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drjeff1

eye tearing and staining

This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Dr. Jeff Feinman 14 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #1894

    Anonymous

    Hi, I just found this site and am hoping someone can answer my question. I inherited my grandmother’s shizapoo about a year ago.
    while living with my grandma she had very healthy, clear eyes. Since I have taken over, she has really bad brown staining under and around the eyes and around the mouth. I haven’t changed her diet, she is 6 years old. My vet said that this is common with this breed and there is nothing that can be done, but she lived for 5 years without it. Could it be allergy related? She was a city dog, now she lives in the country… is there a nutritional supplement for this? I feel that it must be an internal problem being around the eye and mouth. Any ideas??

    #1896

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=sheri]Since I have taken over, she has really bad brown staining under and around the eyes and around the mouth. I haven’t changed her diet,
    My vet said that this is common with this breed and there is nothing that can be done, but she lived for 5 years without it.
    Could it be allergy related? [/quote]

    Hi Sheri-

    This type of eye (and mouth) staining is due to porphyrins in the tears and saliva. As your vet said, this is very common.

    As you have correctly realized (by the fact that it has just started) this may be “common” but it’s not normal (see my common vs. normal handout at [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/common.html[/url] ).

    In a nutshell, these common but not normal symptoms are one way that the body externally manifests that all is not right internally. In this case I agree that an immune phenomena related to allergies (due to her new environment) is the trigger.

    Allergies in general are always a clue that the immune system is not functioning properly (it is hyper-sensitive). You can address this in several ways. The most direct (but least practical) is determination and avoidance of the incriminating allergen. Although this method works very well, it doesn’t actually correct the problem but avoids the trigger which results in the symptom.

    The second method is to temporarily cover up (palliate) the problem. This can be done in a few ways. Some dogs are given antihistamines or steroids which relieve the symptoms for as long as the drugs (which can be toxic) are taken. Alternatively you can modify the diet, e.g. by using higher quality food (gluten-free and fresh food diets are best) or add supplements (like EFA-Z+ fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, Antiox antioxidants, etc.).

    The BEST treatment IMHO is to get to the crux of the problem with homeopathic treatment. A well-trained, experienced vet homeopath can work with you to eliminate your dog’s immune imbalance (which actually has an energetic basis which homeopathic remedies will address).

    The best part of treating this way is that you will dramatically reduce your acquired dog’s chances of getting chronic degenerative diseases as she gets older. See [url]https://www.homevet.com/petcare/homeopat.html[/url] for a brief introduction to this fascinating system of medicine. You will then want to read the more detailed links in my homeopathy section which include an online copy of a great intro book (“Beyond Flat Earth Medicine”).

    Good luck. Let us know what happens.

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