas, are a very common age-related manifestation. They are not serious, and usually should not be removed unless they are causing a physical problem due to their location, or if they are rapidly growing or changing (and are not improving i response to the homeopathic remedy). In Western medicine there is no good explanation for why these (or other) tumors grow. In Eastern medicine however, they are considered an area of “entangled Qi” due to improper flow of energy through the channels. There are Chinese and Western herbs for straightening out this energy flow problem.

    in reply to: Puppy with a skin lump #3401

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This certainly can be an ingrown hair or whisker. Is it inflamed, or does it seem to bother him at all? I would massage the area and apply warm compresses to try and relieve any pressure within the hair follicles. This will allow any discharge (caused by the inflammation of the skin) if it is present to come out of the tissues, and help break up any other foreign body that may be in there. If the “lump” opens and drains, plain hydrogen peroxide can be used to naturally disinfect the area. Let me know if there is any response to the heat and massage.

    in reply to: Itching and scratching in a Rottweiler #3400

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Where is he itching? Is there any hair loss or flaking anywhere? Any other skin lesions? Certainly allergy is a big cause for itchiness, but all other causes such as skin parasites need to be ruled out first.

    What do you feed, and what do you use as treats?

    Thanks for your re: You wrote. To answer
    your questions no his skin flakeing,no
    lesions but, there is hair loss on his
    back. The food he eat’s is as follows
    Pro Visoins,pro plan dry mixed with hot
    water once a day. His treats are called
    Team Treats dog biscuits. As you know
    our vet is treating him for allergies
    with a needle and type of strroied pill.
    The needle does not do much but the pill
    stops the iching but also knocks him out.
    When on this pill he wets the floor,
    he can never get enough water, he just
    not right.
    If he responds fully to the steroid (stops itching altogether) then you should think about starting a fatty acid-antihistamine combination which will allow you to wean him off the steroid (which is the reason he has such a tremendous thirst, and of course the more he drinks, the more he will urinate).

    I find a combination of a product called EFA-Z+ and hydroxyzine work well, but I’m sure that your vet has some combination which he uses. In either case, start the fatty acid-antihistamine, and supplement this with four 1,000 mg fish oil capsules per day (reduce to two/day after two weeks).
    I also usually treat my itchy patients homeopathically. Allergy is basically a hypersensitivity of the immune system. Once balanced, the allergic triggers don’t cause a problem.

    in reply to: Kitten throat spasms or coughing? #3399

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    No need to worry. Cats are prone to a peculiar form of laryngeal spasm which can be distressing to watch, but is not dangerous. Sometimes the inciting cause is a hairball, or dust particle in the back of the throat which induces spasming of the larynx and the resulting typical signs: crouching down with his head out, neck extended and non-productive retching/coughing in a spasmodic fashion. Occasionally this can also be seen with allergy, and feline asthma.

    The only “treatment” I have found to be effective is gently massaging the larynx (throat area) talking to him in a soothing tone, and *not* panicking.

    in reply to: My kittens can’t drink #3398

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Try using milk instead of water. Make sure it is luke warm, but not too hot. After they start lapping the milk, start diluting it with water. Realize as well that they are probably getting plenty of water through the moisture in the wet food.

    in reply to: Limping Border Collie #3397

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    There are many ways to approach this problem. Since an orthopedic specialist has been unable to help, I would advise starting a program of either homeopathy, Western supplements, or using Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (diet, herbs and/or acupuncture). What is your dog’s diet? Any favorite treats? Is he worse at any certain times, or in the cold? What is his overall demeanor? Is he outgoing, introverted, happy or shy? All of these “constitutional” individualities can provide clues to a holistic vet for helping your dog.

    in reply to: Nervous cat licking her hair off #3396

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Excessive licking is usually a sign of either an allergic, or psychogenic problem. If there are any predisposing factors like fleas, or wool bedding, I would eliminate them first before deciding that this is a psychological problem. Your vet can tell by examination whether there are any primary skin lesions possibly associated with an underlying disorder. If she is a nervous cat under usual circumstances, then the licking may very well be another manifestation of her nervousness. Since you have done everything possible to minimize stress in her environment, you may have to resort to calming herbs or medications. A trial of 2 mg chlorphenaramine twice a day (an over the counter antihistamine) may help in either case. Valerian, and Kava Kava are two western herbs that have calming properties. Also the Bach flower remedy “Rescue Remedy” or “Calming Essence” may help as well. The calming pheremones in Feliway diffusers and spray may also help.

    in reply to: Can I help my dog with lymphosarcoma? #3395

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    (SEE BELOW!!)

    I’m so sorry to hear about your dog. The diagnosis of lymphoma is best made by a biopsy rather than an aspirate (the former gives a much bigger test sample for the pathologist to read than the latter), however her response to the steroid indicates that this is indeed the likely diagnosis. I would strongly consider starting her on a chemotherapy protocol right away. The dramatic response to the steroid alone shows that she will likely be very responsive to the chemotherapy drugs. The odds of a remission on chemotherapy are good when treating lymphoma, and dogs don’t suffer the same side effects that we do. All of my clients who have treated their lymphoma dogs with chemotherapy would do it again. The quality and potential quantity of her life if she achieves remission will be excellent. I do advise that you talk to your vet about his experience with chemotherapy protocols, and if he is not comfortable, then you should see an internist or oncologist who is.

    [b]NB: I have included this archived reply by me because it reflects my thinking 15 years ago as well as the current conventional approach. However, it is almost 2012 and I am older (and hopefully) wiser . Nowadays I do not advise chemotherapy to many of my clients. There are situations where it may be indicated but every patient needs to be approached as an individual. Lymphoma is still one of the most responsive cancers depending on the stage and cell type (B or T cell). I personally would probably treat my own pet with lymphoma using nutritional and homeopathic means.[/b]

    in reply to: My cat is vomiting #3386

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    What did the endoscopic biopsies show? If everything else has been ruled out then you need to be concerned about a food intolerance and/or a motility disorder. My therapeutic plan would be as follows: No food at all for twenty-four hours. If there have been no gastrointestinal signs by the end of the fast, then you can reintroduce very small portions of a bland, high quality food such as Stage 1 baby food or a home-cooked wet rice mixture (regular rice cooked with twice the amount of water for double the amount of time until it is a “mushy” consistency; mix three parts of this with one part boiled white meat turkey or pork). Give him only one tablespoon at a time, several times throughout the day. The fast followed by the small frequent feedings will allow the cells lining his gastrointestinal tract to heal themselves. You can then gradually increase the quantities given at each meal up to 1/4 cup twice a day. At this point, if he is still doing well, then you should consult a trained vet homeopath for further care.

    in reply to: My old dog urinates in her sleep. #3385

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    It is impossible to say whether the incontinence while sleeping is related to a common, estrogen-responsive geriatric problem, a urinary infection, or due to some internal disorder such as kidney disease, Diabetes Mellitus etc. As a canine senior citizen, I would advise having some baseline bloodwork run. These results will allow your vet to treat her for the appropriate condition.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Unfortunately, you have a breed of dog which is frequently fraught with allergies. If your vet has ruled out parasitic skin disease with skin scrapings and cultures, then we can assume that she is suffering from allergic skin disease. If the itching subsides if your vet gives a steroid, then I would aggressively pursue anti-allergic treatment. Does she have a wool blanket or bed which she puts her head on that could be exacerbating the itching. If so, or if there is any other environmental factor you can identify, get rid of it/them. If you aren’t able to eliminate any underlying causes then I would start her on a hypoallergenic diet, i.e.,. a protein source to which she has never been exposed like duck or venison, appropriate vitamins and fatty acids such as those present in the veterinary product EFA-Z+ supplemented with two 1,000 mg fish oil capsules per day. Also the natural antiinflammatories quercetin and bromelain can be very useful. Therapeutic cool oatmeal baths can help the itching temporarily, and I would follow them up with a creme rise using the veterinary product “Relief”. This creme rinse contains oatmeal and a topical antihistamine which work quite well. Speaking of antihistamines, you should try and find an oral antihistamine that helps her itching. Chlorphenaramine, diphenhydramine, and hydroxyzine or one of the others will almost certainly provide some symptomatic relief. Also, the Chinese herbal formulation Xanthium Relieve Surface works well in some dogs.

    Good luck. This is a chronic problem, and you might want to consider internal energetic treatment with homeopathy. It can both relieve the underlying cause for the itch as well as reduce further problems inherent in this breed.

    in reply to: My cat is licking bald spots in her coat #3382

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Barbara’s cat did indeed respond to the DHEA we started a few months ago. My first inclination with your cat however would be to check out the levels of fatty acids and vitamins in the Pet Derm since I am not familiar with this supplement. In addition, feeding *any* dry cat food is exacerbating the dryness (dry food promotes sub clinical dehydration in addition to being deficient in good fatty acids). You may be describing a classic allergic alopecia due to the dramatic response to the steroid (Barbara’s cat did not respond to a diagnostic steroid injection). In addition to omega-6 fatty acids, I would be using fish oils, and other natural antiinflammatories such as quercetin and bromelain. You may also want to try a different hypoallergenic diet since many cats will not respond to d/d since lamb is now such an integral part of many diets (thereby not making it “hypoallergenic” anymore). Is there anything in the environment present during the winter months that isn’t there in the summer, such as a wool blanket, to which he could be reacting?

    in reply to: Itchy and scaly spots near my cat’s spine #3381

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    You are describing a classic seborrheic/allergic skin disease. If parasitic skin disease has been ruled out, you have a few options. The fastest (but least advisable) one is to have your vet administer a diagnostic steroid injection to further confirm this etiology. If the itch disappears as I believe it will, then you need to start your cat on a fatty acid/vitamin supplement such as EFA-Z+. Using a topical spray such as Relief spray will help moisturize the area and reduce the itch immediately. In addition, the over the counter antihistamine chlorphenaramine may also provide rapid relief. Give 2-4 mg twice a day. These therapies might help right away, but I strongly advise addressing the underlying imbalance that is causing this immune hypersensitivity. This can be accomplished with the help of a trained veterinary homeopath.

    in reply to: Swolllen leg after heartworm treatment #3380

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Merial’s Immiticide (when it is available) is the most effective heartworm treatment on the market. The swelling of the leg may be related to thrombosis (blood clot) due to the heartworm disease or treatment.

    in reply to: I have questions about adopting a stray dog #3379

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I would advise avoiding vaccination at this time. Distemper and parvo titers (antibody levels)can be run to see if she already has immune (antibody-mediated) protection. Your vet will be able to give you a rough idea of her age, and breed(s). There are also (fairly accurate) genetic panels that can be run if you want even more info. If she started bleeding on Christmas day, then she actually will be able to become pregnant 7-10 days after this point. The full heat cycle lasts about 21 days, but most dogs only bleed for the first 5-7 days.

    in reply to: My dog gets lame after playing. Is it hip dysplasia? #3378

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Pain and weakness after running does not always mean dysplasia. Does he ever limp? Does he ever hold up any of his legs? Does he sometimes have a hard time getting up after resting for awhile?

    Although a single Ascriptin (aspirin with Maalox) is safe and effective to give as a home remedy, I am not a big fan of chronic aspirin use in a dog this young. Excellent non-specific musculoskeletal remedies include a veterinary product called glycoflex, which contains chondroitin sulfate, an important component of joint regeneration, (it also contains alfalfa, and brewers yeast), yucca extract, omega fatty acids, and my favorites, Trixsyn (hyaluronate), glucosamine sulfate and grape seed extract (Antiox). These products can be used preventively, but higher doses can also be used in acute situations.

    I strongly advise having some hip x-rays done to assess his hips, and starting constitutional homeopathic treatment with a certified veterinary homeopath. Also, a Lyme (and other tick-borne disease) titer may be useful.

    in reply to: My dog is lethargic, not eating, and covered with hives! #3377

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hives are generally a skin manifestation of an allergic reaction. It sounds like he had a generalized reaction to either an environmental, or dietary allergen (or a bug bite if you are in the western or southern US). These reactions are characterized by hives, not eating, vomiting and diarrhea.

    The most important thing we can do is to identify the allergen. Did he have exposure to anything unusual? Any new foods, wool carpeting, furniture, cleaning products? Anyway, I’m sure you get the idea.

    Symptomatically, 25-50mg benadryl given when he manifests the hives and then again in eight hours should help. Homeopathic Apis 6, 12 or 30c may also be indicated (it is derived from bees and may manifest hive-type eruptions).

    Let me know if you come up with any potential allergens.

    in reply to: My Dog Is Obsessed With Food! #3366

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This obsession with food is fairly common in domestic dogs. It is often related to feeding dry dog foods with lots of fillers. It is not due to her sex or breed. Certainly the quantities of food which you are feeding are more than sufficient (though you may want to try feeding fresh instead of processed food), but she is using food both as a means of getting attention, and as a focus for her excess energy. Ideally, and I realize that this is not practical, she should be getting two hours of exercise everyday. This does not mean taking a walk with you, but rather running and playing, preferably with other dogs in a fenced in safe environment. The excess energy she has due to not receiving enough exercise is being diverted into her gluttony. Do you feed her twice a day? Have you tried supplementing her diet with raw meaty bones? These can help tremendously to expend her energy in a natural manner. They are available from your local butcher or online. She will love them, and hopefully this will be enough to get her mind off of eating all the time.

    In general, feeding a species-appropriate diet such as raw meaty bones (see the work of vet Dr. Tom Lonsdale) can eliminate this and many other diet-related problems.

    in reply to: Guinea Pig With a Lump #3365

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    In an older guinea pig such as yours, I would be most concerned about a subcutaneous tumor or abscess. How long has the lump been there, and has it grown at all? Is your g.pig acting normally? How’s his appetite? Any weight loss? If the lump does not grow, and he is acting fine, I would leave it be. If on the other hand he is acting sick, or the lump is growing, you will need to have it aspirated to rule out an abscess, or malignant tumor.

    in reply to: My Greyhound Is Having Seizures #3364

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    A six year old Greyhound that has just started having seizures makes me very concerned about an underlying metabolic or neurologic cause. Idiopathic epilepsy starting at this age is certainly possible, but less likely than if he were younger when the seizures began. Primary metabolic, infectious, e.g. lyme, Babesia etc. and other primary neurologic causes need to be ruled out. Since you are talking about MRI, I presume he has already had a complete blood count, biochemical profile, bile acid tolerance test and tick serology. GME is certainly a possibility as well, and can be ruled out with a CSF tap which your vet can perform in the office.

    In the meantime, I would consider seeking the opinion of a Board Certified neurologist since the vision loss is almost certainly related to the seizures. Have corticosteroids been tried? If so, what was the response? GME and other inflammatory brain disorders are *very* steroid sensitive, and if referral is not in the near future, you may want to consider a diagnostic trial once the other metabolic and infectious conditions have been ruled out. Personally, I manage these cases holistically and with homeopathic treatment.

    in reply to: Should I Have My Dog’s Skin Lump Removed? #3363

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    If this lump has been growing slowly over a period of years, it is probably some sort of skin tumor. Is the growth hard or soft? Does it move around, or stay in one place? Your vet can do a needle aspirate (a type of biopsy) of the mass to try and determine whether he thinks it should be removed. Personally, I try to never remove external growths on my pets as they often serve a purpose.

    in reply to: I Think My Kitten Has Hairballs. What Should I Do? #3362

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Are you sure the gagging is from hairballs? Has he ever thrown up a hairball? Aside from brushing and lubricants, I have had excellent success using enzymes to dissolve hairballs internally. To start, I would buy some papaya enzymes and give him one/day. If there is no improvement increase to two/day. Let me know how this works for you. I’m sure your cat would *love* raw hamburger, but I don’t think it would be a reliable way to make him vomit.

    in reply to: My Dog Has Heart Failure. How Can I Help Him? #3361

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    It is important to know the inciting cause of the CHF. If it is due to mitral insuffucientcy (the most common cause of heart disease), then diuretics, vasodilators, etc. will help tremendously. If she is overweight, it is very important to start a gradual weight loss program. There are some well researched supplements that can also help along with homeopathic remedies. Things like Formula CV http:www://homevet.com/supplements-i-use?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=36&category_id=15&manufacturer_id=9, omega-3 fatty acids, Coenzynme Q-10 30mg once or twice a day is an excellent natural way to help cardiac contractility. Again, I really can’t make any other specific recommendations without knowing the etiology of the heart failure. Perhaps you can call Dr. Gary Wood who is a veterinary cardiologist in Portland. I don’t have his # handy, but I’m sure he is in the book.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This is a great question. I would work on increasing your dogs clearance of the heartworms. Most of the adults should have died off by now, but something is preventing your dog from converting to negative.

    Consider fresh food feeding, antioxidants and other supplements as indicated. I have also successfully treated heartworm positive dogs with homeopathy. You may also want to consult a veterinary cardiologist due to the chronicity of this “infection”. I will be happy to consult with your vet if you decide to approach this problem holistically.

    in reply to: Can I Help My 4 Dogs With Heartworm Disease in Peru? #3359

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I am sorry for the problems you are currently having. How was the diagnosis of heartworm confirmed? When the disease is diagnosed in an uncommon area such as yours it is critical to have the microfilaria confirmed as Dirofilaria, not Dipetalonema (a common error). Dipetalonema is not pathogenic, but can be easily mistaken for Dirofilaria (under the microscope Dirofilaria larvae move and appear differently than Dipetalonema). If Dirofilariasis is confirmed then Rhone Merieux makes a product called Immiticide which is very safe and effective in killing adult heartworms. Unfortunately, if there has been extensive damage from the worms in the heart and pulmonary arteries then the dog can be in for a long haul, even once the adult heartworms have been killed. In this (and especially early disease), homeopathy can help stimulate healing.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sounds like your dog doesn’t like to go out in the rain (who does?). If this happens even when it’s not raining, you may want to consider re-housebreaking your dog. This involves not allowing free access to the house when you’re not around, and taking her outside frequently. I use a product called “Zero Odor” https://www.homevet.com/supplements-i-use?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&category_id=11&product_id=165 for cleaning up pet accidents, The best way to deter her is to keep her restricted, and off the rugs when you’re not around to take her out. You might also want to read my house training handout.

    in reply to: What Should I Feed My Older Cats? #3357

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This is an excellent question to which there unfortunately is not a good answer.
    There are many hypotheses about the increasing incidence of hyperthyroidism. Some vets think that the incidence is not actually increasing, but we are recognizing it more often because of our heightened perception of the disease. Others believe there is a viral, dietary, or genetic answer. Personally I believe that there is a dietary etiology, that is, some type of goitrogen in the diet. This is just my opinion. There are definitely clusters of hyperthyroidism in certain households such as you are experiencing. I would stop the Science Diet, and switch to a fresh food diet or one of the all natural cat foods without artificial preservatives, and high quality ingredients. A frozen raw diet works well for many cats. Some however won’t eat the food raw, but will eat it cooked. Cooked unprocessed (fresh) food in variety and moderation is very important. I do NOT recommend the new diet that ostensibly treats hyperthyroidism in cats.

    In addition I would have your cat tested at least once a year for any geriatric diseases including hyperthyroidism. This way, if a disease is caught early, the secondary complications can be prevented.

    in reply to: horrific flatulence #3346

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Flatulence is frequently directly related to the diet and or an internal imbalance. What do you feed, and what do you use as treats? The stiffness may be another sign of an imbalance. Have you had a stool sample checked for parasites including Giardia and Coccidia? At this age I would advise a full workup with a CBC, biochemical profile and bile acid test to rule out underlying disorders. As a symptomatic approach, you can try a fast for twelve to twenty-four hours followed by feeding of small amounts of a bland diet like low fat cottage cheese and rice (no dog food or treats). If this helps, then after three days you can try adding back small amounts of his regular diet, and see if the flatulence recurs.

    in reply to: diet and cat urinary problem #3345

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Sounds like he is still having a lower urinary tract problem. Are you giving dry or canned food? Is this C/D? I would only be using canned food only, with additional water added to the diet to promote clearing of the urine. What did his latest urinalysis show? Were there crystals, and if so, what kind? He is almost certainly going outside of the box now because he is still having urinary difficulties, and not because he smells infection. For more information you should read my related handout located at: https://www.homevet.com/component/k2/item/381-what-causes-cystitis-or-fus-or-flutd?.

    in reply to: skin problem in Greyhound #3344

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Greyhounds have very sensitive skin, and this time of year flakiness is *very* common. The Vitamin E is a great start, and the dose is fine, but she needs a balance of essential fatty acids, Vitamin A, Zn, biotin etc. for proper skin health. Instead of using multiple products, I use a veterinary supplement called EFA-Z+ which supplies it all. In addition, I would supplement the EFA-Z with 2 fish oil capsules/day.

    Daily brushing, and proper diet are also essential.

    What does the topical moisturizer contain? Although this is an excellent way of revitalizing the skin, some products can actually make matters worse.

    in reply to: my cat may have a urinary problem #3343

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Has Monroe ever had signs of lower urinary tract disease before? It is somewhat unusual for a cat with *just* FLUTD (FUS) to run a fever. Personally, at this point at his age I would want to work him up with x-rays, bloodwork and urinalysis to rule out other disorders. The urinary signs may very well just be secondary to some other condition such as a pyelonephritis (kidney infection) or infiltrative urinary tract disease. As far as hepatic lipidosis, which is the liver disease to which you refer, this only occurs sporadically after a long fast. Is he a big cat that happens to weigh eighteen pounds, or is he overweight? Obese cats are predisposed to this condition, but again, it occurs only sporadically. I would be more concerned with the signs which he is showing now. You should not be giving him any dry food whatsoever at this point, and mixing additional water in with his wet food to promote diuresis. My FLUTD handout in the pet care library goes into this topic in more detail. As far as the vomiting and diarrhea is concerned, it is most likely secondary to the antibiotics. You may want to try giving them with food, or cut back to just once a day. Also, I would advise using a different flavor of wet cat food since there is some older evidence that fish can exacerbate FLUTD.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Yes in large amounts it can theoretically be harmful because onions can cause Heinz body anemia in the cat. Using it as a treat is fine.
    >
    >I can’t find your short diet handout and the link about specific pet foods which explains how to read labels on pet foods, is it in the Pet Food investigative report, cause I’ve already read it all?.
    >
    The “importance of diet” (How Important is Diet in Keeping My Pet Healthy and Preventing Illness?) primer can be found in my diet library along with lots of other useful info.

    >Should one cook a homemade diet or serve it raw (the meat, veggies and fruit) and must I add supplements or without when it is served raw?

    Ideally, you would use raw, but some pets can’t tolerate this, and so steaming of the vegetables, and light cooking of the meats might be necessary. Realize however, that any fresh foods (lightly cooked or raw) will improve the health of your cat.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Vaccine-associated fibrosarcomas tend to be extremely locally aggressive (as you already know). My primary suggestions at this point would be to make sure that you are using adequate doses of shark cartilage (8-10 *grams*/day), vitamin C, 1 gram/day, a natural diet, and I also use chinese herbs appropriate to the individual patient (to determine this would take much more information).

    To avoid the high doses of shark cartilage, I use bovine tracheal cartilage which is effective at 1/8th the dose, i.e. 1- 750mg capsule bovine tracheal cartilage twice a day. Also, I prefer to use a “by-product” from cows that have already been sacrificed rather than killing sharks to obtain their cartilage.

    in reply to: Advice for cat with feline leukemia? #3334

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Management of anemia due to Feline Leukemia involves building the blood as well as managing the virus. Does the cat have bone marrow precursors of the red cells? What is his hematocrit? Any peripheral evidence of regeneration? If so, then I would start the cat on iron supplements, 50mg/day, and erythropoietin injections to manage the anemia. From a holistic point of view, a natural, meat-based diet, wheat sprout-derived antioxidants, interferon, Pau D’Arco, and the Chinese herbs present in the Health Concerns formula “Marrow Plus”, are all useful adjuncts. In addition, bone marrow and spleen glandulars are very helpful (present in the product ImmuGo from Pets Friend). It is extremely important that the cat be managed aggresively until he stabilizes.

    in reply to: How can I tell if my dog has a fever? #3333

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    The only way to know for sure whether a dog is running a fever, is by taking a rectal temperature. You can certainly do this at home with a human rectal thermometer inserted about 1-2 inches after coating the tip with vaseline. Leave it in for 1-2 minutes (though a high fever will register in less time). Because dogs have more variable temperatures with normal ranging from ~100-101.5, it is hard to tell just by feel. With that said however, when you suspect a fever, if you can’t take a rectal temperature, try feeling a hairless area such as the inside of the ear, or groin.

    in reply to: Can I help my sick cat with FIV? #3332

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I am so sorry to hear about Apache. It is truly a tragedy when one of our beloved companions becomes terminally ill. How long has he had FIV? How is his quality of life? Blindness and a single seizure does not mean that he is necessarily experiencing any discomfort. Unfortunately, once the disease reaches the brain, it is usually only a matter of weeks before he succumbs. If however his neurologic signs are secondary to the immune response by the body to the disease, then he may very well have a much longer time with you.

