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drjeff1

dental care

This topic contains 4 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Dr. Jeff Feinman 14 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #1829

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    I was just feeding my dogs a very late breakfast (Honest Kitchen/veggie-herb mix from Dr. Harvey/venison) and I was adding some frozen Ezekiel bread for my picky 14 year old Standard Poodle.

    As I broke off hard chunks I realized that frozen bread or (even better) hard rolls would be a great adjunct for dental care in picky pets (like mine). Of course RAW (never cooked) chicken wings, chicken/turkey/duck necks or other consumable raw bones are still the best way to keep teeth clean naturally.

    Unfortunately some older pets turn their noses up at those items so we need to brush their teeth daily or find something appropriate that they will eat (other options include big carrots, whole apples, or anything large enough to work out the jaw and scrape the teeth).

    I’ve made this recommendation to clients in the past, but just wanted to post it here as well and thought that *preventative* dental care might be a good topic to discuss.[/u]

    #1838

    Anonymous

    [quote=drjeff]so we need to brush their teeth daily[/quote]Any suggestions on where I can find any info on how to do the brushing and/or what tools/supplies are handy? Thanks.

    #1840

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Gardariki]Any suggestions on where I can find any info on how to do the brushing and/or what tools/supplies are handy? [/quote]

    It’s pretty much like brushing our own teeth. The main differences are that you want to use a specific animal toothpaste (I prefer the CET tartar control which has abrasives as well as enzymes) and that you should use soft toothbrush (so you can brush the gums as well as the teeth).

    This link [url] [url]http://petplace.netscape.com/articles/artShow.asp?artID=4098[/url] should help.

    [/url]

    #1848

    Anonymous

    Thanks for the link. Does not look difficult.
    [quote]Good dental hygiene should start with a young pet with healthy new teeth and gums, or after your pet has had a professional dental cleaning.[/quote]Do you recommend the professional cleaning? How do they do that? If full anesthesia is required I couldn’t care less.

    #1849

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Gardariki]Do you recommend the professional cleaning? How do they do that? If full anesthesia is required I couldn’t care less.[/quote]

    Yes and no (how’s that for wishy washy 😉 ). If there [i]really[/i] is dental disease (severe tartar, gum disease, etc.) that can be helped by a professional cleaning (under anesthesia) then there is no getting around it.

    IMHO dental prophlaxis (which, when done properly, is always an anesthetic procedure) is over prescribed. *Early* dental disease can frequently be treated with a raw meaty bone diet (especially chicken wings and necks or turkey necks for bigger dogs).

    Gingivitis is often a manifestation of inflammation unrelated to oral pathology. This needs to be treated internally and only occasionally improves after dental prophylaxis (or great diet, or brushing, or anything short of an internal energetic shift).

    Anyway, that’s my opinion. I’d love to hear other people’s experiences.

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