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Ringworm

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Dr. Jeff Feinman 7 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #3983

    Anonymous

    Brand new kitten approx. 8-9 weeks old from shelter. Have 3 Maine Coons at home. Kitten to vet (shelter clinic cleared and gave 3rd distember on Friday). Took to my own vet, 2 small spots of ringworm. He has been treated at the foster mom’s with sulphur dip and some sort of perioxide wash. My vet put him on Diflucin(sp?)1/4 of a 50mg pill once a day, and I will do the perioxide wash each day. I started him immediately (and my 3 resident cats) on ImmunoSupport when he came into my home, along with probiotic. Washing towels, etc. with soap and apple cider vinegar. Judith Shoemaker is my holistic vet, still waiting to hear back from her. Anything else I can do to help ALL. He is in a playpen and I take him out and let him run around the bedroom and play, put him back into the pen. Bed covered with towels to be washed every day. Cats are not in the room at that time, but they do have access when he is penned due to the fact our A/C inverter units are situated in the ceilings of the two bedrooms and doors have to be kept open in order to cool the rest of the house. I will vacumn, should I spray with Lysol. I recently lost my 3 oldest felines, all within 10 months and wanted to give a home to a rescue child. I love my 3 Maines and want to keep them healthy. Any suggestions would be most welcome.

    #3984

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply Dr. Rose’s salve (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] excellent probiotics, and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    #3986

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply Dr. Rose’s salve (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=102&category_id=11&keyword=biotic]excellent probiotics[/url], and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    #3987

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=169&category_id=11&keyword=rose]Dr. Rose’s salve[/url] (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=102&category_id=11&keyword=biotic]excellent probiotics[/url], and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

    #3988

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Happy 4th! Thanks so much for your questions. As you probably know, ringworm (dermatophytosis) is due to a secondary invasion of a fungus of the skin. It is often associated with a weakened immune system associated with stress, vaccination, diet and lifestyle.

    Fortunately it is usually self-limiting. The body eliminates this opportunistic parasite relatively easily and quickly once given a healing environment. There are a few ways that you can speed up healing.

    First and foremost is providing a species-appropriate fresh food diet. For carnivores like cats, that would primarily include meats like chicken, rabbit, beef, small fish, etc. There are many ways to upgrade the diet. The easiest and most important is to eliminate dry food. Take a look at the articles in my diet library for much more info.

    Good local hygiene is also important. I advise my clients with long hair cats to she the area and apply [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=169&category_id=11&keyword=rose]Dr. Rose’s salve[/url] (clinically proven to treat a similar condition in horses) or the dilute apple cider vinegar solution that you are already using.

    In addition, immune boosters like 100-250mg vitamin C (this may already be in the ImmunoSupport you are giving), [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=26&category_id=11&keyword=dmg]DMG[/url] [url=https://www.homevet.com/pet-care-products?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=102&category_id=11&keyword=biotic]excellent probiotics[/url], and the following potent antioxidant blend are very helpful. To make my favorite phytonutrient antioxidant add a mix of 1 part fresh blueberries to one part fresh organic lightly steamed kale in a blender. Add a little fresh chicken broth and blenderize. Add 1 tsp. of this mixture to the food after testing it for palatability (try just a few drops in the food at first to make sure that your cat will eat it.

    Good luck! Please post here with any other questions and an update after you see Dr. Shoemaker (who may have other suggestions).

    Be well.

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