    In terms of treatment, I would first and foremost get him off commercial cat food and onto a homemade diet, e.g. blenderized wet rice (this is rice cooked for 2 hours with twice the amount of water as usual until it becomes “mushy”) and turkey, chicken etc. I would also start him on a course of supplements/immune enhancers such as Interferon (which your vet can make up), dimethylglycine, and Pau D’Arco. These are all liquids so they can be administered relatively easily without having to pill him.

    Please read my handouts on feline viruses and coping with the loss of a pet, as these should help as well.

    It is critical to manage any problems that arise immediately so feel free to contact me through the web site anytime.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I would hate to see your daughter put such a young, beloved companion to sleep. FIV in and of itself is not painful, and the signs can be managed as they arise if she is willing to do so. You must realize however that your daughter may be ready to put this cat to sleep, now, and not agonize with a chronically ill cat through all of the emotional ups and downs. The danger to your cats is minimal, especially if you are able to separate them. FIV is transmitted primarily by bite wounds, and is therefore not aseasily acquired as FeLV. If she decides to try and treat, I would start the cat on a high quality, high protein diet such as human baby food (no cat food), or home-cooked wet rice/chicken or turkey with added enzymes. Coenzyme Q-10 10mg/day will help with the gum disease. I would also start her on a course of supplements/immune enhancers such as Interferon (which your vet can make up), dimethylglycine, and Pau D’Arco. These are all liquids so they can be administered relatively easily without having to pill her.

    in reply to: Why does my young cat have loose stools (diarrhea?) for weeks? #3326

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Absolutely! Your breeder is seeing a very common, but NOT normal, symptom in these young cats with diarrhea (and yes, even without increased frequency, loose stools are considered diarrheic).

    I would upgrade his diet and schedule an initial evaluation with a veterinary homeopath. This problem may be strictly dietary, but I’d also strongly recommend having your very young cat fully evaluated (internally).

    A vet homeopath can evaluate and treat both physiologic and energetic imbalances.

    in reply to: What diet should I feed my newly adopted skinny dog? #3325

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    –I would rule out parasitic, and internal diseases like malabsorption/maldigestion. Try feeding her a higher quality diet with wholesome ingredients such as that from Wysong (# 800 748-0188). Supplement it with digestive enzymes like Rx Zyme from Rx Vitamins, and Nupro from Nutripet. This will provide her with everything her body will need to reach her optimum weight. Although she may have a lean ideal body weight, she should not be skin and bones. Coyotes are not genetically predisposed to being underweight, but rather are generally malnourished and therefore scrawny in appearance.

    in reply to: What can I do about my dog eating cat poop? #3324

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Unfortunately, this is a very difficult problem to eradicate. Cat stool is very tasty to dogs. The only way to stop this behavior, is to somehow prevent access to the source. Does your cat use a box in the house, or go to the bathroom outside? If he uses a litter box, then you need to put the box in an area where the pup has no access. I use a bathroom with a chain on the inside of the door, so that it opens wide enough for my cats to get in, but not my dogs. They still will often sit by the door and salivate. Nasty habit, but not unusual or dangerous.

    in reply to: Yellow eye discharge and eye swelling in my dog with entropion #3323

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Entropion will indeed cause discharge and “infection” of the eyes with yellow discharge. When the eyelid rubs against the eye, it causes irritation which is why there is a discharge. Make sure the conjunctivitis ointment does not contain a steroid since he is predisposed to corneal ulcers, and steroids are contraindicated with ulcers. I would be using a plain antibiotic ointment, and hot compresses (run hot water over a wash cloth and wring it out) applied to the eyes twice a day to help him feel better. The definitive answer however is surgery to correct the entropion.


    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Depending on your geographical area, age and weight of your dog, and the location of the undescended testicle (abdominal or inguinal), this seems like a very fair price (NB-in 1997).

    Anyone reading this post nowadays (2011) should realize that even a routine dog neutering often costs more than $245!

    in reply to: Vomiting dog possibly got into antifreeze #3317

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Due to the highly toxic nature of even a small amount of antifreeze, I would rush her to your vet and let him know that she may have licked some snow with antifreeze. It is also certainly possible that she vomited from the turkey table scraps (especially if there was any skin, or dark meat), and the frequency of the vomiting caused stomach irritation with resultant blood. In either case, a trip to your local vet today is warranted.

    in reply to: How much calcium to give my dog? #3316

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I would not be using *any* calcium supplements in a Golden at this age unless you are feeding a raw meat diet. The rationale is that calcium is known to increase the incidence of metabolic bone disease in growing dogs (which he will be doing for another six months). The phosphorus present in red meat however should be balanced with additional calcium. The amount uou should use depends on the makeup of the diet.

    in reply to: How cold is too cold to run with my dog? #3315

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Since your dog likes the cold weather, it is fine for her to run with you. She will tell you if this is a problem for her. Running in the heat on the other hand can be a problem.

    in reply to: Management of chronic renal failure in my cat #3314

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Heidi, thanks for your questions! To properly help manage Beau I need to know the results of his bloodwork, specifically BUN, creatinine, phosphorus, hematocrit, and whatever other results you can supply.

    In general however, feeding a *high quality* lower protein, lower phosphorus diet is critical to his long term quality of life. For home-cooking, see if he will eat white meat chicken or turkey, which can then be added in a 1:4 proportion to “wet” rice (which is rice cooked with double the amount of water, for twice the length of time resulting in a “mush”).

    A good multivitamin source such as Nutrived microencapsulated cat vitamins is also important. Kidney supporting western and chinese herbs, kidney glandulars etc. are all excellent adjuncts.

    It is also critical to monitor his red blood cell count since it is this value along with the presence of kidney toxins in the bloodstream which help maintain his appetite and weight. This is critical since most CRF cats die or are euthanised, not from their underlying disease, but from wasting due to inappetance.

    Depending on the blood values, I also may recommend that you start administering fluids subcutaneously at home. This is a simple procedure but extremely important .

    A urinalysis and urine culture are critical for ruling out the presence of bacteria and other complicating factors such as crystals.

    in reply to: What is the best way to crate train my new pup? #3313

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    First of all, congratulations on your new addition. To answer your last question first, you *definitely* should start crate-training her. It is normal for a pup of this age to wake up at least once during the night to urinate. This is when you should take her out of her crate to urinate, put her back in, and that’s it. No playing, no sweet talk, no treats etc. At this point she knows that if she cries enough, you will eventually come out and play with her. This is rewarding inappropriate behavior. You should consider putting the crate in your room so she can have you nearby for comfort. Realize that it is very traumatic for her to leave the comfort of her brothers and sisters, and you and your family are now her only family. Realize as well that even the getting up once during the night will end soon since she should start sleeping through the night within a few weeks. Hang in there. The joy she will bring to you over the next decade or more is well worth it.

    in reply to: More help needed in crate training my new puppy #3312

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I realize you don’t feel this way right now, but it sounds like Sadie is doing very well. Personally, I had one dog with the same exact problem, and he (Boris) only slept the night in his crate (at first) if the crate was right next to my side of the bed and I kept my hand either on top of, or inside the crate until he fell asleep. As I mentioned previously, loneliness, and yearning for her siblings is the cause for this problem, and she will *eventually* grow out of it no matter what you do. Don’t give in (even though you feel frustrated). I would not change anything that you are doing except as I mentioned previously, and feel free to contact me through the website anytime.

    in reply to: My dog has itching with hair loss. Could it be mange? #3311

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    There is a skin parasite called Demodex which is a type of mite which can cause a loss of hair, and itchiness around the eyes. In addition, allergies can also cause the same signs. Does he tear more than usual from one or both eyes? Your vet should be able to do a skin scraping to determine whether he has demodex or some other skin parasite.

    in reply to: Why does my older deaf cat cry loudly? #3310

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    As cats lose their hearing, they begin to get more vocal, presumably because they are getting less external auditory input. If your cat is totally deaf, then this crying is the only sound she can hear, and is likely doing it for attention from you. Consider yourself lucky at this point. My own cat became partially deaf at 17 years, and howled off and on all evening for the last two years of her life!

    in reply to: Do you have any suggestions to help regulate my diabetic cat? #3309

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Your vet needs to determine whether you are dealing with a problem with insulin resistance or of insulin absorption. I find the easiest way to do this is to run serial blood glucose tests after administration of Regular Humulin insulin. This is the best absorbed form, and if an appropriate dose doesn’t decrease the glucose level significantly, then true insulin resistance should be suspected. Infections, hyperadrenocorticism, acromegaly etc. can all cause insulin resistance. Where do you live? Do you have a veterinary endocrinologist or internist nearby?

    in reply to: What food should I feed my diabetic dog? #3308

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Diet is indeed extremely impportant for the diabetic, and any change you make will likely effect her insulin requirements. I agree that w/d is not the highest quality commercial food you could be feeding, but because of the necessity of keeping the diet consistent, I would not try to switch to home-cooking. I would gradually try switching to a higher quality dry food such as that made by Wysong, and eventually add in fresh vegetables for additional nutrients. I also use a dietary suplement for Diabetics called Glucuril from Phytopharmica which contains chromium, bitter melon extract and other ingredients important for glucose metabolism.

    in reply to: Is my cat’s dry skin and vomiting related to her diet? #3307

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Usually this winter hair loss is a result of environmental dryness. I would be topically moisturizing her skin daily with fatty acids using a spray such as Hy-Lyt moisturizing spray. I would also advise starting her on some systemic skin supplements such as Vitamins A, E, Zn, Biotin and fatty acids. These are all present in the product EFA-Z+ which you add to the food. In addition, because of her age, I would also advise having your vet do a geriatric screen to rule out any other systemic diseases such as hyperthyroidism which could be causing the vomiting. As far as diet is concerned, many cats can tolerate wet food, but not dry. Have you tried stopping the dry food?

    in reply to: Hills Diet c/d for cat with cystitis #3294

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hills prescription diets are indeed only available through vets. If this was Ernie’s first bout with cystitis you can certainly try to manage him on another diet which is less expensive, and easier to obtain. What did the urinalysis and culture show? Without this information, it is impossible to decide what would be an appropriate diet. In general, keeping him on wet food with water mixed into it will help tremendously during the acute episodes. For more general information you should read the cystitis handout in my pet care library.

    in reply to: Weight loss despite eating a lot in an older dog #3293

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    The three things of which I would be suspicious causing weight loss despite a voracious appetite (with normal bloodwork) are a dietary imbalance related to the prolonged use of u/d, cardiac cachexia due to chronic valvular disease, and infiltrative disease causing either poor absorption, or poor utilization of the food. I would consider gradually switching to a higher quality diet, and having x-rays taken to rule out other internal disorders. I will comment further on hypothyroidism if you can tell me the results of the free t4 and TSH tests. You are right though, he is not manifesting any classic signs of hypothyroidism,and the thyroid supplementation maybe unnecessary. Another empiric change you should consider is ading a digestive enzyme to his food to increase nutrient utilization.

    in reply to: Young cat with chronic renal failure (CRF) #3292

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    It is very unusual to diagnose chronic renal failure in a young cat with such high values. Although it is academic at this time, I suspect that your cat suffered a bout of acute renal failure possibly related to toxic ingestion (antifreeze?) or some other factor which I can’t ascertain from your brief history. Alternatively, if your cat is purebred, I would be suspicious of a congenital renal disease.

    Am I reading your message correctly to say that you were giving 300ml three times a day when you brought him home? It is very unusual to get pulmonary edema from fluids administered subcutaneously, but if that amount is correct, it certainly is possible. Had heart disease been ruled out as a cause for the renal failure (secondary to low blood flow to the kidneys)?

    If it has not been done already, I would consider a renal and cardiac ultrasound, and other appropriate diagnostic tests.

    If kidney disease is indeed the only ailment your young cat has, then he would also be an excellent candidate for a kidney transplant).

    in reply to: puppy that bites #3288

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    At this age, realize that teething and playing is a big part of the biting. It is also critical as you mentioned to establish proper pack order now so as to not have a problem as she gets older. Don’t engage her in any tug-of-war or rough and tumble games. You are not one of her playmates. You are a person, and she needs to consider all people as dominant. If she starts biting, gruffly tell her NO (*don’t use her name when telling her no) and redirect the biting to an appropriate object. If she doesn’t respond, then grab the scruff of her neck when you say no, and give her a gentle shake. This should convey your message. There is also a lot of relevant information in my new puppy handouts (especially socializing), so I would read those.

    Have fun with your new pup.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cruciate ligament partial tear #3287

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    To answer your last question first, the improvement you have seen in just two weeks means that you may very well be able to avoid surgery. Cosequin takes at least four weks before full results are seen. I would also be supplementing with Antiox-50 (grape seed extract 50mg) which is a joint specific natural antiinflammatory twice a day. Four 1,000mg fish oil capsules per day are also very useful. Glycoflex is another natural supplement which I would consider adding to the regime. It contains alfalfa and brewers yeast as well as perna extract which helps support the joints. I have also had considerable success using Chinese herbal therapy for joint problems, but this may not be necessary if you use everything else I mentioned, and get her to lose weight.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Patent Ductus Arteriosis (PDA) in a dog #3286

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Thanks for your question. In the case of a patent ductus, I would be working with both an allopathic and holistic veterinarian, unless you know someone in the area who is comfortable treating the “whole”.

    Has Angel had an echocardiogram to determine the degree of dysfunction present? Are you anywhere near a vet school to consult with their cardiology department? Has surgery ever been considered?

    In any case, I would get her onto a natural diet, e.g. either a natural dry food with wholesome foods mixed in, or even better, a home-cooked diet. I wouldn’t use raw to begin with in her case, because she needs to be exposed to a natural diet first, and you need to see what she can tolerate. In general, every change should be made gradually. I would start with a 12-24 hour detoxification (again, only if she can tolerate it). Start feeding her wet rice (use double the amount of water and cook for 2 hours until it falls apart) and mixed with white meat chicken. Other appropriate vegetables and protein sources can be added later.

    She will benefit from moderate exercise and several supplements such as: omega 3 and 6 fatty acids (I use a product called EFA-Z+ supplemented with fish oil capsules), 30mg co-Q 10 twice a day, 50mg grape seed extract twice a day, 500 mg l-carnitine and taurine twice a day, a good antioxidant multivitamin, trace minerals, and other specific measures depending on test results.

    I will be happy to help in any way possible, but don’t forget it is very, very important to have an ongoing, open communication with your local vet in order to manage acute flare ups of her disease.

    Good luck!!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Surgery to remove anal glands? #3285

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    What is the dog’s diet? Does she have formed, or loose stools? It is important to understand that even normal anal glands can get filled up frequently. Under normal circumstances, the gland’s contents are emptied into the stool during a bowel movement. If the stool is loose, or the dog is overweight, or inactive, this normal emptying may not occur. If the glands are emptied artificially frequently, this can actually make the problem worse since her body is not performing its normal functions. When I am presented with a patient who is having the anal glands manually emptied frequently, my best advise is to wait, and let them empty on their own. If they don’t and the dog is very uncomfortable,or if they are starting to abscess, then obviously I empty and treat, but my next step is to add fiber to the dog’s food. This will often help the anals empty on their own. The risk of surgery involves the possibility of fecal incontinence post-operatively, and personally I wouldn’t want to take the risk in such a young dog unless there was no other choice.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New Aggression in GSD #3280

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=nancy ellen]would like to know if there is a homeopathic treatment for this kind of mental quirk.
    [/quote]

    Here we are, years later, and I wonder if any behavior issues have persisted with your dog. My initial thought was that this was a normal situational behavior, but now we can evaluate the behavior much more effectively.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Pneumonia #3268

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Firstly, thanks for the spam report.

    Second, you can try various immune boosters and colostrum-like products (I use IgG 2000 from Xymogen) tho of course they are not the same as antibiotics. Best thi ng is to supervise closely those young pups while transitioning the diet.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Lyme treatment with no symptoms? #3248

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hwatsonsalo]do you treat Lyme with Ledum in dogs that are not showing signs? Or do you wait to see symptoms, then treat with Ledum? [/quote]

    Hi Heather-

    Two issues. First, a positive Lyme test is just that and only that. It just means that your dog may have been exposed to the Borrelia organism that causes Lyme. Positivity does not equal dis-ease. A strong vital force resulting in an optimized immune system should be able to do its job (help maintain balance).

    Second. Ledum (or any homeopathic remedy) does not treat Lyme (or any disease). Homeopathic remedies treat the body’s response to some stress, e.g exposure to Lyme. Personally, although I’ve succesfully treated dozens of dogs with Lyme symptoms homeopathically, I’ve never used Ledum.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Constant nasal infection, huge lymph nodes #3247

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=bordercolliefan86]any know about this?[/quote]

    The “wound” was probably just a red herring which triggered a flare-up of an underlying energetic imbalance.

    After seeing what your vet has to say I would [b]strongly[/b] urge that you add a veterinary homeopath to your medical team.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: happy cat dropping weight #3246

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=mom2sande]
    Any ideas and help would be appreciated.
    Thanks.[/quote]

    Yours are good. Hyperthyroidism is most likely. Have a full panel and urinalysis run however. Make sure that it includes a t4 and free t4.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Bowel movement while sleeping #3245

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=06superduty]he would wake up and move there would be a few turds left behind [/quote]

    Since he is well overall, this sounds like a mild neurological issue to me. Decreased sensation in the colon and perineum.

    Try adding 1/4 tsp. Metamucil to each meal. If problems persist then a vet exam is definitely in order.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Chronic cough/bronchitis (long) #3238

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=oscarsgal57] I know that homeopathy is probably one of the safest adjuncts to his allopathic care [/quote]

    Hi Marsha-

    Actually, homeopathy is not just an adjunct but is a much more effective method of primary care than allopathy, e.g. most homeopaths had very, very low mortality pre-antibiotics in cases with high mortality like flu, cholera, typhoid, pertussis, plague, etc.

    The problem in this case is the amount of palliation and suppression that Reno has had (is having). Homeopathy can definitely still help improve his length and quality of life, but it’s not going to be an easy road for [b]you[/b] to travel.

    To allow his body to heal at the deepest (energetic) level will require weaning of some meds, tolerating some symptoms (that were “controlled” by the drugs), close monitoring, and frequent follow up. Quite a bit different than most allopathic care.

    If you’re up for it, please go to the link which I sent you read the info, and submit the questionnaire. Call after you do so, and I will call you back.

    Thanks.

    Have a wonderful weekend.

    I sure hope Reno is OK.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Please Clarify Thoughts About Spaying/Neutering #3232

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sophiesmom]On balance, what do you recommend– waiting till after the first heat or getting it done before if possible? I know there are pros and cons to both.[/quote]

    Thanks for your careful reading of this thread. You’re right. Research has shown over the past few years that early spay/neuter is not without problems (primarily increased risk of certain cancers).

    Currently I evaluate every situation individually taking into account all of the info and circumstances. From what little I know about your situation, I think spaying at any time will be OK.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Desperate! Lyme? Seizures? #3231

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hvadney] I really need to help him.

    [/quote]

    First, you need to find out why he is having seizures. I’d strongly advise a visit with a neurologist or internist to help get a diagnosis.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cushings #3220

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=copperpenny] I want to give him any supplements that might help him. Currently he is on:
    Rimidyl
    joint enhancer
    vitamins
    Blue Buffalo dog food
    anti-biotics (as a preventive)
    yogurt (small amt. to counter the anti-biotics)
    y[/quote]

    Hard to individualize for your dog without knowing much more (history, blood work, clinical symptoms, etc.). In general, the best you can do for him is to get him onto a fresh (or at least fresher) food diet. You can add omega-3s, other antioxidants and/or a good multi-vitamin, liver support, etc., etc.

    You might want to add a holistic/homeopathic vet to your healthcare team in order to achieve the best quality of life for your dog.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: How long for responses #3214

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=keiko] how long it takes to get a response to posting a question[/quote]

    It really varies. Being a free service in addition to my regular ,busy, practice, I may log on daily or not for a few weeks.

    Regarding anal sac problems, sometimes oils in the diet will help palliate when fiber does not (have you tried canned pumpkin?).

    The very best way to deal with these (and most) issues is to eliminate the underlying energetic disease which causes them with homeopathy.

    in reply to: hemolytic anemia #3210

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=judik]Any suggestions to help support her naturally? [/quote]

    Sorry for the slow reply.

    This is a complex disease with many individual factors to consider. Optimal diet, avoiding *any* drugs or environmental toxins, proper supplementation (there are many useful supplements which would be best prescribed by a holistic vet) will help. Constitutional homeopathic prescribing however is the best way, by far, to facilitate weaning of the pred. Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org[/url] for a referral.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Is Merrick canned…. #3209

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Simba]Hi,
    Is Merrick canned a good choice for a cat that has struvite crystals tendency?[/quote]

    This is OK to use for now. It is best however to continue trying to vary the diet. Also try introducing some fresh (not canned) foods like chicken, turkey, beef, etc. Read my diet articles and links for much more info.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Questions re: Nosodes used as Preventative #3189

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tworeds]Dear Dr. Feinman,

    1) Can a monthly Lyme Nosode cause a positive SNAP test?

    2) Do you recommend use of SNAP tests or other Lyme test?

    3) What is your opinion of an initial IDEXX C6 test level of 129?

    4) Should I get a C6 test done OR do your recommend perhaps Cornell U. lab receiving blood sample to test?[/quote]

    1-No.

    2-Sometimes, tho not usually (as they are [i]usually[/i] very misleading)

    3-They call it positive and requires treatment. I say that it just shows exposure and antibody development and is no indication of disease.

    4-Cornell testing is probably the most accurate test of it’s kind FWIW.

    Also, I do not use heartworm or Lyme (or other nosodes) and rather rely on proper constitutional care for prevention of all dis-eases.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-There is a huge amount of Lyme info on this site if you look around and/or search/Google.

    in reply to: dizzy puppy help! #3188

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=princess_deidre]Today and yesterday at around 5pm she got extremely dizzy. [/quote]

    I agree that low blood sugar, especially if 5 pm is before dinner, is a possibility. There are however many others such as liver diseases like shunts which are common in this breed (especially pups).

    A proper ([b]low[/b] simple sugar and minimally processed) diet will help a lot. Tho Karo syrup (or similar) is OK during very acute episodes, it should not be used routinely as it can aggravate the condition in the long run.

    I’m sure that by now you have had a visit to your vet and have more info that you can share with us. I also urge you to seek nutritional and homeopathic counseling either with your local (or another properly trained) vet.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Herniated disc in dog- has anyone gone through this? #3187

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=marciek]
    Can this heal on it’s own possibly? Are there any other things I can be doing to help him recover….hot packs or cold packs. Nutrition wise, is there something I can give him?
    [/quote]

    Yes, the body can definitely adapt to the possible cervical disc protrusion. Anti-inflammatories (like pred) will decrease the swelling and thereby help the body to adapt.

    For long term maintenance I prefer natural meds like Antiox and Resveratrol, etc. A fresh food diet, minimizing vaccination and homeopathic care will help prevent flare-ups of this condition as well as development of others in the future.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shedding a virus #3186

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Annette].he is doing so well.
    Your site and help is wonderful. Many thanks!

