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drjeff1

What to feed male cats with cystitis?

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  • #1986
    Anonymous

    Dear Dr. Jeff

    I have just read your page on feline cystitis. Finally, I understand what is going on. After a trip to the emergency room with my 4 1/2 yr.old, beautiful Siamese male cat, and a $1200.00 bill, I am trying to intelligently treat his problem. He became blocked after a month of on and off discomfort. He has been on a natural food called Wellness with occasional wet food since he was a kitten. Yes, it is dry food, but it has all the good things in it like blueberries, cranberries, and flaxseed which I believed would prevent this problem. Now he is on 2 antibiotics, same wet food which he now eats very little of. He will not eat the various varieties of CD and SD. Presently, I am lightly cooking and finely chopping chicken breast, which I don’t mind doing for awhile. It’s been a week and he is still straining, jumping in the sink to show me bloody urine, and acting a little weak; also there is weight loss. I also started giving him a homeopathic medicine called Bladder Irritation Relief made by Natra-Bio. What I would like to know is what kind of Natural food I can give him for this problem. The homeopathic book for pets claims that cats should be fed twice a day with wet food, and should fast in-between. Should I do this. I would really like to help this cat. I don’t feel the antibiotic Amoxil and Baytril are helping, but my vet tells me that they will keep the pet’s urine acidic. The type of crystals were diagnosed as phosphates. Also, I would like to know if I could give him a human style probiotic pill? I would appreciate your advice for my pet Tsar cat. He also has a very healthy companion seal point named Tasha. Tasha loves to nibble on the dry food, so it is a problem. Thank you for hearing me out.

    Sincerely,

    Eve

    #1989
    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=eve]What I would like to know is what kind of Natural food I can give him for this problem. [/quote]

    Hi again Eve-

    I am running out the door but… Please read the articles in my library about why cats shouldn’t eat dry food. Once you have read those then we can discuss this very important even further.

    I also strongly recommend that you read the excerpt from Michelle Bernard’s book. There is a wealth of excellent feline dietary (and general health care) info there.

    We’ll “talk” further when I get back.

    Good luck and start doing some of that reading.[/i]

    #1990
    Anonymous

    Hello Eve,

    Dry food is really the worst thing you can be feeding a cat with cystitis, or any cat in my opinion.

    When considering what type of food to feed your cat, think of how cats evolved: as desert creatures. They hunt and kill small animals. These small animals are upwards of 75% moisture. If water was not available, they were able to remain hydrated from their small prey diet.

    Now, let’s look at dry food. It contains less than 10% moisture. Your cat needs to drink a considerable amount of water in order to rehydrate the dry food. Cats are not thirst driven like dogs are. They usually do not drink enough water to remain hydrated if they are consuming a dry food diet. This means, the cat is in a constant state of dehydration. Not a good thing.

    Because cats evolved in an arid climate. they condense their urine and stools so that they expel as little moisture as possible when the eliminate. This posses another problem when the cat is consuming dry food.

    You say: “… but it has all the good things in it like blueberries, cranberries, and flaxseed …” These things may be good for humans or bears or raccoons, but not for a obligate carnivore like a cat. These ingredients are added in an attempt to correct problems that dry food causes in cats. Blueberries and cranberries are added in an attempt to make the diet more acidic. A cat’s natural diet is acidic, hence their digestive systems remain acidic, as they should be. A system that is alkaline is conducive to urinary tract disorders and dental disease.

    You also say, “He will not eat the various varieties of CD and SD.” Good for him. Those foods are crap (excuse my directness).

    My suggestion is, get him on canned Wellness or Nature’s Variety. Both of these canned foods are grain-free. You need to get the grains out of his diet. If you do this, his tendency towards cystitis *should* resolve. Cats, as a species, are very much declining in health because of poor diet and over vaccination. The often exhibit weakness in the urinary tract system and even if he’s on a better diet, he may still have issues with cystitis. In that instance, I strongly recommend you consult with a competent homeopathic vet and treat him that way. Conventional medicine is only going to suppress the problem.

    If you are open to feeding a raw meat diet, that is the best thing you can do for him. My book, Raising Cats Naturally, will give you all the information you need in order to start feeding him as Nature intended him to eat.

    You say, “It’s been a week and he is still straining, jumping in the sink to show me bloody urine, and acting a little weak; also there is weight loss.” That doesn’t sound good, I highly recommend you get that dry food out of your house and get him on canned. Add more water to the food prior to serving it.

    You may want to stay away from the combo homeopathic remedies like the one you mentioned. It could complicate things should you decide to seek homeopathic help. Try diet first and if that doesn’t work, take the next step.

    Yes, cats should be fed at least twice a day, three or four times is even better.

    You also say, “I don’t feel the antibiotic Amoxil and Baytril are helping, but my vet tells me that they will keep the pet’s urine acidic.” I agree, I doubt the antibiotics are helping. I’ll leave this to Dr. Jeff, but antibiotics making the urine more acidic? That’s a new one on me. Never heard that before. Conventional vets have very few tools available to them: antibiotics (which are getting stronger and stronger. I can remember when they used Amoxicillin, now they are using the big guns like Baytril.); steroids (which will probably be the next step should you chose to continue to treat conventionally) and special formula diets (which as I said above, were crap), oh, and I forgot, they can remove body parts that are causing problems. They may recommend the surgery to “correct” (and I use that term loosely) the problem.

    If there’s anything else I can do to help you, please feel free to ask.

    Michelle

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