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drjeff1

Anesthesia allergy? Or cardiomyopathy?

This topic contains 1 reply, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Dr. Jeff Feinman 13 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #1967

    Anonymous

    When my cat was 3 months old he went through the neuter procedure. He recovered fine when I saw him 2 hours after his surgery. However, 10 hours later he had developed a head tilt, nystagmus, and a grade 3 heart murmur. The ECG showed increased p waves, the x rays were inconclusive. He is now 11 months old and the nystagmus and murmur have since resolved, but the head tilt is still present. My vet thinks that maybe he had cardiomyopathy that presented during the surgery. Do you have any thoughts about what else it could be?

    #1969

    Dr. Jeff Feinman
    Keymaster

    [quote=Meghann] the head tilt is still present. My vet thinks that maybe he had cardiomyopathy that presented during the surgery. Do you have any thoughts about what else it could be?[/quote]

    Good morning Meghann-

    In my opinion, this sounds like a vestibular neurologic disease triggered by something related to the neutering. It s unlikely that the anesthesia caused the event per se but rather, as your vet said, was a trigger for an underlying problem.

    From a homeopathic point of view this episode is easily explained. Basically it started with an underlying (energetic) imbalance. This imbalance was not clinically evident before the neutering (though a veterinary homeopath may have been able to detect subtle clues such as discussed in my “common vs. normal’ handout at: [url]https://www.homevet.com/newclient/common.html[/url]

    The underlying imbalance was then accentuated by something related to the neutering, e.g. the anesthesia, surgical stress, being away from home, etc. This then resulted in the neurological symptoms which became evident after the neutering.

    As the imbalance gradually improved (due to his own natural healing abilities) most of the symptoms have resolved. The persistence of the head tilt is evidence that everything is not back to where it should be in his body.

    If you want to rule out structural pathology, e.g. cardiomyopathy vs. brain disease, you need to have bloodwork, urinalysis, x-rays, echocardiogram, a spinal tap +/- an MRI performed.

    Fortunately a vet homeopath can treat the imbalance without a full work-up. We know that it is on an energetic level and therefore the diagnostic tests are secondary (though they are essential to help in forming an accurate prognosis).

    Good luck. I hope you start treating homeopathically and holistically before your cat gets much older.

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