    Annette[/quote]

    Excellent!!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Rabies Vaccination Question Please #3176

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=WESTIELOVER]what will I do if the test does not come back as I hope it will? I have always been told that only a “Healthy” animal should be vaccinated. [/quote]

    If she has had prior rabies inoculations, and if her immune system is functioning anywhere near “normal” then I would be willing to bet that the titer will be protective. In the very unlikely event that it is not, then Chloe’s medical conditions may preclude any other vaccinations. Ever.

    Talk to your vet about getting a waiver. Kris Christine in Maine [url]http://www.rabieschallengefund.org/researchers%20behind%20the%20challenge.html[/url] can help you further if necessary.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Leptospirosis #3175

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=evaluv]
    Are the risks worth getting the vaccine, [/quote]

    Not in my opinion. The best defense against any infectious disease is a strong immune system. All vaccines are shown to harm the immune system and can induce immune-mediated diseases. The only cases of Lepto which I have seen (also in CT) are referred to me even though (because?) they had been vaccinated.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: cats with crysals #3174

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=fostercrystal]dear: dr jeff i was woundering if a few crysals in my male cats urine can cause him to pull out his hair in his backleggs and tail and his back. [/quote]

    Probably not but the underlying energetic imbalance that is causing the crystal formation can definitely also cause him to be pulling out hair. Constitutional homeopathic treatment will help.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: need dog to gain weight #3173

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=dana]So are there anything out there I can give him to make him healthy & gain some weight?? Maybe a food that is great for dogs to gain weight, a vitamin?? Thanks in advance.[/quote]

    Use as much fresh foods as possible. In addition, Wysong’s Optimal Performance and Archetype Burgers [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=54[/url] and Ziwi Peak [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=93[/url] are high in calories and vitamins and are great for weight gain.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Water Allergy? #3172

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Dori1019]
    Is it possible she is allergic to the water,
    Cari[/quote]

    It is possible, but unlikely. There certainly may be something in the other house to which she is reacting (different treats, household cleaners, wool rugs, etc.). My Calm N Soothe spray [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=96&osCsid=2fb0f0ef8a8479e9c6805d1988608bca[/url] and fatty acid supplementation can help. Ideally of course you would homeopathically treat the immune hypersensitivity that is causing the hives (no matter what the trigger).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Drippy Mouth?????? #3168

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Brent]IHave any of you heard of anything like this and IS THERE A FIX???
    d[/quote]

    Yes (I have seen this symptom). However, unless there is a pathologic problem, e.g. dental disease, this is not a symptom that needs “fixing”. It is much, much more important to look at the totality of symptoms to see if the drooling after exposure to cold is significant in his overall picture.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: My 1 1/2 year old Boston Terrier has severe allergies … #3144

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=MyPuppyHarley]
    With all of this said, we’re out of ideas on how to control the allergies. Does anyone know of anything other than Atopica ![/quote]

    Atopica is cyclosporine, which is a chemotherapy drug first used in transplant patients to prevent rejection (by reducing the immune response). It is just another in a long line of drugs designed to cover up (not eliminate) the allergy symptoms. Similar action to steroids.

    My advice is to work at eliminating the underlying imbalance which is resulting in the allergy symptoms. This can be done by working with an experienced homeopathic vet. S/he will start a species appropriate (fresh food, meat-based) diet and [b]appropriate[/b] homeopathic remedies. This will help your dog’s internal balance and thereby reduce or eliminate the allergy symptoms without causing other problems.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Neutering – YES or NO?? Would appreciate an answer ASAP #3118

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This is the summary of an important article for anyone who wants to make an informed decision about neutering:

    SUMMARY
    An objective reading of the veterinary medical literature reveals a complex situation with respect to the longterm
    health risks and benefits associated with spay/neuter in dogs. The evidence shows that spay/neuter
    Page 2 of 12
    correlates with both positive AND adverse health effects in dogs. It also suggests how much we really do
    not yet understand about this subject.
    On balance, it appears that no compelling case can be made for neutering most male dogs, especially
    immature male dogs, in order to prevent future health problems. The number of health problems associated
    with neutering may exceed the associated health benefits in most cases.
    On the positive side, neutering male dogs
    • eliminates the small risk (probably <1%) of dying from testicular cancer
    • reduces the risk of non-cancerous prostate disorders
    • reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
    • may possibly reduce the risk of diabetes (data inconclusive)
    On the negative side, neutering male dogs
    • if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a
    common cancer in medium/large and larger breeds with a poor prognosis.
    • increases the risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 1.6
    • triples the risk of hypothyroidism
    • increases the risk of progressive geriatric cognitive impairment
    • triples the risk of obesity, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
    • quadruples the small risk (<0.6%) of prostate cancer
    • doubles the small risk (5; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
    • triples the risk of hypothyroidism
    • increases the risk of obesity by a factor of 1.6-2, a common health problem in dogs with many
    associated health problems
    • causes urinary “spay incontinence” in 4-20% of female dogs
    • increases the risk of persistent or recurring urinary tract infections by a factor of 3-4
    • increases the risk of recessed vulva, vaginal dermatitis, and vaginitis, especially for female dogs
    spayed before puberty
    • doubles the small risk (<1%) of urinary tract tumors
    • increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
    • increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations
    One thing is clear – much of the spay/neuter information that is available to the public is unbalanced and
    contains claims that are exaggerated or unsupported by evidence. Rather than helping to educate pet
    Page 3 of 12
    owners, much of it has contributed to common misunderstandings about the health risks and benefits
    associated of spay/neuter in dogs.
    The traditional spay/neuter age of six months as well as the modern practice of pediatric spay/neuter appear
    to predispose dogs to health risks that could otherwise be avoided by waiting until the dog is physically
    mature, or perhaps in the case of many male dogs, foregoing it altogether unless medically necessary.
    The balance of long-term health risks and benefits of spay/neuter will vary from one dog to the next. Breed,
    age, and gender are variables that must be taken into consideration in conjunction with non-medical factors
    for each individual dog. Across-the-board recommendations for all pet dogs do not appear to be
    supportable from findings in the veterinary medical literature.
    FINDINGS FROM STUDIES
    This section summarizes the diseases or conditions that have been studied with respect to spay/neuter in
    dogs.
    Complications from Spay/Neuter Surgery
    All surgery incurs some risk of complications, including adverse reactions to anesthesia, hemorrhage,
    inflammation, infection, etc. Complications include only immediate and near term impacts that are clearly
    linked to the surgery, not to longer term impacts that can only be assessed by research studies.
    At one veterinary teaching hospital where complications were tracked, the rates of intraoperative,
    postoperative and total complications were 6.3%, 14.1% and 20.6%, respectively as a result of spaying
    female dogs1. Other studies found a rate of total complications from spaying of 17.7%2 and 23%3. A study
    of Canadian veterinary private practitioners found complication rates of 22% and 19% for spaying female
    dogs and neutering male dogs, respectively4.
    Serious complications such as infections, abscesses, rupture of the surgical wound, and chewed out sutures
    were reported at a 1- 4% frequency, with spay and castration surgeries accounting for 90% and 10% of
    these complications, respectively.4
    The death rate due to complications from spay/neuter is low, at around 0.1%2.
    Prostate Cancer
    Much of the spay/neuter information available to the public asserts that neutering will reduce or eliminate the
    risk that male dogs develop prostate cancer. This would not be an unreasonable assumption, given that
    prostate cancer in humans is linked to testosterone. But the evidence in dogs does not support this claim.
    In fact, the strongest evidence suggests just the opposite.
    There have been several conflicting epidemiological studies over the years that found either an increased
    risk or a decreased risk of prostate cancer in neutered dogs. These studies did not utilize control
    populations, rendering these results at best difficult to interpret. This may partially explain the conflicting
    results.
    More recently, two retrospective studies were conducted that did utilize control populations. One of these
    studies involved a dog population in Europe5 and the other involved a dog population in America6. Both
    studies found that neutered male dogs have a four times higher risk of prostate cancer than intact dogs.
    Based on their results, the researchers suggest a cause-and-effect relationship: “this suggests that
    castration does not initiate the development of prostatic carcinoma in the dog, but does favor tumor
    progression”5 and also “Our study found that most canine prostate cancers are of ductal/urothelial
    origin….The relatively low incidence of prostate cancer in intact dogs may suggest that testicular hormones
    Page 4 of 12
    are in fact protective against ductal/urothelial prostatic carcinoma, or may have indirect effects on cancer
    development by changing the environment in the prostate.”6
    This needs to be put in perspective. Unlike the situation in humans, prostate cancer is uncommon in dogs.
    Given an incidence of prostate cancer in dogs of less than 0.6% from necropsy studies7, it is difficult to see
    that the risk of prostate cancer should factor heavily into most neutering decisions. There is evidence for an
    increased risk of prostate cancer in at least one breed (Bouviers)5, though very little data so far to guide us
    in regards to other breeds.
    Testicular Cancer
    Since the testicles are removed with neutering, castration removes any risk of testicular cancer (assuming
    the castration is done before cancer develops). This needs to be compared to the risk of testicular cancer in
    intact dogs.
    Testicular tumors are not uncommon in older intact dogs, with a reported incidence of 7%8. However, the
    prognosis for treating testicular tumors is very good owing to a low rate of metastasis9, so testicular cancer
    is an uncommon cause of death in intact dogs. For example, in a Purdue University breed health survey of
    Golden Retrievers10, deaths due to testicular cancer were sufficiently infrequent that they did not appear on
    list of significant causes of "Years of Potential Life Lost for Veterinary Confirmed Cause of Death” even
    though 40% of GR males were intact. Furthermore, the GRs who were treated for testicular tumors had a
    90.9% cure rate. This agrees well with other work that

    in reply to: Swollen Nipples #3117

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=jpruitt]Other than pregnancy, what can cause a canine to lactate?[/quote]

    Many hormonal and emotionally-related perturbations. Basically anything that causes the brain to release the hormones involved in lactation. Of course, a visit to your vet will be necessary to rule out any structural (or other) problems.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Osteocarcinoma #3116

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Jay48390]Any tips, suggestions, recommendations would be appreciated.[/quote]

    There are LOTS of changes that you can make for both dogs. Start by readin some of my holistic care and diet information. Dr. Hamilton’s book is another essential tool. You should then consult a holistic vet (preferably one with classical homeopathic training) to become part of your health care team.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help Me Please! #3115

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=DB1027]I have no idea how to help my dog. She is clearly uncomfortable and seems so sad. PLEASE, someone help me.[/quote]

    This sounds like a functional (vs. structural) problem which should be addressed homeopathically. Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] for a referral.

    Dr. jeff

    in reply to: Bloody scab around penis #3114

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=mgill]I don’t want to panic [/quote]

    Hard to say exactly what this is. Perhaps you should schedule the neutering at your vet and have him look at it at that time.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Large lump on kitty’s back #3113

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=cat lover] I am wondering if aspirating it would cause any ill effects such as if it is cancer will it get “angry”? ![/quote]

    Excellent point. Aspirating can activate a tumor and I don’t recommend it (especially since it won’t change what you do). This site is typical for VAS (vaccine-associated sarcomas) and if that is indeed what this is, you definitely don’t want to mess around with it.

    Keep up the excellent diet, and appropriate holistic supplements (please don’t give homeopathic remedies on your own). You might also find these general cancer supplements useful: [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=4&products_id=97[/url] and [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=4&products_id=43[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: purina veterinary diets #3112

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hallie]can I order purina dm diabetes management feline formula (dry food) online or do I have to purchase from a vet?[/quote]

    As far as I know, this is only available with a vet prescription.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: cat food dry vs wet #3111

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hallie]I need to know if there is any dry food good for a cat with diabetes?[/quote]

    No. There are “prescription” and lower carbohydrate dry foods but IMHO none are appropriate for diabetic cats.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Elderly Cat Losing Weight #3110

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=kkeizer] I want to make sure I have done everything that I could for her that is non-invasive .[/quote]

    Then you definitely should pursue holistic and homeopathic treatment. Go to the AVH and AHVMA sites for referrals (theavh.org and ahvma.org).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: HELP: Skin Issue with 1 year old Jack Russel #3109

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Antz_Marchin]do the current spots need to be treated somehow?[/quote]

    In general, just treating local lesions is not a good idea (this can be highly suppressive and worsen the underlying condition). You are correct to think that this might be diet and or “allergy” related.

    Talk to your vet about fresh food feeding and proper holistic care to insure your pup a long and happy life.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: corneal ulcer #3108

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=shjemoma]What causes this and what is the outcome[/quote]

    Although indolent (chronic, unhealing) corneal ulcers are not common in this breed, this may be what you are dealing with. The specialist will likely debride (remove tissue) from the cornea for culture and to promote healing.

    Topical medications should then resolve the problem. If however there is an underlying issue, and the cornea remains unhealed, you should consult a vet homeopath to promote natural healing.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury #3107

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Beagle Mom]we are looking for options at this point. [/quote]

    Many of these “injuries” will heal just fine with proper supportive care (good diet, weight loss if needed, glucosamine sulfate, antioxidants, omega-3s, etc.). Most of the supplements that I use for joint problems are at [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=3[/url]

    A consult with a veterinary orthopod is still a good idea (just for informational purposes). If you are trying to avoid any surgery then you should consult a trained holistic (preferably homeopathic vet) for further treatment.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: my dog has a swollen anel sack what can I do ? #3106

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hallie]any clues as to what I can do for him.[/quote]

    Unfortunately I don’t have nearly enough information about your dog to help specifically. In general, anal sac issues can be helped tremendously with proper diet, extra fiber, weight loss if needed and lots of exercise.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Paw gnawing #3105

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sneakers14] if there is anything that I could do to calm his nerves and OCD-like behavior,[/quote]

    I agree that these physical symptoms (the chewing) may be a manifestation of a deep-rooted emotional imbalance (like OCD in people). Alternatively there may actually be a physical sensation (which of course he can’t verbally tell you about) causing the chewing. You can palliate the symptom with calming and soothing sprays or topicals like [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=96&osCsid=86d0fe5acdd8ad3e430c958d4cf2db25[/url] .

    Personally I would also strongly advise seeking homeopathic treatment to get to the root of the problem.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: What can I do to help my dog? #3104

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=gridlors] I think it is allergies but I want to make sure before I give him something for it.[/quote]

    Yes, I agree that “allergies” are the most likely reason for the itch (though of course there are other possibilities such as other skin parasites aside from fleas).

    My advice is to start working with a holistic vet to get him on a species-appropriate diet, possibly using fatty acids and other supplements if needed. In addition, proper homeopathic care can help eliminate any immune imbalance (which is what causes the allergic manifestations in the first place).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Severe discoid lupus in paws #3103

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ckoczat] They are contemplating giving up and putting her down as they realize her quality of life is suffering….there has got to be a way to treat somethign like this. Any help would be greatly appreciated![/quote]

    There is absolutely no need for your friends to give up. Many veterinary homeopaths have success in treating this disease without drugs (by stimulating the natural healing ability of the dog).

    If they are interested in pursuing homeopathic treatment (and I certainly hope that they are), they can find a referral at [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Loss of Appetite due to Illness #3101

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Schwe]
    Is there any supplement or holistic method to stimulate appetite and/or help her?
    .[/quote]

    Take a look at [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=28[/url] and [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=5&products_id=83[/url]

    in reply to: cushings..help please #3069

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=dorothy] i am scared to death by all of this.[/quote]

    No need to be scared. A “Cushing’s” diagnosis may not be a big deal. I would consult a trained veterinary homeopath for proper treatment (if the Cushex drops are a combination homeopathic remedy then I would recommend that you stop using them).

    You should educate yourself about the dis-ease (lots of good web resources including this reliable article though I disagree with their treatment options: [url]http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/cliented/cushings.asp[/url] ) and then learn more about the homeopathic healing process at [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/WhatIsHomeopathy.html[/url]

    in reply to: Low Platelet Count #3068

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tataylor]should I get a second opinion [/quote]

    Such a low platelet count is potentially life-threatening, even without current symptoms.

    Your best recourse is to consult a specialist (internist or hematologist) for a [i]diagnosis[/i]. At the same time set up an appointment with a homeopath for [b]treatment[/b].

    in reply to: Severe Allergies? #3067

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Frankie] I really would like some advice on what I can do to for him.

    [/quote]

    Start treatment with a homeopath sooner than later.

    in reply to: Yellow Tinged Eye Discharge #3066

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Frankie] Is there anything I can do for him naturally? We have no homeopathic vets in our area, [/quote]

    Homeopathic treatment can be [b]very[/b] effective even if the vet homeopath doesn’t get to physically see the patient (though digital photos and videos can be very useful).

    All you need is a local vet who is willing to become a member of your health care team. S/he can act as the local eyes for your remote homeopath (who you can work with by phone and e-mail). They can do exams, run diagnostic tests when indicated etc. Just no suppressive treatments please.

    in reply to: Potential Herniated Disc #3058

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=frogbaby91]My baby didn’t make it. The Vet was unsure of what happened [/quote]

    I’m so sorry for your loss of Prissy.

    Feel free to contact me through this board if I can help in any way (this article might help a little [url]https://www.homevet.com/bonding/loss.html[/url] ).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Having trouble with homeopathy #3057

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Barghest]
    lm really worried and dont know what to do, is there any such thing as an antidote remedy to stop the effects of those remedies given. [/quote]

    You should contact Sue Armstrong for further homeopathic care. You’re right that vets in the UK practice differently than those in the US, but I know Sue and she is a wonderful vet and homeopath (both human and animal). You can reach her through [url]http://www.balancedbeing.com/[/url].

    In [i]general[/i], in a young animal with good vitality (minimal vaccinations, good diet, no prior symptom suppression) any dis-similar aggravations from a single dose of remedy will abate on their own. It may be however that this was actually a previously hidden symptom of the chronic imbalance which has become active due to the energetic action of the remedy. If so, this symptom may remain until the underlying problem is addressed (with other dynamic remedies).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Having trouble with homeopathy #3052

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Barghest]
    Can you give me any advice, does this type of prescribing sound as dangerous as l feel[/quote]

    Wow! I’m sorry to hear about your experience with “homeopathy” in the UK. I don’t know what more to say and can’t really comment on treatment by a colleague (especially when I have not reviewed the records).

    I [b]strongly[/b] advise contacting a true Hahnemannian homeopath. You will probably need to stop all remedies for a while to let the true dis-ease picture to emerge. Fortunately he is a young dog with superficial symptom manifestations so you’ve got the luxury of time.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Potential Herniated Disc #3051

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=frogbaby91]What are the odds of recovery?[/quote]

    Recovery from a true acutely herniated disc is quite good. That’s not what this sounds like however. I would advise immediate consultation with a neurology *specialist*.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: kidney liver problem #3042

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Daika]
    Can anyone advice me on how to help this dog? [/quote]

    First let me say that this is potentially a very serious problem. It needs to be addressed by an experienced, well-trained (in both diagnostic medicine as well as veterinary homeopathy) homeopath.

    This dog may need to see an internist as well as to work with a veterinary homeopath. Has Leptospirosis been ruled out? This should be done as this is a zoonotic disease (you can catch it from animals).

    The remedies you mentioned all have an affinity for the liver but should not be selected based on common symptoms of the disease or blood tests. This is one reason why a diagnosis is important.

    In addition, as you imply, this may be a manifestation of vaccinosis (dis-ease arising secondary to chronic ill effects of vaccines). All the more reason to seek professional help.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Yeast Infection Update #3041

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Jeanne] using yogurt. It’s good for curing the yeast infections, not just suppressing the symptom’s. [/quote]

    Yes. Yogurt works well to calm the ears and can help palliate the symptoms of yeast “infections”. Most importantly, keep working with your homeopath to eliminate the underlying energetic imbalance which allowed the yeast to become a problem in the first place. Remember, many (most) dogs have yeast and bacteria in their ears yet do not have ear problems.

    The [b]”terrain”[/b] is everything (maintaining optimum health). The infectious agent is of secondary importance (and only affects those that are already dis-eased).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: old cat/new puppy- serious problems. please help!! #3035

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Labman] how can i make her feel comfortable here? please help.[/quote]

    Bring her in and keep her in for a day or two. Lavish plenty of attention on her. Lots of cuddling, hand-feeding special treats, playing games, etc. Keep her away from the pup during this time. Don’t let her see you interact with him at all if possible.

    Give her 2 drops of Rescue Remedy as needed based on any anxiety that she is showing when you have her inside, e.g. if she starts warily looking around for the puppy. Then you can let her out but be sure to get her in every day. Repeat the exercise. Slowly you can introduce her to the pup.

    This process will take time so please be patient.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Natural Supplement Opinion #3030

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Donna]I. The product is called Longlife and is promoted by a Dr. Tobin in Connecticut. Are you familiar with this product[/quote]

    Most importantly, supplements (of ANY kind) are NOT homeopathy. Secondly, I am not familiar with this supplement though I assume it is one of the many chondroitin supplements on the market. IMHO I would recommend homeopathic treatment.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: new cat – diarrhoea #3029

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE=daisyloverI plan to give her herbal and homeopathic preventatives for these sort of things.
    We don’t need dramas like this :)[/QUOTE]

    Excellent! Prevention is definitely the way to go.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Post-neuter remedies #3028

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tricias_petz]Hi, I had my prev. feral cat neutered today, and I’m wondering what I can give him to help him recover. [/quote]

    If he is doing fine without a remedy then he should not need anything aside from his natural healing ability.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: vaccination questions #3027

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=browneuan025837]My friend If you like your vet, no reason to change. Just update vaccines. Rabies is required and distemper is highly recommended. Bordetella is for kennel cough and should be given to any dog who is ever around other dogs.[/quote]

    I agree with sticking with the vet who you like (assuming that s/he supports your holistic homeopathic management decisions).

    I strongly disagree that is OK to routinely get these vaccinations (except rabies as required by law though that requirement may soon change as well). I respectfully suggest that you read the vaccine section of this website and other recent scientific findings to understand why.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: vaccination questions #2998

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE=vickiee]is it too late to turn her around with homeopathic care,/QUOTE]

    Definitely not!! Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] for a referral.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Feeding Amounts? #2997

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Buffy111_99]Can you help?[/quote]

    There are many books and resources available for detailed diet advice. The Wysong and Bravo introductory booklets are very nice as is the DVD on transitioning to a fresh food diet:[url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=60[/url]

    For individualized advice you need to work with a holistic vet or other dietary consultant (like [url]http://www.naturalpetoptions.com/pages/consult.php[/url])

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat drinking enough? #2996

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Lynn M]Our female cat (aged 6) does not seem to drink much! [/quote]

    Healthy cats don’t need to drink much (if at all). They get their water from the food.

    in reply to: Chesapeake really sick…HELP!! #2995

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=vlare] bleeding from his penis, he was deathly ill, [/quote]

    Hi Vikki-

    As per your other post, it looks like you have been giving aspirin for hip discomfort. If you have been giving it chronically then I would consider some sort of drug reaction (aspirin can predispose both to clotting and kidney problems).

    It’s possible that this is just a simple urinary infection (cystitis) but then I would not expect your dog to have been so sick. I’d also be suspicious of a prostatitis (which could also be causing hind quarter and walking problems).

    Regardless, you need to bring him to the vet ASAP for a thorough exam. I’d also recommend bringing a morning urine sample for analysis.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: head injury with seizures, urgent #2994

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=phtm35] rescue puppy was bitten by one of my older dogs, on the head. , when she started have seizures. Is there anything I can do for her at home, [/quote]

    What was her immediate reaction to the bite (severe crying with pain, shock, no reaction at all, etc.)? What are the other symptoms since the bite? Is the pup now normal in every way except when she seizes? What about preferring to lie in one place vs. moving from spot to spot? Eating, drinking, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, sneezing? Preferring to be with you or by herself? How long are the seizures, when do they occur and what are they like?

    The reason I ask all of these questions is because you can often use homeopathic remedies quite successfully in a situation like this (Arnica, Hypericum, Aconite, etc.) by individualizing the remedy to the body’s response to the trauma. Results depend of course on the degree of tissue damage.

