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drjeff1

Mix Breeding

This topic contains 7 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Anonymous 13 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #1782

    Anonymous

    This isn’t a medical problem but just a general question about breeding.

    If the two dogs involved are healthy and both have good temperaments then does it matter what breed they?

    I don’t mean two extremes like a Chihauhau and a Great Dane but just two medium to large size dogs for example mine, a Rough Collie and a Siberian Husky?

    All comments appreciated.
    Thanks
    Mark

    #1785

    Anonymous

    I don’t know the medical end of breeding so I can’t say if there would be problems in that way.

    I think aside from any potential medical issues, it comes down to if you would have customers to give/sell the puppies to etc.

    I have a german shepherd site and I know 99% of the members would never agree with breeding a gsd to another dog breed. Alot of people that are passionate about a particular breed want to see that breed stay within the confines to better the quality of the breed, to work out problems, be it with temperment or medical conditions like hip dysplasia. I by no means would condem a person for breeding whatever dogs they wanted to, my motto in life is “do whatever makes you happy as long as you aren’t hurting another person or animal”.

    Is there any reason you want to breed two different types of dogs? I think all dogs are awesome life wouldn’t be the same without them that’s for sure!

    #1788

    Anonymous

    Hi and thanks for your reply.

    The reason I asked was because I haven’t had my 4 and a half month puppy spayed yet and I keep having this nagging feeling that once she is spayed I might regret doing that in a couple of years. I know the health benefits in spaying and I certainly don’t want to put her at any risk just because of my selfish reasons that it might be nice one day to have puppies.

    My first choice for a dog has always been a Collie but because I live in China I didn’t think I could find one here but it turns out them and Siberian Huskys are popular here. A Siberian Husky would have been my second choice anyway and that’s why I’m thinking now about breeding the two together.

    As for finding good homes that wouldn’t be a problem and, in fact, depending on the size of the litter, if there were just four puppies I would keep them all.

    Thanks again,
    Mark

    #1789

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    Hi Mark-

    < I keep having this nagging feeling that once she is spayed I might regret doing that in a couple of years.

    Then you shouldn't spay her (as long as you are ready to ward off other dogs and clean up after her mess 1-2 times a year).

    <I know the health benefits in spaying and I certainly don't want to put her at any risk just because of my selfish reasons that it might be nice one day to have puppies.

    If there is no GREAT reason to breed her, e.g. valuable or unique breeding lines, then I would spay her (if she were mine). As far as breeding is concerned, the world, (including China) doesn't need more pups. In addition, why take a risk with your dog's health (pregnancy, whelping and lactation can be very tough on a dog-especially a toy breed).

    Personally I owned and bred (valuable lines) a Standard Poodle years ago. It was a NIGHTMARE (and chihuahuas which have a **VERY high incidence of needing c-sections** are worse). So if you don't want to spay your dog that's fine but personally I do not recommend breeding her.

    Dr. Jeff

    #1796

    Anonymous

    Thanks Dr Jeff,

    I do value your advice. She’s not planned to get spayed until July so I’m just taking this time now to look into the pros and cons of breeding her.

    Her health is my upmost concern and like you say the world is full of unwanted pups and adult dogs.

    I think for my personal reasons it is better to have her spayed and then adopt further puppies which need good homes.

    Thanks
    Mark

    #1797

    Anonymous

    Mark you sound like a good doggie parent!!

    I had a really hard time bringing Ryker in to be neutured. He was the pick of the litter and comes from great lines. After my last GS died, Ceasar, two years ago I was so upset and started to feel regrets that we had him fixed and I never had one of his puppies, but that all changed when I got Ryker. I thought long and hard about breeding or studding ryker out but then I realised I knew I wouldn’t have regrets I didnt’ need one of his puppies because there are so many wonderful professional breeders out there that I can go back to for another dog when the time is right.

    Good luck w/your girl!! Sounds like she is loved a whole bunch!

    #1799

    Anonymous

    Hi and thanks. You sound like a great responsible parent too. Ryker sounds gorgeous and what a great name! I may even have to steal it for my next puppy!

    You are right and the more I think about it, it will be better for my circumstances anyway to get a puppy that needs a good home. Echo is so beautiful and so well behaved and has the greatest temperament around people and other animals, I guess I just want more like her and so I thought about breeding.

    I’ve been reading so many horror stories about how things can go wrong with the whole whelping process and I just couldn’t take the risk in any harm coming to her so I won’t do it.

    It sounds like you prefer male dogs to female and I would like to ask why? Echo is my first dog and I chose a female because I read that females are less aggressive and easier to train and they don’t do the whole marking their territory thing. Is there a specific reason why you prefer male dogs to females?

    Thanks for taking the time to reply,
    Mark

    #1800

    Anonymous

    We’ve had 3 males and 2 females all german shepherds. I’m not sure why I’m partial to the male, they are definately alot more goofy then the female and I love it when they are goofy!

    Males can be more aggressive but having them neutured and training helps. Females can be agressive too esp if two females are together. At some point I’d love to get Ryker a sister or a brother, he generally likes females better then males so I may end up with a female. To be honest too I haven’t had a female dog since I was a kid so I can’t even remember that well what it’s like to have females!

    Echo is a pretty name I like it! Ryker was named after his father Ryker Vom Mittlewest, my Rykers name is LFR Sir Ryker of Boston.

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