    Regardless, a vet visit just for examination would be a great idea in lieu of or in addition to homeopathic treatment. Pups have an amazing healing capacity…

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: yellow discharge from penis of dog #2992

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [QUOTE=campwrinklessharpei]His penis has a yellow discharge on it./QUOTE]

    Yellow-green or creamy discharge coming from the end of the [u]prepuce[/u] can be normal. The prepuce (the skin surrounding the penis) is lined with glands and can secrete this type of material. If he is truly discharging from the penis, e.g. you see discharge when he urinates or coming from the penis when it is out of its’ sheath, then you need to see your vet to rule out other problems.

    Homeopathically, an increased preputial discharge is potentially a significant symptom of dynamic imbalance which should be addressed by a veterinary homeopath.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: severe leg spasms #2991

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=aveenstra]he has severe leg spasms and his whole body moves, he sounds like he’ll tear down the house. [/quote]

    Sounds like a seizure which at this age can have many possible causes. You need to see your vet for an exam and workup.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: How to discuss posology with my DVM homeopath #2980

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ronross]give me some hints as to how to communicate with my vet [/quote]

    Excellent question. I will need to ponder it further. In the meantime, please contact me privately.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shedding a virus #2972

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Annette] Whitey has about 6 of those horns on his neck, he is eating ONLY his dry food, no canned (last 2 days). [/quote]

    His prognosis depends on what the “horns” are. If you can post a link to a photo, I will take a look.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New Puppy and resident dog #2971

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=evelement] I have no clue if they are fighting or playing. And either way – they have to stop. One of them is going to get hurt.
    [/quote]

    They are playing (albeit too aggressively for your little dog). Ask your boyfriend to exercise and tire out the puppy as much as possible before the two dogs play too much. And by all means, keep a close eye on their play to make sure that your Chihuahua doesn’t get injured (though it sounds like she can take care of herself).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shelter Italian Greyhound #2970

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=WyleBoy]Will this ever stop or will I need to see a trainer?[/quote]

    First, try using Zero Odor eliminator on the areas which he has marked previously (this will reduce the likelihood of using thos spots again due to their odor). Then contine your daily training at home. If problems persist then you need to start working with a dog trainer to help with housebreaking (read my puppy rearing articles and the article on How Dogs Think at [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/pet_new.html[/url] for much more info).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Drooling – Not Normal #2961

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=GeezerB]

    What do you think?[/quote]

    My off the cuff opinion is that the excessive salivation is either a result of nausea (often associated with a motility disorder) or “bromalism” (reaction to the KBr which you use tp prevent seizures).

    I would work with diet (especially with the food allergy history) and homeopathy to appropriately resolve (not palliate) this symptom.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Recurrent abscess/erythema in neck-help #2960

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=C. Clifford]
    The vet says the test results are normal…[/quote]

    Great (but don’t forget that functional symptoms begin before biochemical abnormalities become evident).!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shedding a virus #2959

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Annette].with his active leukemia state, IS there a chance for remission of the virus? [/quote]

    The answer depends on what you mean by “active”. If he already has severe anemia or advanced lymphosarcoma (cancer) associated with the virus the prognosis is generally not good (no matter what you do).

    That being said, I don’t however typically associate the word remission with feline leukemia because [i]in my opinion[/i], it is not typically a virulent or rapidly progressing disease like “cancer”.

    As I have mentioned elsewhere (see [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/flnvrs.html[/url] ), excellent nutrition, appropriate supplementation and homeopathy can often help cats that are FeLV positive live long and happy lives.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: death from pet foods #2958

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Here’s the latest resource from the ASPCA:

    [url]http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=recall_faq#1[/url]

    in reply to: Shedding a virus #2944

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Annette] If there is anything else you feel might help, I would appreciate your thoughts.[/quote]

    Add fresh food (like chicken, beef, fish, etc.) to the canned Pet Promise (and use other types of canned foods as well like Precise, Wysong meats/Archetype, ZiwiPeak, etc.).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Heart murmur #2941

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Kammieabc]dog has heart disease, she would have heart murmur?

    [/quote]

    Only in certain types of heart disease (usually when the heart valves are involved). Electrical problems within the heart, e.g. causing heart irregularities, are also fairly common and may not cause a murmur.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shedding a virus #2940

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Annette]What exactly does this mean?

    How can one tell if the virus is indeed active or in remission.

    Is there any other adivse for how to bring this into remission?

    I am still so confused as to how she contracted the virus in the first place since she was an indoor only cat and not exposed to other animals.
    [/quote]

    I’m so sorry for the loss of your mama cat.

    1-It means that the virus may be present in saliva, urine, stool, etc. and therefore other animals could be at risk.

    2-Usually based on active symptoms of disease, e,g, cancer, anemias, high white count, liver, kidney, or other organ problems, fluid in the chest or belly, etc.

    3-The best way to treat a leukemia positive cat is to strengthen the immune system. This is done by optimal diet (fresh/real food and meat-based), good hygiene with plenty of exercise and proper weight, and constitutional homeopathic prescribing over the life of your cat. I would advise contacting an experienced vet homeopath for proper treatment.

    4-Probably at birth.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Which supplement? #2939

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sbishop]My dog has allergies with ear infection problems and many skin problems.[/quote]

    Most chronic skin problems can be helped through appropriate (fresh food, gluten, soy and corn free) diet and supplementation (any of these supplements may be indicated depending on the symptoms [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=2&osCsid=7267f7f96eec374f4d4591dc59ce8348[/url] ).

    IMHO the [b]best[/b] way to improve allergic symptoms (frequently resulting from immune over reaction) is by combining diet and supplementation with constitutional homeopathy. Read [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/WhatIsHomeopathy.html[/url] for more info.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Recurrent abscess/erythema in neck-help #2938

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=C. Clifford]he is back to peeing constantly.

    Is there a homeopathic way to cure this? I have no idea where this came from or why it reappeared.
    [/quote]

    Sounds like a urinary tract inflammation. Aside from the frequency, is there any urgency, pain on urination or straining to urinate? Was his urine ever analyzed for white cells, bacteria, etc.?

    The homeopathic way to address these symptoms is to figure out what is going on internally (energetically) *[i]overall[/i]* (not just whether the urine tests positive for “infection”). There are many homeopathic remedies that can resolve this problem once and for all as well as prevent future recurrence. These need to be strictly individualized (usually by a vet homeopath) using the totality of the case.

    In general, for holistic (not homeopathic) support you need to increase fluids (including discontinuing any dry food), add vitamiin C and cranberry extract as well as some general immune support, e.g. Super Immunotone.

    Antibiotics and/or steroids might help the immediate symptoms, but will not address the underlying dynamic disease.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cairn Terrier #2931

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Springfield-R] At all times, she is right in line with me.

    she has NEVER gone to the bathroom outside![email][email protected][/email][/quote]

    It sounds like she is not associating going outside with eliminating. Take her out frequently, but only for to urinate or defecate. Then go back inside. Take her out separately if you are going to walk or play together. Be sure to get her out immediately upon awakening, after eating, drinking, getting excited (for whatever reason), etc. Read the puppy house training handouts at [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/pet_new.html[/url] for much more info.

    Dr Jeff

    in reply to: Vitamin/Mineral Supplement needed #2929

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sparkling sparky]supplement him with vitamins/mineral.

    [b]Any brand recommand? [/b][/quote]

    Canine Plus [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=3[/url] is the brand that I use most often. I also frequently prescribe
    Nu-Pet antioxidants [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=3&products_id=12[/url],
    Eggshelent Calcium [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=39[/url] and
    Amino B-Plex [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=28[/url]. My specific recommendations would of course depend upon the needs of the individual.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: IBD in CATS #2923

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=jojoiscute]can you get a dry food without any carbs whatsoever? Any suggestions to keep Molly healthy?
    [/quote]

    ZiwiPeak “dry”is the closest you’re going to get [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=71[/url].

    For maximal health, stick with the fresh food feeding which you have been doing (and which is working). You can try mixing in some Ziwi and see if that works.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: HELP!!! What Should I Feed…. #2922

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=CFox759211] I would love any advice about what to feed, [/quote]

    Please read the detailed information in the diet section of my natural pet care library [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/pet_natural.html[/url] . Also take a look at [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=8&osCsid=f7cbb0e841ebcbb52c633659c02c8f17[/url].

    In general, fresh is best so feed the freshest food that you have available and can afford. Feed a variety of different foods in moderation. Organic is best (just like we should be eating).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Urgent Please My Dog Ate Bone Meal #2918

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=janetl1027]I need to find out how dangerous it is for a dog to eat bone meal that is used in gardening?[/quote]

    Usually not dangerous, but it depends on how much s/he ate in relation to the size of the dog and any preexisting medical conditions, e.g. kidney failure.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: When to switch puppy to adult food #2917

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Butafli593]Hi,
    At what age do I start giving my American Staffordshire Terrier adult food. [/quote]

    I would upgrade to a higher quality (fresh food) diet right away. This can be fed to puppys or adults. Read this booklet (pdf) for much more info:
    [url]http://www.wysong.net/apologize.shtml[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Shelter Italian Greyhound #2916

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=WyleBoy] He does well for a few days and then starts to pee on doors and walls.[/quote]

    This might be a urine marking problem rather than a housebreaking one. If he has not been castrated (or if he was older when neutered) then that is more likely.

    If he is urinating in certain particular spots, the odor from the urine may also be attracting him. To eliminate this I use a product called Zero Odor which works great to neutralize pretty much any scents.

    Also, if you catch him in the act you should tell him NO (don’t use his name) and take him right outside. Consider working with a dog trainer if this persists.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dogs and water and teeth brushing #2915

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Timber07′]How do we get our dog to become accustomed to baths?
    #2 How often should I be brushing his teeth?[/quote]

    1. Akitas don’t often need bathing. If you want to get him used to it then the key is positive reinforcement, go slowly, and [b]start young (now)[/b].

    2. Depends on the diet. If he is eating a RMB (Raw Meaty Bone) diet then tooth brushing is rarely required. Otherwise brush daily or at least a few times a week using a tartar control toothpaste (CET brand makes this).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: GABA for dogs? #2914

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=BillB]I’m wondering if GABA would help him [/quote]

    No, it probably will not. Pick up Rescue Remedy in your local health food store and give ~3 drops orally as often as needed. Please contact your vet in the am if pain persists.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-GABA other supplements and vitamins ARE NOT homeopathic remedies (please read [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/WhatIsHomeopathy.html[/url] for clarification).

    in reply to: E-coli in dog #2906

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hwatsonsalo] this was a vaginal culture,[/quote]

    I didn’t read anything in your description that would concern me. The vaginal vault can have bacteria in it normally (that’s why we need to do sterile urine cultures by catheterization or cystocentesis). I believe E.coli is a common contaminant of vaginal cultures.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: bad allergies #2905

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=gellsworth]If you can tell me how??? [/quote]

    Homeopathy.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: holistic treatment for dog’s allergies #2904

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=JaneS]Could you direct me at what the best forms of suppliments, how much and how often? [/quote]

    All of the supplements listed in the allergy section of my store [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=2[/url] can help significantly. All orders come with directions (as long as you supply the requested info). That being said, supplements, vitamins, allergy shots, etc. all still really just cover up the symptoms (of an underlying immune hypersensitivity).

    My best advice is to start working with an experienced veterinary homeopath to minimize/eliminate the underlying dynamic dysequilbrium which have caused the allergies. S/he will likely recommend specific nutritional changes as well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: This Coccidia has worn out it’s welcome. HELP! #2892

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=allicat]
    I need these parasites out of my life!!!! I’m pretty anxiety sticken over the whole thing, I would appreciate any guidance [/quote]

    You need to strengthen his natural resistance to the parasites Allison. A fresh food diet, Florazyme enzyme, probiotics, and homeopathic treatment will do that. The key is perserverance and optimal hygiene. I know, easier said than done, but at this point you need to be doing everything possible to help him.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: allergies #2891

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=DAVESLITTLEB]Any suggestions would be appreciated.[/quote]

    A fresh food, gluten-free diet, essential fatty acids with zinc and fish oils, trace minerals, antioxidants and [b]homeopathic care[/b] should definitely help.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: bad allergies #2890

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=gellsworth]
    Would removing him from the allergens (back to the city and cement) be of any help or is it too late?? He’s around 9 years old[/quote]

    Minimizing allergens will probably help (at least temporarily). Your best bet though is to deal with the underlying dynamic cause of the allergic symptoms by homeopathic care.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog problem #2889

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hannah7768]
    What do you suggest? Please help:-D[/quote]

    I would get him to the vet along with a stool sample tomorrow (if you haven’t already).

    D. Jeff

    in reply to: big problem with vaccinations #2888

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [[email protected]]Is there a homepathic vaccination for dogs? I know that there is one for humans and I would love one for dogs.[/quote]

    Homeopathy does not work like regular vaccination, whether for humans or dogs. There are definitely homeopathic ways to protect against infectious diseases, but not just by giving one specific homeopathic remedy in lieu of a vaccine.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat diabetes diet #2886

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=no1dude]My cat is 14 and newly diagnosed with diabetes. I’m looking to supplement the insulin shots with a better diet.[/quote]

    Excellent!! Diet is extremely important in management of feline Diabetes Mellitus. In some cases a high quality meat-based diet (with minimal carbohydrates) will reverse early diabetic changes. Wellness [b]canned[/b] food is a great choice.

    I also strongly advise you to do some reading on dietary management of diabetic cats. You can do so at my site or at [url]http://www.catinfo.org/felinediabetes.htm[/url] Also, sugarcats.com has a great community of diabetic cat owners and is dedicated to feline diabetic management.
    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: When to get a companion #2885

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=littlemisssuzieq]We were thinking that it could be the right time to get a puppy but just not sure. Would it be to much for her. Would she be bothered by the high energy of a new puppy? [/quote]

    Yes, I agree that a new puppy would be too much for her at this time. You could however adopt a wonderful older (and less active) dog through your local shelter or Dachshund rescue [url]http://www.drna.org/[/url]

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Puppy randomly walking funny #2875

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tuffyschance03]Please anyone help.[/quote]

    This is a very interesting symptom which may indicate episodic neurologic events (perhaps mini petite mals?). I would consult a veterinary neurologist if you want further diagnostic testing (or perhaps a simple exam and professional opinion is all that you will need).

    Therapeutically, start to work with a veterinary homeopath to prevent any progression of dis-ease and to hopefully resolve these odd events.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Blocked Tear Duct??? #2874

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=mait13]any help would be appreciated.[/quote]

    I’d recommend a visit to a veterinary ophthalmologist for definitive diagnosis. I agree that surgery for this problem in an aged dog is likely unnecessary.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Frequent Urinary Obstructions #2873

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=SaveStoli] I’m just looking for ideas, suggestions, anything!! Please help![/quote]

    This sounds like a problem with the tone of the muscle controlling urine outflow. Diagnostically, both contrast (with dye) studies and direct visualization (via cystoscopy) can be done.

    In my practice I treat these patients like any other that has a dynamic (energetic and functional) disease. Constitutional homeopathic care.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Carsick Puppy #2872

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ChrisO]I have a 16wo BC pup that suffers from carsickness.

    Is ginger really effective? Is there a remedy I might try? For that matter, should I? Or does this just go away with time?
    [/quote]

    Hi Chris-

    Yes, car sickness in pups often resolves as they mature. That being said, you can try a ginger capsule ([url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=23[/url]) 1 hour before riding or Rescue Remedy (upon getting in the car and every 5-10 minutes afterwards). Also, some dogs that vomit in the car do better in the front seat, with the windows open, or when the car is going slowly (but not on curves).

    Most importantly, you want to make riding in the car fun (and easy) so don’t stop exposing her to car rides. Start with short, slow rides to the park (or other fun places). Work up the length of the trip as she improves.

    Also, car sickness is sometimess just one clue that a dog needs constitutional homeopathic care. I strongly recommend consulting an experienced vet homeopath to augment the other wonderful natural rearing which you are doing with your dogs.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Worms and Neem Oil #2867

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=RussHall]wondering if I can use Cold Pressed Neem oil as an oral treatment for Worms as well.
    [/quote]

    I would not recommend this at all. Many conventional dewormers, e.g. Panacur, are much safer (and more effective).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Homeopathy and Hyperthyroidism #2866

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=alleycat01]I also am very interested in hearing if you are treating a cat homeopathically. [/quote]

    IMHO, hyperthyroid cats should always be treated initially with homeopathy (which is not herbal methods though potentized plants may be used).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Homeopathy for hyperthyroid cats #2865

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=alleycat01]Dr. Jeff,
    What treatment would you give homeopathically? [/quote]

    Homeopathic treatment is strictly individualized for each patient. The treating homeopath will need a detailed history (including a review of the previous medical records) +/- a physical exam before deciding what is best for your cat.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Herniated Disc. #2864

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=HARLEE123]Is is too soon to do physical therapy? [/quote]

    Not at all. Appropriate PT right after disc (and other) surgery, is very important.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Excessive Dog Drooling #2863

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=SammietheDog]What do you think? Is there a good exercise schedule that a dog should follow in the winter months?[/quote]

    I usually allow whatever exercise the dog will tolerate (as long as there is no physical reason to minimize exercise). In the hot weather this might be minimal, but on a beautiful cool day there should not be a problem.

    That being said, the drooling and coughing after exercise make me suspicious of heart problems. If a thorough cardiac exam by your vet is OK then I would consult a veterinary homeopath for early homeopathic treatment. This will help prevent further problems as she ages.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Homeopathic treatment for seizures #2862

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=EyeBob]What types of homeopathic treatments are suggested [/quote]

    I suspect that you are confusing homeopathic and holistic treatments. Since proper homeopathic treatment is [b]strictly individualized[/b], there really is no answer to your question. Holistically however I’d recommend a species-appropriate (meat-based and fresh food) diet, dimethylglycine and some antioxidants.

    The best holistic adjunctive advice can only be given by a veterinarian who knows all of the details of your dog’s case. Try to find someone locally who can help. If there is no one nearby, many of us can help by telephone/e-mail consultation.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Swollen sore under armpitt #2861

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Katelyn]any idea, please let me know.[/quote]

    The underarm lesion and vomiting may not be connected. For the latter I suspect a dietary issue and for the former you can use peroxide and aloe vera. If the sore doesn’t clear right up or if problems perist you really need a visit with your local vet.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: back legs not working again… #2860

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=cynthiab22] Does anyone have any suggestions about this?[/quote]

    I would advise consulting a surgical or neurologic disease specialist.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: coronavirus quarantine time #2856

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tigerlilly]

    My question is, how long to I isolate the new kitten from Darias, [/quote]

    Hi Diane-

    In this situation I think it’s more important to get your new kitten used to the new household. As you know, FIP is due to a *mutated* Coronavirus. IMHO, the disease of FIP can only be transmitted to others that are already imbalanced (immunologically).

    In my practice I advise early homeopathic and lifestyle treatment. This would include integrating the new kitten into your home without further delay.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy #2855

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=bmh]When discussing the survival rate of 3 months to 3 years with an average life span of 6 months, is this referring to a cat with a very progressed disease or one that simply has the disease?

    Is there anything I can do to slow or stop the progression of this disease with homeopathic care?

    [/quote]

    Hi Brandi-

    Most subclinical HCM cats can live many years (often a “normal” lifespan). The stats quoted for cats that already have clinical disease.

    You definitely should start treating homeopathically now as this will slow the progression of the disease.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: demadetic mange #2854

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Paul Case]He also doesn’t want us to take her out in public because he is afraid she will catch some other disease.[/quote]

    Demodex is often associated with an immune dysfunction. It is *typically* not contagious from dog to dog. In my opinion the most important thing in this young dog is proper socialization (achieved by getting her out as much as possible).

    Regarding immune function, I strongly advise addressing this issue NOW rather than waiting until other problems arise. You can best do this by consulting with an experienced holistic veterinarian and by starting to treat the internal imbalance homeopathically.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Poodle puppy help #2853

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=litebluidone]Anyone have any clue as to what some of her symptoms may be indicitive of? thanks.[/quote]

    First, puppy diarrhea + anemia often= hookworms. Have you checked 2-3 separate stool samples?

    Second, reaction to vaccinations and subsequent skin stores often indicate an early immune dysfunction (“allergies”). I’d advise homeopathic treatment ASAP.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Crate Training new pups #2852

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ocexpress]I was wondering about the span of time in the crate specifically at night. Being six weeks old

    .is this to young to crate train them?

    Should I wake them up to take them to the litter box, or will that create a different problem?[/quote]

    Congratulations on your new puppies. You definitely should start crate training right away. Read my puppy training guidelines which include how to crate train. Basically, at this age, they wiill likely need to GO OUT (do not paper or litter box train as this teaches them that it’s OK to eliminate in the house) 1-2 times overnight. Do not wake them up but keep them close so that you can take them out in a timely manner when they wake up.

    It is also very important to starrt socializing these puppys separately. Take them out in the car or visiting others ONE AT A TIME. Otherwise they will bond too closely with each other and not with you. Read the “How Dog’s Think” article in addition to the puppy training series.

    Most of all. Have fun with your new pups! They will be wonderful lifelong friends.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New Mom #2851

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Shyna]i was curious about other ideas, on how to prositivly train our baby. like time outs..[/quote]

    No need for any negative training. Read my puppy training articles and BUY A CRATE and start crate-training. You will also need to increase the activity level of this active puppy. Either hire someone to come in mid-day to play with the puppy or enroll in a doggy day care program. This (and most) puppys needs more activity.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Thyroid results #2840

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Laura Norie]
    1-Do the T4 and FT4 numbers indicate thyroid destruction or dysfunction?
    2-What other causes can there be for low basal thyroid levels if these dogs do not have thyroiditis?
    3-Are these values precursors for auto-immune thyroiditis?
    4-Can the T4 and FT4 numbers be influenced by diet and/or supplementation, other than Soloxine?
    5-Would glandulars and homeopathy be worth pursuing for either dog?
    [/quote]

    Hi Laura-

    Although I can’t address each dog’s specific results (as I’m not your vet), you do pose some general questions that I will try to answer (IMHO).

    1-Dysfunction.

    2-Many (genetic in many breeds and almost any illness).

    3-Precursors, no.

    4-Not significantly.

    5-Definitely. Realize though that improving the quantitative fuction of the partially destroyed thyroid glands will take more time than clinically improving the functional symptoms of hypothyroidism.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: food for diabetic cat #2839

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=bk1226]My 7 year old male cat has some symptoms of diabetes I am taking him to the vet but would like to know recommendations for a cat food if he is diabetic. ![/quote]

    If indeed he has diabetes, the most important dietary advice is to make sure he eats a meat-based diet. This means no dry food and either fresh meats or canned foods with low carbohydrate content, e.g. ZiwiPeak, Wellness, some Wysong, etc. Take a look at the info in my natural pet care library and at Dr. Pierson’s cat nutrition site for a wealth of info:[url]http://www.catinfo.org/felinediabetes.htm[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Tear stains #2830

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=AnnaC]would it be best to have a local vet check him [/quote]

    A physical exam is very helpful if you are going to work with someone long distance (a method which works very well IMHO). The best option would be an exam by an ophthalmologist, but many general practitioner vets can also do a thorough eye evaluation.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: ARTHRITIS – Sorry, it’s long #2829

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=YUCON]1-What kind of exercise should she do? She’s still bit on the overweight side.

    2-What kind of water should I give her? Distilled water is good?

    3-What supplements should I start with?
    [/quote]

    1-Steady exercise, e.g. walking/running, swimming, is great. Try to avoid anything too jarring, e.g frisbee. Add green beans to the diet and reduce the meat to help her lose weight (lots of exercise will help too of course).

    2-Distilled is fine but you need to add back the lost minerals. I would also consider supplementing with Trace Animinerals added to the water.

    3-Look at [url]https://homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=3&osCsid=ee4580db585494165c964bea42d59790[/url] Use good antioxidant, glucosamine sulfate, trace mineral and omega-3 supplements to start.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: cataracts #2824

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=lila]I would like to purchase an eye drop that I can send home to help my dog ..Thank you…[/quote]

    Take a look in my store at [url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=81[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: acupuncture for arthritis? #2823

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Berry and Willow] 1-takes 5 years for an accupunturist to qualify yet I could do so in 80hrs (plus coursework) I would be intersted in hearing more of you views.

    2- missinformed would be that by correcting the local imballance you are helping the whole.

    3- With regards to your views on localised treatments, what are your views on using ice, heat, ultrasound (pro inflamatory), massage locally?

    4- Can not a localised treatment stimulate a systemic response?

    5- To that end I would argue that every action does have a energetic effect working on the theory that all mater is infact energy.

    6. Would being treated techically well by someone who is in a strongly negative state of mind, or who is working purely for financial gain be better then being treated with less techincal skill but with a positive and loving attitude?[/quote]

    1. Thank you for making my point about depth (and length) of training. You only get a taste for TCM and learn “cookbook” accupuncture in a course that spans 80 hours. Financially however, 5 years is much less appealing. Of course with the proper desire, you can continue to learn and advance your knowledge while practicing. I just don’t see that happening with most vet acupuncturists.

    2. If you were referring to local removal of a lesion, I would disagree strongly. From the rest of your message however it sounds like you are talking more about palliation, e.g. using soothing topicals, chiropractic, massage, etc. “Taking the edge off” is fine.

    3. See #2. BTW-These aren’t just my views. The concept of “curing” the individual with a dis-ease vs. suppressing the specific disease symptoms, e.g. the local lesion, are shared by every Hahnemannian homeopath throughout the world.

    4. No. Healing has to be initiated by the Vital Force which gives life to every cell in the body. “Fixing” a local lesion (no matter how it is done) is harmful to the VF and will decrease length and quality of life. It will also increase susceptibility to other chronic problems.

    5. I agree.

    6. It is definitely better to be treated by an inexperienced healer than a money-grubbing, negative “expert”.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Peculiar Behavior for Dachshund #2821

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Duck Muffin]
    Does anyone know what this kind of behavior is? and how to solve it? Thanks for any help that you can give.[/quote]

    This is a great symptom that probably could be successfully addressed with homeopathy. Schedule a phone or in-office consultation with a vet homeopath.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-Had you ever left her alone for a week as you did in August (when this started)?

    in reply to: Missing cat returns home. How to bring him back to health? #2820

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    This link might help you figure out a good way to help pay vet bills so you can keep taking good care of the animals: [url]http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/what_you_can_do_if_you_are_having_trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: My dog has itchy, watery eyes #2819

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ashley511]ANy ideas what this could be? [/quote]

    This might be an allergy which is mainly manifesting as itchy eyes. It also could be an infectious conjunctivitis or a physical problem with the eye. I advise going for a vet exam if this persists.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Puppy walking funny… #2818

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=kristinrucker]I was just wondering if this is normal and he will grow out of it, or does it signify something serious that needs to be checked out? The puppy visited the vet before I received him a little
    Also, is there a specific brand of food that is best for small yorkie pups?[/quote]

    Hi Kristin-

    For a puppy to run funny is common and probably normal however there may also be a chiropractic mislignment. If this persists or gets worse a visit to a vet chiropractor would be a good idea.

    What you do regarding feeding is one of the most important decisions you ever will make regarding the long-term health and well-being for your pup. Take a look at [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/diet.html[/url] and [url]https://www.homevet.com/rules.html[/url] for my views on diet and puppy rearing.

    ZiwiPeak [url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=65[/url] and Wysong Archetype [url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=54[/url] are among the best commercial foods. As you will read in my articles, you should also be feeding some (or mainly) fresh food.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Itchy skin #2817

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=RysMom]Any suggestions? Why is it only in the winter this happens? All summer long he is fine.[/quote]

    Winter seasonality is not uncommon. When the windows get closed and houses shut up in the winter, some allergies (notably that to mold and dust mites) get worse. Either try to minimize the triggers, e.g. ventilate, vacuum use dust mite covers, or treat the underlying immune imbalance with homeopathy and nutrition.

    I know we spoke on the boards about this briefly last year. Have you been working with a vet homeopath?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dizzy dog #2816

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    See the reply in the homeopathy folder.

    in reply to: Bone stuck in mouth… #2815

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sickdog99]
    Just wondering if anyone had any advice on what i should do…[/quote]

    By this point I am sure that you have already had your vet manually remove the bone (assuming that neither you nor your dog was able to remove it yourselves). There really is no other way.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cyst #2814

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Zahra]What causes these? What holistic treatments are available?
    What is the chance for reoccurrance?[/quote]

    Skin growths of this sort (actually any local lesion) are an external manifestation of an internal imbalance, The trigger(s) of this imbalance can be anything from an infection, allergen, toxin, emotional stress, etc.

    Homeopathic treatment can often eliminate the imbalance in the young. Regarding the skin growth itself, it could be anything from a lipoma to a cyst or a tumor. Your vet’s exam is the best place to start investigating it.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat food #2813

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Lightling]Any recommendations on some food I can purchase while I continue my research? Any good websites that you want to recommend for researching?[/quote]

    Cats are best fed a [b]fresh[/b] (raw or lightly cooked), organic, meat-based diet. Read [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/feedingyourcat.html[/url] for much more info.

    On the way to this goal you can feed the highest quality commercial foods like ZiwiPeak air dried New Zealand meats [url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=71[/url] or Wysong Archetype [url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?cPath=8&products_id=53[/url] High quality (but more devitalized) canned foods are also much better than any dry food. ZiwiPeak, PetGuard, Wellness, Wysong, etc. all make very good canned foods.

    Regarding more research, I suggest you start with the great info collected in my natural pet library. There are also some great books in my bookstore.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog with allergies #2812

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=hwatsonsalo]She shakes and shakes. Sorry for such a long post,any suggestions?[/quote]

    Hi Heather-

    You might want to consider a gluten-free diet for your allergic dog. Although avoidance of allergic triggers is a form of palliation (covering up the symptom) it may be necessary if your dog is very, very uncomfortable. Avoid anything with wheat, barley, bran, spelt or rye (this Dr. Harveys Veg To Bowl is OK but not Canine Health). A totally grain free diet would help even more.

    Homeopathic treatment of ear infections (or any other “local lesion”) can be problematic when no other symptoms can be found by your vet homeopath. The good news is that in time, with proper diet and support, your dog’s Vital Force (chi, prana, whatever you call it) will strengthen allowing new symptoms to manifest. These will then help guide to a new homeopathic remedy.

    I also suggest that you avoid injection into acupuncture points or vitamins/supplements that could be modify subtle symptoms. If your dog gets very uncomfortable, try Rescue Remedy drops (repeated until effect). Benadryl and Ascriptin can also be given before bed if nothing else is helping. Of course this will make assessment of a recently given homeopathic remedy more difficult, so you should talk to your vet homeopath before doing this.

    I know from personal experience with my Poodle how difficult it can be to live with the dog with chronic ear “infections” (they usually aren’t infections). Poor Coqui has had problems off and on for over a year. However, while his occasional ear inflammations are being treated with homeopathy, he is also finally coming into his own cognitively and emotionally (he is 10).

    This is a general rule of [i]curative[/i] homeopathic treatment. While the presenting complaint, e.g. a skin growth, ear “infection”, etc. may persist, the dog is healthier overall. This leads to a better quality and longer life.

    What more could you ask?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Puppy madness #2811

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=C. Clifford]Anyone have any suggestions or advice. [/quote]

    Hi Carol. Sounds like a combination of both sexual maturity and trying to shift the dominance hierarchy (where you should be top dog).
    [url]http://www.dogsites.com.au/internet_library/train_dominant_dog.html[/url]

    If this behavior can not be dealt with behaviorally (through your trainer) then you definitely need to treat the vaccinosis issue with a vet homeopath.

    I would not recommend neutering as the next step because doing so could artifically suppress the symptom. Look at [url]http://theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] for a referral.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: farting!!!!!!!!!!! #2810

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=charlie’s mom]I thought I would get an email when someone replied to my post,
    Any suggestions[/quote]

    Yes. You can get an e-mail when someone replies to your question on this board. Since you didn’t that means that the feature is not enabled. Just go to the “UserCP” link [url]https://homevet.com/forum/usercp.php[/url] and check the box which will enable it.

    Regarding diet, you need to upgrade the diet and get away from dry food if you want to help optimize your pup’s intestinal function. Read my diet articles for what I mean by “optimize”. Start here: [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/diet.html[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Where do I put the crate? #2809

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Butafli593]Any thoughts or advice anyone has would be greatly appreciated.[/quote]

    Since she already likes her crate, and you want her to keep using it, try getting a smaller crate that you can put next to your bed. I agree with Anna that a “reassuring pat” will calm down most pups. Remember, before you adopted her she had been sleeping cuddled up with her siblings.

    In a few weeks you can start gradually moving the crate away from your bed and to a more appropriate location.

    Good luck and have fun.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: 8 week old pug puppy has diarrhea #2808

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=dfleisher]
    is this normal???[/quote]

    Sorry for the (very) late response.

    This is common but not normal. My advice is to start looking seriously at the underlying health of your puppy’s enteric (intestinal) immune system. The Albon may temporarily kill the coccidia, but as you have seen, it will come right back unless the immune system is working properly (you may also want to check for an active source of reinfection in the environment).

    Factors like diet, vaccinations, intestinal flora, and internal energetic equilibrium all need to be addressed. Take a look at my article about holistically raising your pup [url]https://www.homevet.com/rules.html[/url] and start consulting with a holistic (preferably homeopathically trained) vet. S/he will be an invaluable member of your pet health care team and will help you learn how to maximize quality and length of life.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: pup and cat @ war #2807

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=John & Karolynn]If we get the cat fixed and de-clawed will he calm down?
    Should we keep them seperate?[/quote]

    Yes, neutering may help. [b]DO NOT[/b] declaw. Keep his nails trimmed and look at [url]http://www.softpaws.com/faqs.html[/url] for an alternative.

    Also, read [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/petmeet.html[/url] for much more info. In the meantime, always supervise the puppy when she is around the cat and don’t let her chase him. Slow introductions will take time but almost always work well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dizzy dog #2806

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=pruffles]could not stand up. His eyes were also rolling around in his head. The vet has told me he has ‘dizzy dog’ syndrome

    What homeopathic remedies might I consider?[/quote]

    I would venture to say that by now Pruffles has improved and possibly even fully recovered. This “idiopathic” syndrome in (usually) older dogs comes on quickly and resolves spontaneously (often within a week or less).

    In vet school they called it “old rolling dog disease” because some dog’s are actually compelled to roll around on the ground due to their dysequilibrium (coming from an unknown cerebellar brain dis-order). They can also have repeated vomiting due to nausea.

    The treatment is “tincture of time” and general supportive care. Homeopathic intervention is usually not needed (or indicated) for this problem.

    Please let us know how he is doing if you read this post.

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Musculoskeletal Problem: How to diagnose? #2805

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Patricia Trolian]So my question is: if an x-ray won’t show anything, and an MRI is too dangerous because of they have to knock him out, how do we get an accurate diagnosis?[/quote]

    First, anesthesia nowadays is not particularly dangerous (except for severely compromised individuals). In a referral setting (where the MRI is done) there will be constant monitoring so it will be even safer than at a local vbet’s office.

    Second, why do you need a definitive anatomic diagnosis of the problem? IMO, this is only necessary if you plan to have surgery. It usually does not change the medical treatment plan and certainly will not if you are treating homeopathically (and therefore being guided by your dog’s signs and symptoms).

    Third, sequential therapy (ST) is not homeopathy as described by Hahnemann in the Organon. ST is using homeopathically prepared (dynamic) medicines allopathically (“this for that”). Here is some info that may help clarify:
    [url]http://www.theavh.org/petowners/ask.php[/url]

    All that being said, it sounds like you are making wonderful progress in Finster’s treatment, so keep up the good work. I wouldn’t worry about a definitive diagnosis (though MRI is the way to go if you decide to pursue one).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: I think my cat is run down #2804

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Berry and Willow] I would be really greatful if you could suggest anything else I can do to help him.[/quote]

    You [b]definitely[/b] should start working with an experienced veterinary homeopath. This is a deep symptom which needs expert treatment. Look at [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] for a referral.

    In addition, continued vaccinations are likely to be a contributing factor and though drugs might palliate the problem, they will not cure it.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Tear stains #2803

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=AnnaC]Would homeopathy get rid of tear stains?[/quote]

    Hi Anna, sorry for the slow reply-

    Congratulations on raising your dog naturally. IMHO it is the only way to go…

    That being said, the goal in natural rearing is to optimize health and maximize length and quality of life. This can only be fully accomplished by recognizing and [b]homeopathically treating[/b] early signs of internal imbalance.

    Excess tearing in dogs is one of those common but abnormal symptoms that tell the homeopath that the internal energetic equilibrium may be “out of whack”. Take a look at [url]https://www.homevet.com/common.html[/url] for more info about that topic.

    Of course there may also be a physical cause like distichiasis (an eyelash rubbing on the eye) or atretic (closed) tear ducts which may need to be dealt with physically.

    So what is the bottom line?? As the eye tearing is a sign of chronic (often inherited) dis-ease (especially in this breed), I would advise starting to work with an experienced vet homeopath. S/he will help establish optimal internal homeostasis and once that is achieved, the excess tearing should resolve.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: chocolate to dogs. yes? no? #2789

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=doglover4life]I’ve heard in the past that giving chocolate to a dog is very hazardous,
    I did hear that giving BAKERS chocolate to a dog is deadly[/quote]

    Hi Rick-

    Yes, chocolate is toxic though [i]most[/i] dogs can tolerate [i]some[/i] milk chocolate OK (as with the candy and cookies you gave). It’s kind of like a bee sting. Most people are OK afterwards but some get really, really sick.

    Bakers and dark chocolate are much more concentrated and these can be really problematic in smalll amounts (some dogs have died due to seizures from the cafffeine and other components in it).

    So it’s not really a myth, but possibly overstated by some (see the great book [b]”Scared Poopless”[/b] for more info about this phenomenon).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: farting!!!!!!!!!!! #2764

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=charlie’s mom]My new pup farts constantly, and it smells really bad! Is this normal? [/quote]

    Not if he is eating the right food (meat-based and fresh) and is healthy overall. What does he eat?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New, very fearful pup #2757

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Malia]
    Any other suggestions on speeding up the socialization issues, or is it just going to take time? There has been improvement this last week, but I guess I am just impatient! [/quote]

    Hi Malia-

    Don’t be impatient with this poor timid pup. He will sense your frustration and impatience. This will slow the process down even more.

    It is an excellent idea to feed everything by hand. This will speed up the bonding process which wil then speed up socialization (the more he trusts you the more he will be willing to venture into new situations).

    Expose him slowly to every possible new situation. Use food as a bribe for now but eventually, as he comes to trust you, praise and reassurance will be enough.

    This process may be slow at first but will pay off within a few months. He will both bond with you and become an integral, and happy, part of the family. Take a look at [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/puppy2.html[/url] for more specific tips.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hi any one can suggest a suppement #2756

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=smith12]any one can suggest a supplement whic effective also fo arthritic conditions[/quote]

    There are [b]many[/b]. Take a look at [url]https://homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=3[/url] for some of my favorites (especially glucosamine sulfate, Antiox, Sea Mobility, Nu-Pet, MSM, trace minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, etc.).

    They all can help along with diet upgrade, homeopathy, appropriate exercise, chiropractic care, etc.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog drooling #2755

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=gdhardy]We have a choc lab also she is only 4 years old but she does this every once in a while. It is just like a puddle on the floor.[/quote]

    Hi Diane and Katie-

    This type of hypersalivation is quite common. Frequently one particular cause or trigger can not be found. If this isn’t asssociated with hunger, nausea, certain foods (digestible and not), tooth/mouth problems, etc. then it has an energetic basis.

    Frequently, homeopathic treatment (which is often started based on purely functional, energetic symptoms such as this) can resolve this problem. You don’t need (and often can’t find) a definitive diagnosis to treat vague symptoms such as this.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Wobbler’s Syndrome #2754

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=dee] so not quite sure how to adequately tweak his nutrition.
    Also, I read about possible acupuncture/chiropractic treatments for this. [/quote]

    Hi Dee-

    As I’m sure you know, “Wobbler’s Disease” is very common in this breed. It has indeed been associated with hypothyroidism, so a free t4 and TSH would be a good idea (along with a general screen including a complete blood count, biochemical profile and urinalysis).

    There is very effective early management of this “dis-ease” using nutritional (including some supplementation like grape seed extract, trace minerals, fish oils, etc.) management and homeopathy. Chiropractic and acupuncture can help as well but tend to be more palliative.

    As the cervical instabilty of Wobbler’s is usually a manifestation of a chronic energetic imbalance (another manifestation of which is the digestive enzyme or thyroid hormone deficiencies) I find that homeopathic management is most effective (by far).

    Chiropractic care, homeopathy and good nutrition all go hand in hand. You should first consult a trained homeopathic vet so you can start [i]preventing[/i] problems that will crop up later in life.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat with bald spot #2753

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Teri]She had all of her initial vaccinations after I adopted her in 2000[/quote]

    Even though it is years since vaccination, this may very well be a manifestation of vaccinosis (read the article on this topic in my natural pet care library).

    You can try adding essential fatty acids (like EFA-Z+) which may help on a physiologic level.

    My best advice though is to consult an experienced homeopathic vet who can treat the imbalance at an energetic level. Since riding in the car is stressful, you should also consider a phone consultation. A veterinary homeopath can work very effectively long-distance in conjunction with your local vet (who will do any examination and diagnostic testing).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Strange dog behavior……………. #2747

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Dukeroscoe1]Roscoe has been staying outside almost all of the time
    Does anyboody have any idea’s about this behavior?[/quote]

    Definitely! This symptom is higly significant. It indicates that Roscoe’s body is subtly out of balance. At this point it may be only functional (there is nothing “abnormal” on examination or possibly even laboratory evaluation). The underlying energetic problem however may well lead to significant medical problems eventually (in which case he will become clinically “sick”).

    This type of early dis-ease is best treated right away (before it progresses) with homeopathy. Consult a trained and experienced veterinary homeopath who will be able to help further by individualizing treatment specifically for Roscoe. Find someone at [url]http://www.avhlist.com/index.php[/url]

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: pup and cat @ war #2746

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=John & Karolynn]
    If we get the cat fixed and de-clawed will he calm down?
    Should we keep them seperate?[/quote]

    Please read my introducing new pets info at [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/petmeet.html[/url] and get back to me if you have further questions.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat Mites #2743

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=zeke]Has anyone found a remedy or solution for the mite problem? [/quote]

    Any oil (I use almond oil or mineral oil) in the ear will eventually smother ear mites and eliminate the problem in [b]most[/b] cats. Some cats however have such a strong susceptibility to the mites that they will not permananetly improve until they are treated with internal homeopathic remedies (these are not vitamins or supplements so please read more about homeopathy if these are all that your “homeopathic” vet is using for treatment).

    The most common reason for treatment failure is insufficient quantity of oil used or incomplete cleaning of debris. You may need to make frequent trips to the vet for thorough cleaning if it is difficult for you.

    In addition, the back of the neck should be sprayed with Neem or similar to prevent the little buggers from living there.

    Good luck! This can be a lifelong problem for some people so thorough treatment at this point is very important.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: lyme #2742

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sue1jeff]any ways we can help. she is getting rice and cooked meat in small amounts.
    [/quote]

    What form of cooked meat are you using? Many dogs do not tolerate cooked animal fats. You may want to try low fat cottage cheese in place of cooked meat. This is a much blander protein source and therefore easier to tolerate.

    Also, boiling the meat and skimming off the fat is another alternative.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat with bald spot #2735

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Teri]Do you have any other ideas about what may be causing her bald patch and treatment options?[/quote]

    What is you cat eating? What is the vaccination history and any association between vaccination and onset of this balding patch? Are you working with a holistic (preferably homeopathic) vet in addition to the vet which you mentioned?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Brain Tumor in 10 yr old lab (male) #2734

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [[email protected]]I have a 10 year old yellow lab who has a tumor on the brain stem. If anyone has had experience with this condition please share them with me.

    Thank you.[/quote]

    This is a complex question that totally depends upon the specific state of the individual. I strongly suggest that you contact an experienced, well-trained veterinary homeopath who can then develop a treatment plan for your dog.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: bladder stones (need explanation) #2726

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=lindatoo]My question is if the stones are different types how can one diet (commercial) prevent all types of stones from forming.[/quote]

    That is puzzling to me as well. The various diets are formulated to promote a specific urine pH such that the stone-forming crystals are minimized.

    You (or the new owner) will likely need to adjust the diet based on the results of frequent urinalyses.

    Of course the best therapeutic option, in my opinion, is to seek homeopathic care to reduce the underlying imbalance which is promoting both types of crystals.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Ear Problems #2724

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=araceli670]my dog has had like a rash on her inner ear.. not in the canal but on the ear itself.. ([/quote]

    Try massaging in aloe vera and/or calendula gel to the area three times a day.

    I have also had great success using the 7 Healing Cream on areas like this. It can be found in my store at [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/[/url]

    If it persists, especially since it is bothering her, you should get her back to your vet so s/he can examine the area.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: very constipated little girl #2723

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=canadianchicklet] only a pea size very compacted poo has come out,we can see it in her rear end, its stuck there,

    shes hardly eating and drinking, she seems to be alright despite not being herself,

    we just fed her eagle puppy, perhaps this is the problem, its a possiblity as well that she got ahold of a bone from ribs, [/quote]

    Firstly, if you can see the stool that is stuck you should gently pull it out (which is exactly what the vet would do before performing a rectal examination to make sure that nothing else is obstructing her lower colon).

    The diet change you mentioned [i]shouldn’t[/i] cause a problem though a piece of a cooked rib bone certainly could (never feed [b]cooked[/b] bones).

    If she’s hardly eating you may want to tempt her with some fresh white meat chicken or some meat-based human baby food to increase her intestinal motility. Small amounts of prune juice (dropper it right in her mouth) will also help.

    If she continues to not eat or drink you really need to get her to a vet. Bring a stool sample when you go so that they can also check for intestinal parasites which could be contributing to her problem.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Bowel movement while sleeping… #2718

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=timb]Is there something we can give him for bowel control [/quote]

    Hi Timothy-

    There can be lots of reasons for fecal incontinence (during sleep or otherwise). At this age, especially in a large dog (that tend to age more quickly than smaller dogs) I would start investigating the cause and treatment with a visit to your vet. Bring a stool sample to help rule out parasites.

    If you still don’t get an answer then I would consult a homeopathic vet.
    S/he will treat this symptom as just one of the many low-grade energetic issues which your older dog may be experiencing (common but not normal symptoms [url]https://www.homevet.com/common.html)[/url]. Once the internal dynamic imbalance is corrected, this symptom should resolve.

    Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] if you need a referral.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help..Dog Will NOT eat #2717

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=shelly]All she did was eat around her dog food to get to that.
    I need advice please, she really needs to eat [/quote]

    Try feeding her fresh food (which is healthier and more palatable) rather than commercial, highly processed dog food. Please read some of the extensive nutritional information on this site to get more specific ideas.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Sorry for the mental picture but poop eating #2706

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=lisalj3]

    Is there something you recommend I put in her food that will stop this?

    I wonder why she’d start this at 7???
    [/quote]

    Good questions! First of all, it’s important to realize that coprophagia (stool eating) is just a sign of internal imbalance. It can signal many things. It may just be that you are feeding an improper diet (what do you feed?). At this age however it could also be an early clue of a more serious metabolic, physiologic problem (liver, kidneys, etc.).

    Regardless, there is an underlying energetic disturbance which needs to be dealt with by a veterinary homeopath. I would start by having a baseline work up (stool exam, bloodwork, urinalysis) and then consulting an experienced gveterinary homeopath for further help. You can find a referral at [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url].

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-For quick-fix temporary resolution of stool eating you can mix some Adolf’s Meat Tenderizer in with the food. If that doesn’t work tried canned spinach.

    in reply to: early kidney failure? #2705

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=anneh]As he is losing protein I presume I should feed him more protein Also keep reading not to use grains so I am overwhelmed with worry what to do.[/quote]

    Hi Anneh-

    First of all, it is very important not to feel overwhelmed. Although proper holistic management of this disease may seem daunting at first, an experienced veterinary homeopath will definitely be able to guide you.

    You are right that protein, specifically albumin, loss through the kidneys is a major concern and that balancing correct diet is essential. Although restricting protein may be useful in end-stage kidney disease, it is not something I recommend. I manage many, many case of glomerulonephritis +/- Lyme and one of the keys is maintaining a high quality diet. Meaty bones are still great as are other meats even though they contain phosphorus. It is the [b]quality[/b] of the protein that is most important not so much the quantity or phosphorus content.

    Every case is different however so I urge you to start working with an experienced holistic (preferably homeopathically trained) veterinarian.

    Other useful adjuncts include fish oils, trace minerals, renal glandulars, Coenzyme Q-10, etc. They can all be found in my supplement section at
    [url]https://www.homevet.com/osc/[/url].

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cancer #2704

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Eileen]mixed mammary tumor
    We are looking to cure her homeopathically we do not want to do chemo on her. They said she has 6 months to live.
    What is the difference between Homeopathic and Holistic treatment?[/quote]

    Hi Eileen-

    I am so sorry to hear about your dog’ cancer. In my opinion, homeopathic treatment along with holistic nutritional adjunctive therapy is how to best treat this disease.

    That means proper, species-appropriate meat-based nutrition, specific supplements like bovine tracheal cartilage, fish oils, antioxidants, etc. and most importantly [b]dynamic treatment with homeopathy[/b]. This three-pronged regimen will provide the best quality of life for your dog in my experience.

    Consult a veterinary homeopath experienced in cancer treatment to start on this path right away.

    Good luck. Feel free to post any questions here and keep us updated on your dog’s progress.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-read [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/homeopat.html[/url] for a quick primer on holistic vs. homeopathic

    in reply to: Pre op bloodwork before spaying (need advice) #2692

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Madilyn’s mom]consider having extra blood work done on her prior to surgery.

    I also hate the thought of not doing the bloodwork and possibly having something happen to her.

    Madilyn shows nothing but perfect signs of good health[/quote]

    My opinion is that you [b]definitely[/b] should do the blood testing. The minimal stress of having the small amount of preanesthetic bloodwork drawn is far outweighed by the risk of not having it done. Here is some more info from about.com:
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    My pet is young and healthy — why is bloodwork needed?
    ?The short answer is to make sure your pet is completely healthy “inside and out” prior to subjecting your pet to anesthesia and surgery.While spays and neuters are performed often, this doesn’t mean that they are simple. These surgical procedures require as much knowledge about the patient’s health prior to surgery as possible.
    A full history and physical examination should be part of the preoperative visit. This rules out any health concerns you may have and allows the vet to assess your pet’s weight, heart condition, and any health problems that should be addressed prior to surgery (or immediately after).
    Many veterinary clinics have the capability to do “in-house” lab work — meaning that they can run a simple blood test right in the office to check basic liver and kidney blood values. In a young healthy animal with no history of problems, we would expect that these values would be within the normal ranges. But what if they aren’t? The possibility exists that there could be an undetected congenital problem or subclinical problem that hasn’t manifested clinical signs yet. This type of early detection would warrant investigation, and in the case of an elective surgery, postponement until the pet is deemed ready. For animals that have a normal preoperative blood panel, congratulations! your pet is healthy, and this blood work will provide a good foundation for your pet’s health record. This baseline panel will serve as a reference point as your pet matures.
    For clinics that offer preoperative bloodwork, many times there are various “packages” that are offered, from basic testing to more complete testing. Discuss with your veterinarian the tests available, what level of testing is appropriate for your pet, and to address any concerns that you have.

    in reply to: Chewing on paws #2685

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=jr365] could my brothers dogs problem somehow affected my dog?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.[/quote]

    Manny’s foot chewing may indeed be coincidence, it may be a learned (copied) behavior, or it may be result of stress or any number of other factors.

    For the red sore areas Aloe vera is most effective. Buy some 99-100% pure gel at the health food store and massage it in three times a day (any he licks off will also help internally). Warm epsom salt soaks and/or cool compresses of the feet can also help.

    In general, itchiness of any kind (e.g. due to allergies) is an external expression of some internal imbalance. Allergy is really just a non-specific immune hypersensitivity which results from this imbalance. Any topical or systemic anti-itch treatment can only provide a temporary bandaid for the underlying problem. Homeopathic treatment however can be permanently curative (my own lifelong allergies were cured by homeopathic treatment and this in fact is why I became a homeopath).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Anorexic cat #2684

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Diane]Do you have any suggestions I havn’t discussed here?[/quote]

    Have you had her blood and/or urine rechecked since she became ill? The April blood work will be a great baseline against which to compare her kidney, thyroid, liver, etc., values.

    The best therapeutic option for her at this time is to start getting treated homeopathically. Contact an experienced homeopathic vet who will treat the underlying internal imbalance which is causing the symptoms. Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] for a referral.

    Please let us know what happens.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Ear mites. Can I use Neem Oil on a cat? #2676

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=StickToYerGuns] Isn’t that just going to drown them like the olive oil?[/quote]

    Yes. If this was truly just ear mites then the oil should have relieved the problem as long as sufficient quantities were used to kill the mites.

    There is another critical factor however which is not being adressed. There must be an underlying susceptibility (“immune weakness”) for any disease, infection or parasite to persist. In this case, the skin’s natural defenses are not working properly because of an underlying energetic imbalance.

    Schedule a time for an initial evaluation and ear cleaning by your local AVH vet. After the vet cleans the ears for the first time and starts treatment with the indicated remedy, do your best to continue cleaning with almond oil. Straight Neem can be toxic. Cats are very sensitive as you know.

    Go back in 2 weeks for followup and repeat ear cleaning. Continue working internally as well as with the bimonthly professional ear cleanings.

    This will do the trick.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dramatic weight loss in elderly bassett #2675

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=abbysmom]Any thoughts or suggestions??[/quote]

    A definitive diagnosis should be sought before treating empirically. If your regular vet doesn’t have one I would seek the opinion of an internal medicine specialist.

    Instead of just waiting and seeing (which is always better than over treating) you should immediately start treatment with an experienced vet homeopath. S/he will treat the underlying energetic disease process which resulted in the physiologic manifestations of the disease. This imbalance caused both the clinical signs/symptoms as well as the biochemical abnormalities.

    Good luck. Please let us know what you do.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dramatic weight loss in elderly bassett #2671

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=abbysmom]I have an 11 year old bassett hound who in the last few weeks has lost a significant amount of weight.

    Have not been to the vet yet.[/quote]

    Let’s first see what the vet exam, blood and urinalyses show.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Need firm stools #2670

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Manfred]Could he be unsettled due to the change?[/quote]

    Has he been checked for internal parasites with fecal exams?

    Any big environmental change can cause bowel troubles in susceptible individuals. It is also possible that this is has been a long-standing problem. Regardless, a diet upgrade, probiotics, l-glutamine, etc. may all be indicated. Take a look at [url]https://homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=6&osCsid=690889502c35b3cfbbf5f51916ba0a8b[/url] for even more specific suggestions.

    It is also extremely important to start homeopathic treatment at the same time (or even before adding any nutritional supplements). This will reduce and hopefully eliminate the underlying disturbance which has resulted in the problem (which can only be palliated with diet and supplements).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Flax Seeds/Fish Oil #2662

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Gardariki]I read flax seeds are rich in Omega 3. Can it be substituted for fish oil for dogs?[/quote]

    Due to benefits of fish oils that you don’t get from flax I usually recommend sticking with the omega-3s from fish. If you [b]must[/b] switch then, in general, a 1:1 substitution works fine.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Kittens with goopy substance in eyes! please help #2661

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Doomer] It then spread to the other kittens, what should i do? what is this? [/quote]

    It sounds like a typical upper respiratory virus. Any other symptoms? Sneezing, coughing, wheezing…?

    You need to keep their little eyes free of discharge with a warm, wet cloth. Use this same cloth to apply warm, wet compresses over their eyes 3-4 times a day. If they do not improve in a day or two then you need to see your vet.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: demodex #2651

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=xdogladyx] i was wondering if there are any good supplements/herbs/remedies that will help him. I’m sure he could use some immunity boosting, if nothing else.[/quote]

    Hi Steph. Great question!

    As I’m sure you know, this type of recurrent demodex is almost always associated with an underlying immne deficiency. You are very wise to pursue a more holistic approach at this point rather than waiting until more serious problems arise.

    That being said, although his lifestyle is far superior to what it had been, he could use more fresh foods and less grains/fillers (which make up at least 50% of all kibble). Stick with human quality meats which you can buy on sale at your local grocery store (usually quite affordable).

    There are A LOT of immune boosting supplements. You can see some of them in the immune stimulation area of my online pharmacy. Go to
    [url]https://homevet.com/osc/index.php?cPath=2[/url].

    The most cost effective way of treating the underlying problem however is good nutrition together with homeopathic treatment. Read more in my natural pet care area [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/pet_natural.html[/url] about homeopathy.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Discharge from penis #2650

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=mcclure]My 14 month old Basset Hound has a yellow/green discharge from his penis. What do you think this is and what can I do about it?[/quote]

    This may be normal smegma which is usually a creamy greenish discharge that comes from the glands lining the prepuce. If that indeed is the cause then this may just be a transient developmental stage. Alternatively, especially if it persists or becomes problematic, it may be an early warning sign of imbalance (see [url]https://www.homevet.com/common.html[/url] for more info).

    Go to your vet for an exam. See what s/he says. Even if this is a “normal” discharge you should consider working with a homeopathic vet to help achieve an optimal balance in your young dog’s life force.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New Puppy- Worms? #2649

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Belle & Nye’s Mommy]is Sun-Tues too long to wait for her to receive a worming tab if necessary? She has not been de-wormed yet.[/quote]

    Not at all. Just bring a stool sample to the vet for analysis before giving a broad-spectrum dewormer. It’s always nice to know what truly needs to be treated before gving drugs (which may not be necessary).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: CHF and allergies #2644

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Bremsech]
    Do you have any advice as to what we can do to alleviate Kirby’s allergy symptoms without compromising his heart condition? I am assuming his allergies are pollen and such because mine have also been flaring up recently.
    [/quote]

    Hi Charlotte-

    First I want to say welcome and I am so glad that Kirby is doing well. That’s wonderful that your vet is willing to integrate some natural medicine into his practice.

    There are lots of holistic and natural options for allergy improvement. First and foremost would be to stop the commercial diet and anything containing grains/carbs. Fresh food feeding of meats, poultry, fish, etc. is the way to go here. There are even commercial foods that are viable in this case such as ZiwiPeak form New Zealand, Wysong Archetype, Honest Kitchen Force/Embark or many of the fresh frozen diets, e.g those from Bravo or Canz. In addition you should be adding phytonutrients such as those from steamed kale and blueberries.

    For specific supplement recommendations take a look in the allergy section of this websites store ([url=”https://www.homevet.com/osc”]https://www.homevet.com/osc[/url]). In general, fatty acids and antioxidants are a mainstay. In Kirby’s case I would also use Respirall for allergy support.

    Good luck and keep up the good work with Kirby.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hi just joined and have a question about raw salmon #2641

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=melissa]find out good solid info on feeding it to my guys so I can decide if I want to let them try it or not.
    [/quote]

    If you are still working with the holistic vet then that s/he may be your best source of information about feeding a natural diet.

    I also love Michelle Bernard’s excellent book on natural cat rearing. It is well researched and will give you many practical tips. You can find an excerpt in my natural pet library. Her direct URL is [url]http://www.raisingcatsnaturally.com/[/url].

    In general raw salmon is fine depending on the source. As [b]moderation and variety[/b] are very important factors when feeding a fresh food diet, I would just integrate the salmon into the diet rather than relying on it exclusively.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New Puppy coming soon #2640

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=AnnaC]So how do I go about developing a working relationship with you as you would be the one I’d call. [/quote]

    Hi Anna-

    It’s easy!! First read my new client information at [url]https://homevet.com/newclient/index.html[/url]. Then fill out and mail or fax your questionnaire and treatment agreement. Call the office when this is done and then we will talk about your preventative needs.

    Thanks so much for your interest.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Struvite Crystals #2636

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=My Cats’ Mom]
    Any advice?[/quote]

    [b]No dry food[/b] (at all). The more fresh (real) food the better. Especially beef (which will increase acidification of the urine). The better the diet, the fewer the urinary symptoms as this is a markedly diet-related disease (with emotional stress being a close second causative factor IMHO).

    In addition, you should be using vitamin C and Cranberry NS and pushing fluids as much as possible (water, milk, chicken broth, etc.). Consult an experienced veterinary homeopath so that you can start internal energetic treatment of her imbalance right away. This will both help the immediate symptoms as well as reduce the likelihood of recurrence (or other deeper symptoms).

    Good luck with Tweak.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: New Puppy coming soon #2635

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=AnnaC]what I should have on hand if I should call you with those dreaded initial symptoms of parvo. [/quote]

    Hi Anna-

    Congratulations on starting out right with your new pup. By far the best advice I can give you (without having treated the pup) is to develop a working relationship with a vet homeopath soon after (or even before) he arrives.

    At first please limit exposure to infectious disease-concentrating situations (kennels, dog parks, groomers, vet hospitals, etc.) but encourage short exposure to other “healthy” dogs. This will allow gradual development of natural immunity. Proper diet, fresh air, exercise and lots of TLC will also foster the development of a strong immune system. It is these strong defenses and not vaccinations or antibiotics that truly are the best defense against infectious disease.

    No need to buy expensive products prophylactically as long as you are mindful of exposure and know the early warning signs (vomiting, listlesssness, lack of appeite, diarrhea, etc.) so you can contact someone immediately if necessary.

    Good luck and enjoy your new pup.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Post Feline-PU Surgery Problems #2631

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=SheRat]
    Can he be blocked again? I have not been feeding him any “store bought” food at all since he got home. Has he decided he likes the attention he gets when he acts blocked? The vet STILL has not called me back about this problem…[/quote]

    Good morning.

    Although it’s theoretically possible for him to reblock, it would be very unusual. Most blockages occur in the narrow part of the urethra in the penis, and since he doesn’t have one anymore…

    PU surgery however does not change his predisposition to develop urinary symptoms. Urinary frequency, urgency, straining to urinate, blood in the urine, etc. can all still be seen.

    It is this remaining underlying imbalance which is causing the present urinary symptoms. It is also likely causing him to not feel well and therefore defecate around the house.

    Bring him back to the vet today to be checked out-just in case. I would also [b]strongly[/b] recommend consulting a veterinary homeopath to treat the underlying energetic imbalance. You can find a referral at: [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Lymphnoma carcinoma #2630

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Jackie Wanagat]can get you a remedy (pellet) remedy that will take care of the situation just like heartguard does but without potential side effects. You have to put this pellet in their water one week per month (of course changing the water every couple of days but still it works great! Good luck[/quote]

    Actually there is no homeopathic or other natural remedy that does this. Although homeopathic optimization of the immune system can minimize risk of heartworm and negate many of its’ negative effects, there is no remedy that has the same effect as this medication. I wish there was. Fortunately [i]most [/i]dogs can take Heartgard without ill effects.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Vaccinations #2629

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Jackie Wanagat]My question to you is how do you feel about vaccinations in general but specifically distemper.
    My dog is a stay at home dog and he does not go to kennels nor hang around with other dogs. Just his brother which my sister purchased when I got this one. Thanks[/quote]

    Welcome to the HomeVet forum Jackie-

    I think the beginning posts in this folder give a clear picture of my views on vaccination.

    A low Distemper titer is not unusual and does not necessarily correlate with poor immunity to the Distemper virus ( it is very difficult to quantitate immune competence and titers only measure one fraction of immune function).

    In your dog’s case I don’t see much risk of exposure, so where’s the benefit of vaccination…?

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-read the great book “Scared Poopless” [url]http://www.dogs4dogs.com/[/url] to get more info on making informed vaccination (and other) decisions.

    in reply to: Renal failure HW+ #2624

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Emily]
    So, I’m here out of desperation really, trying to learn if there is ANY alternative treatment which could possibly save his life that we could try when we take him home tomorrow.
    [/quote]

    There’s always a lot that can be done beyond strictly conventional care. Without a diagnosis however, it is impossible to say what and how. Heartworm disease is definitely treatable and if the kidney failure is due to the heartworms then perhaps that would then improve as well.

    If you want to go further I would first advise consulting an internal medical specialist [url]http://www.acvim.org/Specialist/Search.aspx[/url] to see if there is more that can be done conventionally. At the same time I would advise consulting a vet homeopath [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php[/url] for internal curative treatment.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Natural Flea Treatments #2622

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=batman]How often and how much would you spray your mini with this solution?
    [/quote]

    Anytime there is likely to be exposure, e.g. before a walk in the woods.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Should I get the Lyme Vaccination for my dog? #2620

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=banables] I think too many vaccinations can compromise his immune system.
    Which is the worse of the 2 evils?…[/quote]

    What a great question! I’m glad you asked.

    My opinion is that [b]by far[/b] the best way to prevent Lyme disease (or any infectious disease for that matter) is to foster a strong immune system. All of the vaccinations, antibiotics, antivirals, etc. in the world are not going to work without a functional immune system.

    That being said, it is also clear that vaccination often compromises the immune system and predisposes to many diseases (so-called immune-mediated diseases).

    My practice is dedicated to building natural immunity and thereby reducing the risk of infections and chronic diseases. I do not give Lyme vaccinations even though I practice in the heart of Lyme country (in fact quite close to Lyme, CT itself!).

    The incidence of acute infection (Lyme or otherwise) in my patients who have been holistically and homeopathically reared is very, very low. I see many more “chronic Lyme” disease cases. These patients invariably have been vaccinated for Lyme and treated with antibiotics (with homeopathic treatment you don’t need antibiotics for eliminating acute Lyme as I demonstrated myself six years ago when cured of Lyme in 72 hours without antibiotics or persistent symptoms).

    Anyway, I could ramble on and on about Lyme treatment but I think you get the point. As far as Frontline or other carcinogenic anti-tick chemicals are concerned I recommend reading [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/documents/fleachemfin.pdf[/url]

    The best tick remedy is daily tick-checks and removal using the Trix Tick remover [url]https://homevet.com/osc/product_info.php?products_id=1&osCsid=ab63f291a16ed4125cb98ac86ff47238[/url] I also use Detox powder, Vetline Yeast and Liver and Neem Protect spray as all-natural alternatives to tick and flea chemicals.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Distemper vaccine and cancer? #2617

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=VonTorrGSD]Any ideas or direction? I’d like to get more information.[/quote]

    Nothing specific to this tumor type. In general, it is critical to be feeding the best fresh food diet possible (staying away from all carbs). There are also many useful natural supplements (e.g., bovine tracheal cartilage, Oncoplex, IP-6,maitake extract, antioxidants, fish oils, etc.).

    Most important though is to contact an experienced, well-trained veterinary homeopath who will treat the underlying cause of the tumors including the vaccine reaction.

    I know that this is a difficult time, but good care (and plenty of TLC) will help your dog have the best quality and longest life possible.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: sarcoma in right hock #2615

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=caninejojo]Will homeopathy help to avoid or at least, minimise the chase of the tumor recurring? If yes, what would you recommend?[/quote]

    Homeopathic treatment will definitely help her body regain balance and thereby minimize recurrence. My personal preference is to always begin treatment [i]before[/i] the surgical suppression of tumor removal and then continue afterwards. In your dog’s case where I presume that she has not been homeopathically treated before, I would consult a vet homeopath ASAP.

    In homeopathy, there is no “this for that” treatment, so it is impossible to give more specific details about homeopathic remedies without knowing the totality of her case (the tumor specifics are only a very small portion of it).

    If you are referring to holistic recommendations of diet and supplements, that’s a different story (remember holistic is not the same as homeopathic). A fresh food, meat-based diet without carbs is essential. Antioxidants (I love Nu-Pet wafers and Antiox), omega-3 fatty acids, bovine tracheal cartilage, IP-6, maitake extract, etc., are all useful supplements in a situation like this. More info about these can be found in my supplement store.

    Bottom line is that you should be working with a holistic (preferably homeopathically-trained and experienced) vet.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Please Help…I have a baby kitten with an eye injury #2613

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ginam] I believe that it is an eyeworm. I don’t know if there is anything I can do for it myself[/quote]

    Yech!! Here’s some more info:

    Nemadode of the Eye
    Thelazia (Eye Worm) Infection
    Etiology – Thelazia spp., are small (up to 19 mm long), white nematodes found associated with the eye of dogs, cats and other animals. They are found in the conjunctival sac, under eyelids and the nictitating membrane. As many as 100 may be present and they can be seen moving rapidly across the eye.
    Occurrence – Thelazia californiensis infects dogs and cats in North America; T. callipaeda infects dogs in Asia.
    Life Cycle – Eggs containing larvae are laid by females. The intermediate hosts are the so-called filth flies including Musca spp. The fly ingests first stage larvae while feeding on lachrymal secretions. Larvae develop to third stage and move to the mouthparts of the fly from which they infect the eye while feeding on ocular secretions.
    Clinical Features – Signs include conjunctivitis, excessive lachrymation, photophobia, keratitis and in the absence of treatment corneal opacity and ulceration.
    Diagnosis – Worms can be seen in the eye with the naked eye. Finding eggs and larvae in ocular secretions.
    Treatment and Control –
    Removal of worms under local anesthesia. Application of ocular preparations containing levamisole or morantel or administration of the former orally or parenterally.
    Fly control with insecticides if feasible.

    in reply to: Please Help…I have a baby kitten with an eye injury #2611

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ginam] it is swollen shut and has lots of pus coming out. There is a visible hole in the eyelid. I need to know if there is anything that I can possibly do for this kitten. [/quote]

    An eye problem like this warrants immediate veterinary care. The eye may indeed have been injured or these symptoms may be from a Herpes (or other) eye infection. Frequent hot compresses and the amino acid l-lysine daily might help if that is the case.

    Only a vet exam can tell for sure and a routine exam really isn’t that expensive. If you can’t afford *any* care then this document might help:
    [url]http://www.hsus.org/pets/pet_care/what_you_can_do_if_you_are_having_trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html[/url]

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat still nursing 4 month old kittens #2609

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Sylva76]the mother still insists on nursing them. Is this normal?

    should I just let her take care of all of them?[/quote]

    Some feline mothers will nurse their young until physically removed from them. I would definitely remove the older kittens as they are draining their mother’s metabolic resources needlessly. Of course the new kittens should be allowed to nurse for 6 -8 weeks more (if she can handle it).

    [b]Do not[/b] let her outside again until she is spayed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Yellow Lab Suffering From Laryngeal Paralysis #2608

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=KAREN]I would also immediately like to start him on whatever homeopathic and holistic options I can, [/quote]

    Excellent approach (integrative medicine at its best)!!

    I recently treated a very, very similar situation in an even [b]older[/b] dog. Before surgery we started the dog on optimal nutrition, a few supplements, and [i]most importantly[/i], a carefully chosen homeopathic remedy based on his individuality.

    Not only is he breathing great, but his other chronic problems (including fears and anxieties) are also resolving.

    Consult a certified veterinary homeopath ([url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/certifieds.php[/url]) for help. If you can’t find someone who is certified, then there are many AVH members who aren’t certified, but are well trained and amply qualified to handle this situation.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Yellow Lab Suffering From Laryngeal Paralysis #2605

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=KAREN]diagnosed as having Laryngeal Paralysis.

    she doesn’t believe that he would make it through surgery.

    I would appreciate any help at all.
    [/quote]

    Hi Karen-

    Do you know why your vet feels that surgery is not an option for your dog? Age alone should not be a deterrant. When laryngeal tieback surgery is performed by a Board Certified surgical specialist, even in an older dog, it can provide a new lease on life.

    There definitely are other homeopathic and holistic options, but you may want to get a surgical specialist’s opinion first. Here is a a link to find a Board Certified surgeon if you are interested in their opinion:
    [url]http://www.acvs.org/AboutTheACVS/DiplomateDirectory/[/url]

    Let me know if I can help in any other way.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Barfy Cat #2603

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=MsCatherine2525] Do you know of any in Vancouver British Columbia or how I could find one?
    [/quote]

    Dr. Peter Dobias is a well-trained colleague of mine up your way. Alternatively, go to [url]http://www.theavh.org[/url] for a full listing of homeopathic vets. You could even work with someone outside BC by telephone (in conjunction with your local vet).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Barfy Cat #2601

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=MsCatherine2525]Is there anything I can do to help her with it?[/quote]

    What is she eating? Any other problems? Do you have a homeopathic vet?

    This symptom is likely related both to the food and to the presence of a slight internal imbalance (latent psora). A homeopathic veterinarian can definitely help in both areas.

    In the meantime continue to feed smaller amounts at one time, make sure it is a meat-based, high quality food and have a vet exam including a stool examination to make sure that nothing else is going on.

    Let us know how she is doing.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Figuring out the sickness #2599

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Hanyoutai]
    Is there any way to figure out what exactly is wrong with him? Or do any of you know some other possibilities? Something I could do to help him perhaps?[/quote]

    He needs to get to your vet ASAP. These are potentially very serious symptoms which need to be evaluated [b]in person[/b] by a vet. Go to the vet ER if necessary.

    In the meantime, do not give him any food or water which will just add fuel to the fire.

    Please let us know what they find.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Figuring out the sickness #2598

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Hanyoutai]
    Is there any way to figure out what exactly is wrong with him? Or do any of you know some other possibilities? Something I could do to help him perhaps?[/quote]

    He needs to get to your vet ASAP. These are potentially very serious symptoms which need to be evaluated [b]in person[/b] by a vet. Go to the vet ER if necessary.

    In the meantime, do not give him any food or water which will just add fuel to the fire.

    Please let us know what they find.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog has skin problems, itching, bad odor #2594

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=crystallynn]Any ideas or suggestions?.[/quote]

    Many ❗

    What else are you feeding and what other supplements have you tried (omega 3 or 6 fatty acids, antioxidants, zinc or trace minerals, etc.)? Any fresh or raw food? Often these skin symptoms are related to improper diet and other deficiencies.

    Do you indeed see any fleas? Has there been a skin scraping or fecal test for internal parasites?

    Any new cleaning products, wool rugs, recently painted areas, etc.?

    This type of itchiness is often related to an internal dysequilibrium that needs to be addressed homeopathically. Personally I would advise working with a vet homeopath before you do anything else. Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org[/url] for a referral.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Eating Grass #2593

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Raina Damico]
    Is this morning ritual symptomatic of something or is it OK?[/quote]

    Hi Raina-

    Although this symptom isn’t diagnostic of anything per se, it is frequently an early warning sign that he is having some mild nausea. Of course the symptom has to be placed in context of everything else going on with Max. Perhaps he just likes nibbling on the new Spring growth of grass….?

    We will address this further when we follow-up at our next visit. Knowing his history, I bet that this is a clue as to what is happening with him energetically.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Vet visit @ 12 weeks old.. #2592

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Nan] Any reccommendation about what immunizations I should allow? [/quote]

    It really depends on the true risk of overwhelming exposure. Remember, the best way to prevent any infection is a strong immune system. Over vaccination or vaccination at too early of an age can actually increase susceptibility to disease.

    Many of my new puppy patients do not get any vaccinations except rabies as required by law. When vaccination is necessary, two vaccines, one at 10 weeks and one at 14-16 weeks is all that I give. Every situation and individual is different.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Siberian husky puppy has diarrhea #2585

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Nan]We are feeding Wellness brand puppy food and the stools are loose from pudding consistancy to liquid. What can I give to stop the diarrhea?[/quote]

    Bring a stool sample to your vet. Also try feeding rice porridge mixed with low fat cottage cheese (no more than 1/4 cup of the mixture at a time).
    That almost always helps while you get to the bottom of the problem.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: ????? Whats this bump on my cats back ????? #2584

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=brokenangel0503] I just wanted to know if it could be a serious[/quote]

    Schedule a time for your vet to examine your cat and palpate the growth. That is the best way to start.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog Refuses food for 2 weeks #2583

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=lmbrown53]can anyone think of anything [/quote]

    Have you tried grocery store canned cat/kitten foods. When my Boris stopped eating I also purchased every kind of junk food treat that I could find. He happened to like the beef jerky types.

    Good luck with your new homeopathic remedy. That should do the trick by treating the underlying problem.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: 4 month old Irsh Setteri #2582

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=samigurl]someone please help[/quote]

    Please go see your vet ASAP.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: how long can cats carry babies (new to this cat thing) #2581

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ck121013]what do i feed her to have healthy babies[/quote]

    *Not* dry food. Try to transition to wet food (much fewer unnecessary fillers and carbs) or better yet, a real meat-based diet. Please read some of my cat nutrition articles for much more info.

    A pregnant cat has an even higher protein, calorie and fat requirement, so proper nutrition is essential at this time.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: suggestion for treating elevated liver enzymes in pup #2580

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=miriam] Any suggestions (food, supplements, homeopathy, etc.) for helping to boost her immune system? Thanks[/quote]

    There’s lots that you can do to help her liver recover. It sounds like she may have had an acute toxic exposure from which she is improving.

    Aside from Thistlerex (which is the combination herbal product which I use to support liver function) it is hard to make specific treatment suggestions without knowing more specifics. In general, make sure that you are feeding an organic, meat-based diet, avoiding environmental toxins and providing plenty of fresh (distilled, bottled, etc.) water.

    The correct homeopathic remedy will definitely help her tremendously. However, it can only be chosen based on her other symptoms (not just liver enzyme elevation).

    Good luck and please let us know how she is doing.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: parvovirus threat #2573

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sthore]At what age would you recommend vaccinating if using a monovalent vaccine? [/quote]

    Actually I don’t recommend vaccinating at all. Rabies as required by law and possibly during an epidemic. In addition to no vaccinations, fresh-food feeding or symptom suppression is very important..

    The strongest immunity however is obtained without vaccinations in conjunction with constitutional, classical homeopathic treatment and proper nutrition. If treatment is started early in life, susceptibility to many diseases can be prevented (and treated once they develop).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: homeopathy for eye trouble #2572

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Jerri] Is there anything else I can do for him?
    Jerri[/quote]

    Definitely! You are probably just palliating the eye inflammation anyway. Rapid recurrence of suppressed symptoms is usually a good sign as it is seen when there is a strong vital force.

    Find a cerrtified vet homeopath and s/he will help you (even by telephone and e-mail). Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org/referral/avh_index.php[/url] for a referral.

    Good luck and please keep us informed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: A few random questions.. #2571

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=JpX]diet and herbs don’t help the little things like mild/random scratching that isn’t food related. Little things that the vet doesn’t think need looking into, but enough to annoy my dog and me.

    3. Any recomendation for toothpaste? [/quote]

    Diet, herbs, supplements, etc. will *never* get your dog (or us) to be as healthy as we can be.

    The reason is that our vitality is chiefly governed by an internal energetic balance which those things do not effect. Once you start working with a well trained veterinary homeopath you will see the “little things” go away. That’s why I call them commmon but abnormal (see [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/common.html[/url]).

    Try using a baking soda and purfied water mix for tooth brushing. As far as commercial products, CET Tartar control (not plain CET) is probably the most effective though as you point out, not all natural.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Unusual Bloat #2570

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Janet Goff]
    Have you ever seen anything like this before, or have any ideas?[/quote]

    Yes. At this stage it is a functional (vs. structural) disease which is hard to pin down diagnostically (as you have seen).

    In such a young dog homeopathy can help tremendously as long as he still has the vital energy to heal.

    I strongly recommend consulting a trained veterinary homeopathy expert.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: orthomolecular treatment #2564

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I will be brief as the board is about to move to a new format and this reply may not be saved.

    I have never heard of vit C (in any form) causing tumors (though I use it all of the time in cancer treatment).

    As a New Yorker you may want to contact Dr. Marty Goldstein at Smith Ridge (in South Salem) for more info.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Sick Kitty – IBD #2559

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Linda Rossetti]We don’t know what to do and it’s breaking our hearts. We are worried that euthanasia is the only solution. We hope not. Any advise would be appreciated.[/quote]

    Hi Linda-

    I posed a reply a few days ago but it seems to have disappeared. Ah well, the new and improved forum should be up very soon and will be more stable.

    Basically I just explained my approach to a case like Candy’s. First thing I do is adjust the diet to make sure it is optimal (no grain) and fresh-food based. Next I will wean the medications and stop those that are non-essential.

    As part of the weaning process, there are some natural supplements which I use that will help her body adjust to the removal of the drugs. The *most important* step IMHO is the addition of constitutional homeopathic prescribing. This will reduce (and hopefully eliminate) the imbalance which has led to the IBD symptoms.

    A good holistic vet can help with the first three steps but you will need an experienced vet homeopath to help find the best homeopathic remedy for Candy. Make sure that you find someone who is knowledgeable about this disease and is comfortable working with the drugs which she is taking (as they should not all just be stopped cold turkey).

    Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org[/url] for a referral.

    Also, you might find this site [url]http://www.catnutrition.org/ibd.html[/url] helpful. She doesn’t talk much about homeopathy as her cat was basically cured by the diet upgrade.

    Good luck and please keep us posted.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: old dog new problems #2558

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Sheila]wondering if there is anything I can add to his diet that will help him have better bowel control?[/quote]

    I congratulate you on that tremedous weight loss! Remember though, Buddy was not fat from eating human (aka real) food but rather due to an excess of calories and insufficient exercise (and probably too many carbohydrates). Almost all of my patients eat human quality food and very few of them are fat.

    Has Buddy had a recent vet exam and blood/urine testing? If not, please bring him in for one as soon as you are able. At his age this symptom could be the start of something more serious.

    Post the results when you get them and we can talk further.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: My pet cat is constantly scratching behind ears/neck area. #2557

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=TB38128] could someone please give me othe possibilities of my pet’s condition![/quote]

    If you have looked around this board and my site, you know that there are lots of other treatment options. If any of them interest you (and many of the holistic treatments could help your cat) I suggest that you contact a holistic vet.

    Use the AHVMA online referral link in my info center or better yet, get a word of mouth referral.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Eye trouble #2553

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Jerri]Any information would be so appreciated.[/quote]

    Euphrasia is a great choice for many acute eye problems. It frequently does not reach to the root of the problem in chronic situations however. To find the best remedies to use to eliminate the problems once and for all you will likely need to look at the *overall* clinical situation.

    For example, the recent symptom of eating paper is likely a clue given by his body about which group of remedies would be useful, i.e. those that crave indigestibles. You also imply other problems/symptoms. They will also need to be considered when taking a complete case (which is what will need to be done to help the most).

    I’d love to continue the discussion about the homeopathic method but weshould have it in my homeopathy folder.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Seizures #2552

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Raymond Coyer]Can anything be done to ease the seizures due to a brain tumor?[/quote]

    Definitely, though I wonder whether a brain tumor is truly to blame here. Any confirmatory diagnostic imaging? What about exam/consultation by a neurology specialist?

    Regardless, fresh food feeding, specific vitamins (B-12, E, etc.) and supplements (like dimethylyglycine) have been proven to help a lot. In my practice I would also start constitutional homeopathic prescribing to help reduce the underlying imbalance.

    Good luck, and please keep us informed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Incontinence aftrer bladder surgery #2549

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Catman]Could something have affected sphincter muscle control during surgery? [/quote]

    Hi Catman-

    It is extremely unlikely that the surgical procedure caused the incontinence.

    A “normal”, adult cat only gets repeatedly dehydrated due to blood loss, vomiting, fluid shifts or kidney failure. Do you know why he is still getting dehydrated post-surgically?

    I would continue with the fluid support. Of course, excellent nutrition is very important. The more fresh food with extra water, the better. No dry food of course.

    In addiition, deep homeopathic curative therapy, Amino B+, +/-K liquid vitamins (from Rx Vitamins), Nu-Cat vitamins, Trace Animinerals and omega-3 fatty acids are all very important to facilitate a full recovery.

    Good luck and please let me know what happens.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: dog peeing and desexing #2544

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=jennie]I feel that if he was de-sexed, his behaviour may change for the better. Any ideas on this dilemma [/quote]

    It certainly is possible that neutering will help though as the other poster noted it may not help at all (that would be unusual).

    Regarding dominance, you can start playing “Nothing in Life is Free” and that will definitely help any dominance issues.
    [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/documents/nilif.pdf[/url]

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cat that has licked fur off his stomach #2543

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sousea]Could he be allergic to the raw food? .[/quote]

    Food allergy (to any ingredient) is always possible. I suggest that you contact a veterinary homeopath (go to [url]http://www.theavh.org[/url]) for management of the internal imbalance which is leading to this symptom.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Distemper vaccine and cancer? #2542

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=bestdogsx4]Would you have any knowledge of this?.[/quote]

    Although the asociation of vaccines and cancer (and immune dysfunction in general) is well known, I am not aware of any specific work on the distemper vaccine-synovial sarcoma association.

    Sorry.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Synovi sarcoma #2540

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=bestdogsx4]Sadly we lost him on Feb. 6,[/quote]

    I’m so sorry for your loss. It is wonderful though that he lived so much longer than the expectations.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Pom urinary problem #2539

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Stbern1]Does this sound like a urinary tract infection? If so, are there any remedies I can do at home. [/quote]

    It does sound like her urinary tract is inflamed (not necessarily an “infection”). Although this may be very treatable without drugs, I strongly advise you to work with a vet in resolving these symptoms.

    Personally I treat “UTIs” with homeopathy, diet modification, purified cranberry extract (Cranberry NS), vitamin C, etc. but you need to talk to your vet about this.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: my 9 year old shepherd is showing signs of dysplasia #2538

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=rshepherd]my shepherd is showing signs of dysplasia. the vet prescribed metacam. i would like to put her on something other than a steroid? What are some other alternatives?[/quote]

    There are many alternatives for management of joint problems in dogs. Antioxidants (like Nu-Pet wafers and Antiox), glucosamine sulfate, Nutriflex, etc. are all very effective as are omega-3 fatty acids, trace minerals, etc.

    If you want to minimize drugs I suggest that you contact a holistic or homeopathically trained veterinarian.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-Metacam isn’t a steroid it’s a NSAID (same category as Viox or Rimadyl).

    in reply to: Homeopathy for hyperthyroid cats #2537

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=asho] is the success rate using homeopathic treatment for this condition?[/quote]

    Homeopathic prognosis really varies for each individual. In general, hypertyroidism (which is usually due to a benign tumor on the thyroid gland) is emminently treatable with homeopathy.

    I am more concerned about the loud murmur which may indicate hyperthyroid-associated cardiomyopathy.

    Regardless of what you decide (conventional or homeopathic) I advise some treatment in the near future.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: new puppy has diarrhea #2536

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ashlyburmeister] The issue at hand is diarrhea and/or loose stool and seems to have frequent bowel movements. This was happening before the food switch and is continuing to happen still. Could it be a reaction/allergy to the food,[/quote]

    Congratulations on mom’s new pup! An allergic food reaction would be very unlikely at this age especially since the diarrhea was already manifesting before the diet switch.

    Has mom tried feeding fresh food in lieu of commercial dog food? If so, does the stool improve? Many dogs that develop stool problems while on commercial (*especially* dry) food will improve when on fresh food, e.g. white meat chicken and rice/oatmeal.

    The answer is a fresh food diet and homeopathic treatment to allow the pup to tolerate any food (as all dogs should be able to eat a varied diet without overt diarrhea).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Diet for male cat w/hx of struvites #2519

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=obsidiancat]is there a list anywhere on what foods I can give him that will acidify his urine, [/quote]

    I agree!! Eating the same food over aand over is boring and not healthy. In my opinion the best way to prevent stone formation is a combination of homeopathic treatment, fresh, home-prepared diet and appropriate supplementation.

    For home-cooked diet recipes I recommend both Dr. Pitcairn and Dr. Strombeck’s excellent books. In my practice, most of my clients don’t use any specific recipe and tend to avoid most of the grains which are in them (meat-based diets are more species-appropriate and more acidifying for the urine).

    Read some of my diet articles for more info. Also look at
    [url]http://www.felinefuture.com/nutrition/[/url] for some great tips. I’d also advise seeking out a veterinary homeopath to help address the internal issues which predisposed to the stones in the first place.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Help my Dravyn!!! #2517

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=dravynsmama]At 17 lbs a month ago…he got down to 11 lbs prior to finding out he had worms and coccedea.
    I treat monthly with Frontline Plus, and he gets a steroid shot every 3 to 4 months. The problem is that he is down to 10.5 lbs now.
    if there is something that I should be feeding him that will help him maintain his ideal 12/13 lbs][/quote]

    First of all, that’s a *huge* weight loss (30% in 1 month?). Second, you may want to look at lifestyle issues causing many/all of the problems. What do you feed? Are they on an adequate species-appropriate diet and not dry cat food? Do you have so many fleas that monthly Frontline, even in the winter, is necessary?

    I also think you should reevaluate the frequent steroid injections. It is better to identify and treat the underlying disease resulting in the dermatitis rather than just suppress the symptoms with powerful antiinflammatories when the symptoms flare-up

    So start witth a diet upgrade and talk to your vet about holistically evaluating the weight loss issue.

    Good luck and please let me know if I can help further.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Do I have to give antibiotics after oral surgery? #2506

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=OneStepCloser]I finally had my dog’s tooth extracted and They sent him home with antibiotics and I can’t decide if I should use these[/quote]

    I apologize for the delay in getting back to you, but the board has been down for a few days.

    There is good rationale for use of antibiotics *immediately* after dentistry or especially after dental surgery or tooth extraction. The mouth is full of potentialy harmful baceria. Intact tissues in the mouth as well as strong local and systemic immunity help maintain equilibrium. When the mouth-blood barrier is breached (such as with the bleeding present in dental surgery) bacteria can enter the blood stream. Antibiotics are given prophylactically,

    Of course, there are no studies that show that this practice is warranted clinically, and I almost never reccommend it (perhaps I would in an immune-compromised individual).

    When a patient is responding well to a carefully chosen homeopathic remedy, is eating a species-appropriate diet and is not getting overvaccinated or suppressed the “terrain” of the body is optimized. These individuals rarely get secondary infections of any sort.

    Bottom line in this situation (whether to use “prophylactic” antibiotics) is that you should educate yourself about the options, and then talk to your vet about this topic (and others like diet, suppressing symptoms, vaccination, etc.). It is very important that the two of you are on the same wavelength so that you can help your dog get the best health care possible.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: back legs #2503

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=ddt2278]my dog’s right rear knee pops out of socket, He also has very dry[/quote]

    These are both symptoms of a chronic internal imbalance. I would strongly advise addressing the totality of your dog’s symptoms with homeopathy, nutrition and appropriate supplementation. Glucosamine sulfate, omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants (like Nu-Pet wafers) may be useful along with upgrading the diet. Talk to a homeopathically-trained and experienced vet for more help. See [url]http://www.theavh.org/refcover.htm[/url] for a referral.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Diet for male cat w/hx of struvites #2502

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=bigcaat]We are currently feeding him Innova,

    We are considering a raw diet made with ‘Feline Instincts.” Is this a good idea? And in the meantime, until we can get that started, what do we feed him? Do we keep him on the Innova? Do we switch him to California Naturas, Do we switch him to Innova Evo canned, which my pet store will be getting in two days?
    [/quote]

    Congratulations on your new kitty and for being proactive about dietary therapy.

    Innova wet or dry?

    A switch to Feline Instincts or any fresh food is a GREAT move.

    Make sure that you are using a variety of high quality wet foods mixed with chicken broth or water to try and minimize further crystal formation. Cranberry extract and vitamin C can help as well with resultant UTIs.

    There is minimal diffference btweeen the brands you mentioned (same manufacturer). What about Wellness, Petguard or Precise Plus canned foods?

    Evo canned is also great though has more fat and calories so be careful about watching his weight.

    Remember, the keys in good diet are freshness and **variety**. See my short article at [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/diet.html[/url] for more info and browse my other diet articles for futrther help.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hystiocytoma #2499

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tjh193]Can you advise what these remedies might be?[/quote]

    Sure!!

    Homeopathic medicines are chosen according to the totality of symptoms (like skin or intestinal problems and not just the tumors) of the individual. Homeopaths see the internal pattern of disturbance through the external signs and symptoms.

    When your dog’s internal balance is optimized, local lesions (like growths) will resolve along with any other sign of imbalance (see [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/common.html[/url] for other examples of early imbalance).

    A veterinary homeopath will choose among the many homeopathic medicines (remedies) available to help your dog gently and without side effects or surgery.

    Talk to your vet and/or research homeopathic treatment on your own. Read some of my links. Go to [url]http://www.theavh.org/refcover.htm[/url] for a referral.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hystiocytoma #2494

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=dj1869]My 11mo old boxer boy has a hystiocytoma on the top of his left front paw. Any helpful suggestions on which path we should take[/quote]

    From my (the homeopathic and holistic) perspective, removal of this growth will be suppressive to his vital force and predispose to future tumors. From a traditional (reductionistic) point of view however, I agree with your local vet.

    Histiocytomas will typically resolve spontaneously within this period of time, especially in young and healthy dogs. Since it has not, I would recommend helping him deal with this problem internally (and naturally) with well-chosen homeopathic remedies.

    Good luck and please let us know what happens.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Back leg spasms #2492

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Linda]My dog has back leg spasms,is there anything natural I can give him ? Could the potassium level be low ?[/quote]

    Without a lot more info, e.g. age, breed, diet, medical history, etc. it’s impossible to say. How are the “spasms” manifesting? Some breeds, e.g Scotties, have an inherited form of muscle cramping.

    That being said, this symptom may be a sign of an early functional disturbance of a structural muscle pathology, e.g. myositis. Only an exam by your vet and appropriate diagnostics can differentiate. In true muscle cramping the CPK enzyme (which is released from the muscles) will be quite elevated.

    For empiric therapy I would make sure that you are feeding an optimal, fresh food, meat-based diet. Use antioxidants like Nu-Pet wafers and Antiox, trace minerals with extra magnesium and potassium (which may be in a multivitamin or can be supplied in fresh foods).

    Good luck and please keep us informed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: mammary tumors #2490

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=liz]would you recommend spaying a female? [/quote]

    Depends on the situation. In general spaying young females makes them better household pets. The conventional wisdom is that early spaying is protective for mammary cancer but recent studies are showing that spaying and neutering may actually increase the overall cancer risk. Thus, as in many medical situations, the waters are further muddied.

    The only reason I would say do NOT neuter is if a pet is manifesting some symptom via its’ reproductive tract, e.g. recurrent false pregnancies in a female dog. In this case spaying would be suppressive to the life force and therefore contraindicated. Once the symptom was homeopathically resolved the spaying could be safely performed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Treating malassezia homeopathically and naturally #2488

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=pdiamond]What kind of foods help? What kind of topical treatments and homeopathic remedies work against this yeast/fungus?[/quote]

    First of all it’s extremely important to realize that this organism (like many others) is secondary, and is not the cause of the problem. By strengthening the epithelial defense systems the organism is unable to survive. Yeast and bacteria are normally present in every individual without causing clinical disease. Even Pasteur (albeit on his death bed) said that “the microbe is nothing and terrain is everything”.

    When I see a pet with this problem, the first thing I do is to make sure that s/he is eating a species-appropriate diet. Then depending on the history I may reccomend some supplements and immune boosters (e.g. omega-3 fatty acids, multivitamins with additional vitamin C, antioxidants, Immunotone/Immu-GO, etc.). If there are more serious problems then a well-chosen homeopathic remedy is *essential* to aid in full recovery and to prevent relapse.

    Because this is a deep-seated, often chronic problem, the remedy will need to be chosen by a professional homeopath. Diet change and supplements alone however may resolve the problem.

    Good luck and let me know if I can help further.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: My poor (sick?) chihuahua #2487

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=5chisandagurl] is there a natural alternative for the treatment of my chihuahua,[/quote]

    There definitely is a natural treatment. It entails diet upgrade (no kibble) and other holistic and homeopathic treatment. Although you can learn a lot about how to do this at this site and through other sources, you may want to consult a holistic (preferably homeopathically-trained) vet for more help.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy #2484

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=heartbroken]
    Can you tell me more about this disease?

    I have another 5 month old kitten that is from the same mom. Is this usually genetic? Does my new kitten have a good chance at having the same thing? [/quote]

    I’m so sorry for your loss. Take a look at my article on HCM to learn more:
    [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/felcardi.html[/url]

    There may indeed be a genetic component to this disease but I think it is *very* unlikely that your kitten has cardiomyopathy. A screening echocardiogram may be worthwhile to ease your anxiety.

    The best way to guard against this disease once you find that it is not present n your kitten is a good, fresh meat-based diet and multivitamins including taurine. Constitutional homeopathic care will help reduce the chances of acquiring this (and many other) disease later in life.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: My poor (sick?) chihuahua #2483

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=5chisandagurl]He squats and pushes and nothing comes out but the faint sound of air. After rubbing his bum on the carpet he’ll try again and then a bit of this jelly, mucous-y looking stuff comes out ![/quote]

    Clinically this sounds like a “colitis” (which is merely a descriptive term for the symptom complex and is not an actual diagnosis). What do you feed? Low quality processed commercial food is often implicated.

    These symptoms are very common and I see them in my patients all of the time (occasionally even in those eating a fresh food diet). Homeopathic treatment and correct diet should resolve the underlying process quickly at this point. The longer you wait and the more you palliate the symptoms, the harder true resolution will be and recurrent problems may result.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Itchy ears and skin #2482

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=martha5601]What can we do to keep them from itching and scratching. Their ears are very red and both are losing hair [/quote]

    Are you working with a homeopathic or holistic vet? If so, you must realize that the itchy ears are a manifestation of a systemic internal imbalance. Proper diet (fresh food, meat-based), certain supplements (like omega-3 and other fatty acids, grape seed extract, etc.) and constitutional homeopathy will correct the inflammatory reaction which is leading to the itchy ears.

    BTW-homeopathic remedies are chosen based on the totality of the individual so there is no single remedy for any symptom, e.g. itchy ears and/or skin

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Panting Cat #2474

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=rock998]My cat pants like a dog after about 20 minutes of play. Is this normal?[/quote]

    Common, but not normal (see [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/common.html[/url] ).

    Is your cat overweight? Any coughing? How old is s/he? When was the last vet exam, and what were the findings?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: mammary tumors #2473

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=liz]what has been your experience treating dogs w/ mammary tumors?

    i would assume resection of any type of tumor would be suppressive to the life force?

    what are your general recommendations for females w/ mammary tumors? [/quote]

    Hi Liz-

    My experience with canine mammary tumors is that most of them either resolve or stop growing once homeopathic treatment is instituted IF the Vital Force is strong enough (and well-indicated remedies are used).

    Yes. Resection of any type of tumor (or *local* treatment of any type of lesion) is suppressive (by definition). Any time that the underlying energetic imbalance is not treated in lieu of treating one specific symptom, the result is suppression (assuming that the symptom resolves).

    My approach to most tumors is to take a complete case and start treatment with the best-indicated remedy based on the presenting symptoms, history, and constitution of the individual.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: ear infection and my lab #2467

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=buddhababy97]does any one have any suggestions on how i can deal with this very stubborn infection![/quote]

    Ears are tough!! That’s for sure. It’s important to start looking at these recurrent ear “infections” as what they truly are. That is, an internal (not just ear) imbalance which has made the ear susceptible to bacterial and yeast *secondary* infections.

    Most commonly these have an allergic basis. Processed, grain-based diet is almost always part of the problem.

    Try upgrading the diet, stay away from gluten (wheat, barley, rye and bran)add fatty acids including omega-3s and use TrizEDTA or Zymox for ear cleansing. Stop trying to suppress the problem (e.g. with antibiotics or steroids) as this may help temporarily but will certainly cause other problems.

    I also strongly advise working with a homeopathically trained vet who will treat the underlying problem. This will both help the ear issues as well as prevent more serious problems later on in life.

    Good luck with this difficult problem.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Not sure what’s wrong with Cat #2463

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Silver]but actually wants to hear owner and cat out, I’d REALLY appreciate it![/quote]

    I agree that this is probably a functional (rather than structural problem) and that workup may very well be fruitless. That being said, as a diagnostically-minded vet (my early training was in veterinary internal medicine and endocrinology) I always like to have as much data as possible before making specific recommendations.

    In your case some baseline workup would be nice. Whether or not you go for it though, you need to consult a homeopathically trained veterinarian. After a long (1-2 hour) interview process the veterinary homeopath will advise you about the use of individualized homeopathic remedies, lifestyle modifications and how to upgrade your cat’s diet. I know that most of your cat’s symptoms will improve and/or resolve.

    In the meantime, you can use Rescue Remedy when you leave and return home to help with any kitty anxiety. You also need to schedule at least one hour of play daily, preferably as a reward for when you return home (before feeding). Read this info for tips on playing with your cat
    [url]http://www.ddfl.org/behavior/catplay.pdf[/url].

    Good luck and let me know if you need help finding a veterinary homeopath.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Whole Foods #2461

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=BethCA66]Can full-grown cats eat small fish with bones such as fresh sardines and smelt?[/quote]

    Yup!

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Heal “Chronic Bronchitis” with homepathy? #2460

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=OneStepCloser]I was wondering if you have any experience with “Chronic Bronchitis”?
    almost every morning he wakes up with a hack and running around outside causes him to hack.

    I just refuse to believe that it can’t be fixed. [/quote]

    Good morning. I applaud your perseverance in trying to achieve optimal health for your dog.

    It sounds like you have a very good handle on the etiology of the situation (early infection—>mild lung damage—->”chronic bronchitis”). His diet and exercise improvement have strengthened his body and thereby helped him deal with the problem.

    There are many situations like this however (low grade persistent symptoms) which the body is just not able to resolve without help. Fortunately, homeopathic stimulation of the healing process can be *very* successful in resolving this type of chronic problem.

    I strongly urge you to seek out one of the Certified Veterinary Homeopaths in the New England area for appropriate treatment.

    Feel free to post other general questions or comments. Please-mail me privately with any specific ways that I can help.

    Good luck. I’m sure that 2006 will be the year when you finally find the answers you’ve been seeking for the past 3 years.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: FLUTD getting well and maintenance #2459

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Dominique]He has been eating the dry food since he came back from the vet[/quote]

    Thanks so much for sharing your experience Dominique. I am realy glad that your cat is doing better.

    In my opinion however, as well as that of every veterinary university researcher that I know, dry food is not the best way to feed any cat who is predisposed to FLUTD. Please read the articles on this topic in my pet care library.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Dog having trouble pee/pooping #2458

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=DevnMc]Yesterday she had the runs and threw up (once) a considerable amount. This morning she is having difficulty peeing and pooping. She tries to but can’t. She is dispositionally the same.[/quote]

    Since she is feeling fine in all other ways, you can start just by fasting for 24 hours. This will help eliminate any gastrointestinal irritants and toxins.

    As this happened two days ago I would imagine that by now she is feeling much better. If that is not the case I recommend at least having her examined by your vet before Christmas to rule out physical abnormalities (they will check her hydration, temp, heart, abdomen, etc.).

    Please let us know what’s going on and have a great Christmas weekend.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: are vaccines harmful? #2452

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Janeinwestport]Is it a Connecticut state law that they HAVE to have them, or not? [/quote]

    Hi Jane-

    Unfortunately it is state law. What you choose to do however…

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Burns Nutrition #2451

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Zahra]Has anyone had experience with Burns Nutrition dog food products?[/quote]

    Nope, never heard of it. A quick peak at the site was underwhelming (to say the least). Some of the products are mainly grain which is a fundamental problem.

    Stick with meat-based foods and stay away from dry food if possible.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Spayed Incision not healing #2450

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=mcclure]Do you have any suggestions?[/quote]

    I hate to sound like a broken record and give you the same advice as I just gave Tarja, but… Aggressive hot compressing will stimulate blood flow to the area and promote healing.

    Homeopathic remedies will stimulate the body to deal with this delayed effect from the sutures (assuming that’s what this is) appropriately.

    Topical Aloe vera massaged into any red, inflamed areas will help as well.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Cut above left eye #2449

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=oesrule]can it heal on it’s own if it doesn’t get infected?
    [/quote]

    In my practice I rarely find the need to use antibiotics for wounds (or much of anything for that matter). Topical cleansing (I like peroxide for this purpose) and aggressive *hot* compressing is usually sufficient.

    Of course a well chosen homeopathic remedy will also speed the process and help the immune system deal with any secondary infection.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: “Poopsicles” #2442

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=oesrule]I Is this bad for her system? Can it cause any problems?
    [/quote]

    Hi Tarja-

    In general, poopsicle eating may be disgusting (to us) but usually is not harmful (wolves frequently eat droppings of other animals and their own stool).

    This symptom (coprophagia) can sometimes just be due to a personal preference. Physiologically this is occasionally related to intestinal parasites (especially in puppies) or ravenous appetite (e.g. in improper diet or with Diabetes).

    In my experience, stool-eating is most commonly associated with inappropriate diet (especially kibbles of all kinds) and mild internal (energetic) imbalances.

    I find that species-appropriate diet and correctly used homeopathic remedies almost always stop stool eating (and scooting, and allergies, and…).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Blocked Tear Duct in Yellow Lab #2436

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=pruffles]Have you heard of this procedure and would homeopathy help?[/quote]

    There are a few ways to approach the dog with excess tearing and/or tear staining (commonly seen in smaller and white dogs and cats).

    My first question is always whether this is an excess production of tears (frequently due to mild inflammation of the eyes) or whether a normal tear quantity is just not draining properly through the tear ducts.

    A simple dye test can usually help differentiate. A few drops of Fluoroscein dye (which is more commonly used to diagnose ulcerrs in the eye) is instilled in the eyes. Under normal circumstannces it will drain out the nostrils via the tear ducts in a few minutes. If the dye doesn’t drain then the ducts may be blocked.

    Flushing the tear ducts under sedation may open them back up. Occasionally the ducts never properly formed or are blocked so badly that only a surgical procedure will help.

    In my experience, especially in medium-large breed dogs, the more common scenario is a low grade inflammation of the eyes causing increased tear production (or other aberrant discharge).

    As a veterinary homeopathy I view excess discharges ( of any kind) as a sign that there is a subtle internal imbalance. Read about these common (but abnormal) warning signs at [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/common.html[/url] This problem is best addressed internally with homeopathic prescribing as described elsewhere on my site.

    Other supportive measures include species-appropriate diet (including avoidance of gluten), fatty acids (especially omega-3s) and other antioxidants.

    Your vet will help guide you in the direction whichs/he feels will be most helpful.

    Good luck, and please let us know what happens.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Hip Dysplasia #2434

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=oesrule]
    What are your thougths on Rimadyl?

    Is there one over-the-counter medicine that’s better than the next?

    I have heard so many bad stories about this medicine. Are they true[/quote]

    Hi Tarja-

    Regarding Rimadyl (or Deramax or…). It definitely can be toxic. Deaths associated with it have been reported. That being said, I know dogs who have been on it for years and are doing OK. Personally I would only use it in an end-stage situation. If modifying the diet (no grains), homeopathy and *appropriate* supplementation isn’t helping, then drugs are better than the alternative (lousy quality of life or euthanasia).

    The best tolerated OTC NSAID is Ascriptin (aspirin + Maalox).

    As I mentioned before, some (though not all) of the horror stories are true. Any drug can cause serious toxicity. That’s one of the reasons I love Homeopathy (which is always non-toxic since the remedies are ultradiluted).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: cat with liver not working #2432

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Birgit] Cat has been on feeding tube for two weeks

    Does anybody have any ideas what can be done[/quote]

    Good morning Birgit and welcome to the forum-

    In my experience two weeeks with a feeding tube is often enough time for a cat with fattty liver (from not eating) to start improving.

    Is s/he being cared for at a critical care facility or is the care being overseen by a Board Certified internist?

    Supportively there is a lot that can be done from a more holistic perspective (homeopathy, herbs/supplements, etc.). A lot depends on who is caring for the cat and how far you want to go to help.

    The best way to help further is to find a holistic and nutritionally-trained vet in your area. If you are unable to find someone, feel free to PM me with more case details if you would like more help.

    Good luck, please let us know what transpires.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Advice about the Canine Flu? #2430

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    22 November 2005
    Emerging canine influenza

    An emerging canine respiratory tract disease, known as canine influenza or canine flu, was found in dogs in shelters, boarding facilities, and veterinary clinics in several areas of Florida, including the southwest counties of Broward, Miami-Dade, and Palm Beach, and in the northeast county of Duval. Cases have also been confirmed in New York and in a dog that resided in Massachusetts. The disease caused by the highly contagious virus can mimic signs of kennel cough. All dogs, regardless of breed or age, are susceptible to infection and do not have naturally acquired or vaccine-induced immunity, according to the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine. The virus can spread by aerosolized respiratory secretions, contaminated inanimate objects, and by people moving between infected and uninfected dogs.

    While most dogs that become infected experience a mild form of influenza, some develop a more acute disease with clinical signs of pneumonia. Among the latter group, the fatality rate is 1 percent to 5 percent, the University of Florida reported. “… Despite the rumors that are out on the Internet and other such sources, this disease is not as deadly as people want to make it,” said Dr. Cynda Crawford, a veterinary immunologist at the University of Florida. “Only a minority of dogs, a small number of dogs, experience complications such as pneumonia.” Dr. Crawford was among the group of researchers who identified the virus. The group included staff from the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine. A full report on the group’s findings, titled “Transmission of equine influenza virus to dogs,” was posted online in the Sept. 26 issue of Science Express Reports, a part of Science magazine.

    In April 2004, a group of researchers at the University of Florida reported that preliminary findings suggested equine influenza virus had jumped the species barrier to dogs and caused a respiratory tract disease outbreak, killing eight Greyhounds in January 2004 at a track in Jacksonville, Fla. At the time, the researchers said there was no evidence to suggest the findings extended beyond the particular group of dogs or that it posed a substantial threat to people or their pets. “… Initially the virus was identified in Greyhounds, and there was some speculation that the virus was exclusively causing disease in Greyhounds,” said Dr. Ruben O. Donis, chief of molecular genetics for the influenza branch at the CDC, who was part of the group of researchers.

    The group later determined in April to May 2005 that the virus also infected pet dogs when they isolated it from samples sent for diagnostic testing by shelters, boarding facilities, and veterinary clinics, Dr. Crawford said. “I also want to emphasize that we don’t have all the answers to the questions just yet, and we are working diligently on defining this disease syndrome in the dog population, so we have a few numbers to work with, and we are accumulating more data very rapidly on a daily basis,” Dr. Crawford said. She also noted that a vaccine for the disease has been in the works for the past few months.

    Meanwhile, veterinarians should take precautions when they are told that a client has made an appointment for a dog to be seen because it’s coughing. “They may want to not have that dog come in through the waiting room and mix with everyone else’s dogs,” Dr. Crawford said. To help researchers better define the clinical signs and risk factors associated with virus infection, veterinarians are encouraged to submit serum samples for canine influenza antibody tests to the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University. The samples will also help improve surveillance of the virus in the United States and Canada. For information on sample collecting and shipping, log on to Cornell’s Web site at [url]www.diaglab.vet.cornell.edu[/url], click on “Emerging Issues,” then click on “Canine Influenza Virus.”

    JAVMA
    November 22, 2005

    in reply to: Treatment for Cat with Kidney Insufficiency #2429

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Teri]
    What would you recommend?[/quote]

    Without knowing your cat’s full case it is impossible to specifically say. In general I have my clients feed high quality protein (such as in fresh food and not commercial, processed foods) at every stage of life. This usually includes renal insufficiency.

    The recent studies on protein restriction differe considerably from what I was taught in vet school over 20 years ago. Renal failure cats usually die from malnutrition rather than protein excess.

    Dr. Jeff

    BTW-I think you are confusing holistic with homeopathic. Herbal therapy is NOT homeopathy.

    in reply to: Feline Infectious Peritonitis #2428

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=BethCA66] I mentioned marasmus to our vet, and he thinks he’s not emaciated enough, .[/quote]

    Then if he really does have fluid in his belly, a Corona virus PCR on the fluid would be as close to definitive as you can get (without biopsy).

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: the best food to feed #2424

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=BethCA66]Why is dry food so bad for them?) .[/quote]

    Read the articles on this topic in my info center for more info.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Mites. #2423

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I wish I could help. Anyone out there have any useful experience with this problem?

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Feline Infectious Peritonitis #2420

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=BethCA66]What did you do to make your cat happy and comfortable? Will Neji suffer?[/quote]

    First of all Beth, I applaud you for helping these stray cats. Neji has probably never been so loved and happy.

    Why does your vet suspect FIP? Does Neji have high Corona virus titers and elevated blood globulins? Are there granulomas on his retinas? Is there fluid in his belly?

    Emaciation along with a big belly is typical of malnourishment (it’s called marasmus) and not necessarily FIP.

    If he does “have” FIP and is assymptomatic then he could live with it for a long time. Once he becomes symptomatic he could succumb within days.

    Your best bet is to start holistic care immediately. This will help him in many ways including easing his transition when that time comes. Ideally, work with an experienced vet homeopath (in addition to optimizing his diet, giving appropriate supplements and staying away from vaccines/drugs).

    Good luck. Please keep us informed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: the best food to feed #2419

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=BethCA66]Wysong Archetype food — is it for both cats and dogs
    [/quote]

    Yup. Any good food can be used for both species.

    There really is no specific fresh food to use for your cats. Any beef, poultry, fish, pork, eggs, cheese etc. *in variety* is great. Of course organic is even better, Basically they should be eating anything healthy that we eat.

    Michelle Bernard’s excellent book on the subject (see the excerpt in my library) is a great resource. You can also find a great variety of fresh meats at [url]http://www.hare-today.com[/url].

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Itchy Dog #2413

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=jr365] i’m wondering if there is something i could add to his food to help him if it is dry skin he’s suffering from.[/quote]

    Congratulations on getting rid of the fleas!! That can be a *huge* project in and of itself. I also heartily applaud you for upgrading to a species-appropriate diet (for those who don’t know, Bravo is a human grade, grain-free meat/bone/veggie food).

    In situations like this (where the fleas triggered an itchy skin response) I advise adding mixed fatty acids (like EFA-Z+ https://www.homevet.com/cgi-bin/perlshop/perlshop.cgi?ACTION=ENTER&thispage=page1.html&ORDER_ID=!ORDERID!#efaz )
    augmented with omega-3’s, grape seed extract (Antiox), +/- MSM and trace minerals as needed. Vitamins C and E as well as quercetin and bromelain can also be very useful. I use the Respirall product that contains a blend of all of these.

    In addition, use HyLyt spray for topical moisturizing along with daily brushing.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: My dog has a reall bad hip #2412

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tracey Brown] is anyhting that I can give him from home to help him out fro the athritis,[/quote]

    There are many ways to slow the progression of arthritis in animals/people with bad joints. Since you are posting your message in the Homepathy folder, why don’t we start there.

    Degenerative arthritis is just one expression of the body’s chronic imbalance. It is well known by vets that many dogs with x-ray findings of hip dysplasia (“bad hips”) do NOT have any secondary arthritis or lameness. On the other hand, there are some dogs who have severe hip problems yet only minor x-ray abnormalities of the hips.

    How can that be? The answer lies in the way that the body deals with the structural abnornmality. I have worked with many dogs that come to me barely able to stand due to bad hips who now walk (and play) normally thanks to homeopathic remedies (and no drugs or surgery).

    Unfortunately this is not the kind of thing you can do at home and will need the help of a qualified veterinary homeopath. Go to the AVH site for a referral: [url]http://www.theavh.org/refcover.htm[/url] Look especially for specialists in homeopathy (usually Certified vets or those of us who practice primarily homeopathy).

    The next thing you can do is to upgrade your dog’s nutritional status. Do not use dry dog food and stay away from grains and fillers. Fresh food feeding is by far the best way to feed. Reed Dr. Lonsdale’s excellent new book for many suggestions [url]http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0975717405/qid=1132143324/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-9203762-0713660?v=glance&s=books[/url]

    Lastly, there are many supplements that can help the body slow down and deal with the development of arthritis. Antioxidants (see Nu-Pet wafers in my supplement area), glucosamine *sulfate*, omega-3 fatty acids, trace minerals (especially manganese), Antiox (grape seed extract), etc. Feel free to PM me and I can help you with this further or start working locally with a holistic vet.

    So you see, there really is a lot that you can do to help with this problem.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: High triglycerides, alkaline urine – what to do? #2408

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Suzana]
    What can I do?[/quote]

    Good morning Suzana-

    Welcome to the forum!

    Your overeating, weight-gaining Lab may not need a “prescription” diet or drugs for his biochemical and urine abnormalities.

    If you are feeding dry food, that’s the first thing you need to stop. The fillers and carbs in dry foods do not promote optimal health, add to weight gain and are, IMHO , an inappropriate food for any breed predisposed to bloat (as Labs are).

    Next, it sounds like your dog has free run of the neighborhood? If that is indeed the case, that will also need to be strictly curtailed. There is no other way to keep him from getting into your neighbor’s garbage (aka special treats).

    Start him on an omega-3 supplement (I use the Now fish oil capsules). This will increase his metabolism and help drive down the elevated triglycerides.

    I also advise having his thyroid checked as the rapid weight gain and elevated fat in the serum can result from hypothyroidism.

    Good luck and please keep us informed.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Little Maltese puppy: head injury #2406

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=eve]Can I discontinue this? [/quote]

    I agree that it would be best not to use pred chronically. HOWEVER, your vet has examined the dog and you should follow his advice in this acute situation.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Time Sensitive Reply Needed!! #2397

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=MrsDMD]What can I do?[/quote]

    I’m so sorry to hear about your losses.

    Unfortunately I do not have enough info about your dog, e.g. diet, previous history, etc. to make specific treatment recommendations.

    In general, if you are feeding a good, varied fresh-food diet, staying away from drugs and other toxins, and promoting a healthy lifestyle otherwise (e.g. what does she do all day?) there may be a mechanical problem which only a full workup can diagnose (x-rays, bloodwork, upper GI study +/- endoscopy).

    For more help feel free to send me a private mail through this board before you leave.
    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: seizures #2393

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=tillyd200]is there a natural way to deal with the seizures instead of the meds?[/quote]

    There definitely are ways of naturally and holistically dealing with seizures. Actually, there are ways to work with just about every medical problem (cat, dog, human, etc.) without medications (at least at an early stage).

    The first step is to find a holistic, preferably homeopathically trained, vet. He or she will initially examine the lifestyle, diet, and medications of your cat. There may be an etiology or other energetic imbalance that needs to be corrected.

    In my practice, the next step is to correct the diet and add useful, seizure-threshold lowering supplements and vitamins like dimethylglycine, carnitine and vitamin E. Finally, a well-indicated homeopathic remedy will be administered.

    The remedy should then stimulate the life force of the individual sufficiently to allow it to manifest helpful symptoms which will guide to other useful homeopathic remedies (if needed).

    I’ll be happy to guide you further if you want to post more details.

    Good luck.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: Holistically treating tonsilitis #2387

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=vcabbyw]

    Just curious if anyone has dealt with this and what are some natural ways I can give to help boost her immune system to fight this off?[/quote]

    Hi April-

    Sounds like you have a perfect situation for a phone consult with a homeopathic vet. Many of us will work via telephone as consultants to help boost her life force and thereby her immune system.

    This is a *very* successful way of managing problems of this sort before it gets worse. One of the advantages of this method is that you don’t need to have anyone nearby. Check out [url]http://theavh.org/refcover.htm[/url] for a referral. Try to choose someone who is certified as we specialize in Homeopathic Healing.

    Good luck. Feel free to post with any other specific questions.

    Dr. Jeff

    in reply to: rawhide bones #2386